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DIY 100 hr service or not

Old 01-01-2019, 10:56 AM
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Default DIY 100 hr service or not

Just came up on 100 hrs on twin 2017 Yamaha 150's. What are opinions on whether I should do the service or let a dealer do the service. Not sure when I sell the boat whether it is worth having that paperwork from the dealer on services. Also should I change the impeller or not? Mostly freshwater some saltwater.
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Old 01-01-2019, 11:05 AM
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Do all my service myself, just save the receipt from the purchase of the parts/oils. I had a pair of Yamaha 150s, but can not recall if they call for impeller at 100 hours or once a year.
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Old 01-01-2019, 11:10 AM
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Good luck if you do.. A lot of guys do it & they say its pretty easy..
I like to tinker but honestly when it comes to these high dollar toys; why mess around? By the time you get the books you need to figure out exactly how to service, torque wrenches, and the kit etc. etc. your pretty darn close to paying a shop. Additionally the shop might find something "preventative" that maybe you would have not seen. don't get me wrong you need to be careful when they start changing things that aren't broke but sometimes there are items are close to end of life you mind as well change vs it going bad on a trip.
JUST MY 2 CENTS
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Old 01-01-2019, 11:31 AM
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My 2 cents. I believe your warranties are still in effect. Having dealer service records could potentially avoid issues with possible future warranty work. Outside warranty period, either option, however appreciate that secondary purchasers typically prefer dealer service records over personal receipts for parts.
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Old 01-01-2019, 11:32 AM
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Of course. A manual and a few parts really???
Not like you rebuilding the lu .
This country used to produce these people..
I believe they were called men
Document .Pictures
Recipts in a folder with each engine serial numbers on it .
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Old 01-01-2019, 11:38 AM
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Originally Posted by tripsTOquads View Post
Good luck if you do.. A lot of guys do it & they say its pretty easy..
I like to tinker but honestly when it comes to these high dollar toys; why mess around? By the time you get the books you need to figure out exactly how to service, torque wrenches, and the kit etc. etc. your pretty darn close to paying a shop. Additionally the shop might find something "preventative" that maybe you would have not seen. don't get me wrong you need to be careful when they start changing things that aren't broke but sometimes there are items are close to end of life you mind as well change vs it going bad on a trip.
JUST MY 2 CENTS
the big thing this overlooks is time. Can/how fast can the dealer get you in and out, and does that disrupt your schedule? A first service (even for 2 motors) can be easily done in the driveway on a weekday after work, where as just getting the thing over to the dealer could in many cases take that long. Obviously some dealers are more capable than others.
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Old 01-01-2019, 11:49 AM
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Default Yep

Always impeller... but in big one preventative maintenance
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Old 01-01-2019, 11:50 AM
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By the time you get the books you need to figure out exactly how to service, torque wrenches, and the kit etc. etc. your pretty darn close to paying a shop.
I totally disagree with this statement. If you invest in the tools & manual, and you are somewhat competent, you will save a lot of money in the long run. Also you do not need to change the impeller at 100hrs.

100 Hr kits: https://www.simyamaha.com/category_s/1848.htm
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Old 01-01-2019, 12:04 PM
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just paid a private tech 730 $ to do my 100 hr service impeller looked like new 2016 sho 250 Yamaha put in a new one because it was apart took 2hr tops I will do it myself in the future I felt like a dummy to have paid that much for a job that easy.... no insult meant to outboard techs everyone has to eat
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Old 01-01-2019, 12:10 PM
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Do it yourself. You save money and the bigger benefit is you understanding your boat better.
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Old 01-01-2019, 12:10 PM
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If you have the tools and the time, do it yourself. It's not hard to mess up simple service. 1 plug out=1 plug in. Oil out=oil in, etc. Buy the service manual and get genuine parts/oil online or support your local shop. You'll get a sense of accomplishment, you learn something about your boat if and when something goes wrong, and if you can't figure something out, then you can at least take it to the dealer who will probably feel sorry for you and give you a break and help you out.

I am at the point in my life now where I'm a whole lot better at buying someone else's time than I am selling my own to earn or save. And for me, buying my time back means time for more important things like spending time with my family
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Old 01-01-2019, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Bruce1505 View Post
just paid a private tech 730 $ to do my 100 hr service impeller looked like new 2016 sho 250 Yamaha put in a new one because it was apart took 2hr tops I will do it myself in the future I felt like a dummy to have paid that much for a job that easy.... no insult meant to outboard techs everyone has to eat
Assuming you are able to do the job (have the skills, tools, etc), the next question is: how much do you value your time? If you value your time below $300+/hr. => just do it
I like doing my own maintenances, not only to save money, but to feed my needs of knowing how things work and be able to repair them in an urgency. There is also the peace of mind of knowing that a job was properly done and no shortcuts were taken (sorry I know I should trust more in other people, but the reality is that I don't)
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Old 01-01-2019, 01:03 PM
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I have 150's and do partly myself: I change oil, plugs, lower unit lube, main fuel filter, lube cables and linkage then pay dealer to do the vst other fuel filter and run a quick diagnostic.
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Old 01-01-2019, 01:25 PM
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Every 100 I do motor oil, oil filter, fuel filter, gear lube, washers, fuel/water separator, grease prop shaft, grease zerks.

For impeller, anodes, t-stats, and spark plugs I take to someone and that is every 200-300.

Agree with above comments about knowing it was done and done properly as well as satisfaction of being familiar with my vessel. I learned by watching youtube videos. If you change the oil in your your truck yourself, then this is just an extension of that. But if you are nervous about it or do not use tools very often, it might be easier to just pay someone to do it.
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Old 01-01-2019, 01:33 PM
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I always DIY whenever possible. There is nobody on the planet that will do a better job, be more diligent, or be more careful with my boats than me.

Sure, if something is above my skill level or my time availability, I will take it to a shop. But for me that involves, calling, scheduling, hauling, towing...and then picking up an doing everything in reverse. And then of course i have to redo everything they screwed up......

I suppose I could try to find a mobile mechanic if I really wanted to, but that doesn't address the issue in the first paragraph above....

There is no warranty problem if you DIY, as long as you do it right.
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Old 01-01-2019, 05:46 PM
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Thanks for all the different points of view. My main concern was the paperwork when I sell it. Seems like most of you do your own so that’s the direction I’m heading.
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Old 01-01-2019, 06:09 PM
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u need no manuals, all u need is youtube. its quicker for me to do maintenance then to hook it up and drag the boat to a dealer. all u need is basic tools. u probably dont need the impeller. i do the impellers every 2-3 years. if u are so worried about warranty issues then save the receipt
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Old 01-01-2019, 06:22 PM
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Originally Posted by tripsTOquads View Post
Good luck if you do.. A lot of guys do it & they say its pretty easy..
I like to tinker but honestly when it comes to these high dollar toys; why mess around? By the time you get the books you need to figure out exactly how to service, torque wrenches, and the kit etc. etc. your pretty darn close to paying a shop. Additionally the shop might find something "preventative" that maybe you would have not seen. don't get me wrong you need to be careful when they start changing things that aren't broke but sometimes there are items are close to end of life you mind as well change vs it going bad on a trip.
JUST MY 2 CENTS
this is the silliest thing i've read today.
1) getting the books is easy as googling F225 or whatever motors service manual, plus its better than a book because the chapters zoom to the screen with a single click.
2) getting the kit is easy as going onto SIM yamaha and clicking or calling with the motor(s) you have. And a tech or dealership is nearly ALWAYS going to overcharge for parts.
3) you own a boat and dont have a torque wrench? $200 rigid drill and torque hammer kit, $30 harbor freight metric 1/4 and 3/8 socket kit, $100 in two torque wrenches.... ALL these tools cost less than 1/2 tank of my boats fuel tank to fill up.
4) preventative maintenance isn't checked by the oil monkeys at the dealer. sure, you maybe get lucky and the 10 year vet top notch mechanic is doing an oil change, but highly unlikely. look over it and look for burnt wires, lube points, belt condition, any rusting, etc, its not that hard.
5) you are relying on someone else with your life working on your outboards in my opinion, at least rely on yourself for your well-being. i would never leave on 100-mile nautical trip fresh out of the dealers shop after service. i've heard too many horror stories.
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Old 01-01-2019, 06:29 PM
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I do my own service on twin 300 Zukes every 100 hours. Every 200 hours I take it to the shop. I can't handle those heavy LUs by myself. In my younger days maybe.
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Old 01-01-2019, 08:31 PM
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To get the best of both worlds, do the maintenance items that you can perform at home, keep the receipts and a log of what you did. What you can't do, have the dealer do the procedures. You will want a copy of the computer diagnostic report on the motor, The results of a leakdown test (4-stroke motors), and the dealer to check if any service codes are present and if any service bulletins or campaigns apply to your motor.

Especially when the motor is under warranty, you have the knowledge that a complete factory service was done on the motor correctly so there would be no question about it in the future. It is possible that a warranty claim could be called into question if an error code was in memory that affected the longevity of the motor and caused a problem down the road. A DIY owner could find himself being labeled negligent and the warranty refused. Why take the chance?
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