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Beautiful Plywood Boats.

Old 12-11-2018, 04:56 PM
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Old 12-11-2018, 05:13 PM
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Interesting thought for all and everyone!!HULL THICKNESS !!
Take a long hard look at the WOODEN BOATS construction and the thickness of there hulls !
Some thicknesses used in them days would scare the pants off most guys and it was mostly 3 ply !!later was discovered 5 ply was more ridged then even later the plys of veneers making up those ply could be moved round intstead of 0/90 all the time
Later could get 0 45 plus and minus 0 now that was different to use and allowed bending much easier !
Lots of 3 ,4, and 5 ply we used for race boats came from Israel was beautiful stuff like never seen before and so easy to work with !
Going back to hull thicknesses don't you think those glass hulls being insanely thick are the slightest bit idiotic ??
Personally I think its completely stupid !!
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Old 12-11-2018, 05:20 PM
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Originally Posted by maxie View Post
WTF are you doing????
My apology maxie.

Maybe the mods will give us an early Xmas present.
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Old 12-11-2018, 05:23 PM
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Originally Posted by maxie View Post
WTF are you doing????
ditto!! He’s like a nasty beatleguese
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Old 12-11-2018, 05:29 PM
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Old 12-11-2018, 07:48 PM
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Compound shapes are made with plywood by Lap strake planking. When I worked for the Skiff Craft Company in Plain City Ohio we received a rail car of plywood every three months and planking stock was 3/8" and !/2" MDO Marine fir ply pre-scarfed to 4' x 26' long sheets. You know you earned your $1.85 an hour after unloading a box car of plywood by hand for two days.

The Carolina boys are ripping sheets of ply into strips and double diagonally planking layers glued with epoxy.

Compound shapes are curved in two directions. Like the forward section of a hull with flare.

Typically Plywood boats have develop-able surfaces. This means the shape is derived from cylinders and cones connected together. Like a paper cup or funnel.
Any two lines in space can be wrapped with sheet material, such as the sheer and chine wrapped with plywood planking. What shape you get is what the material can do. You will find that there are straight lines along the surface in one or another direction.

Plywood can be tortured to bend in two directions. This makes a stressed skin construction. The Willis is like that.

This 1929 Arrow is an extreme. When I found it I thought the plywood deck on a planked hull was from later years. It was a shock to find out they had plywood for Marine use that early.

You will notice the "Squat boards" clipped to each hull side. I don't know what else to call them. their purpose was not for extra lift, but the precursor to "non trip " chines. Grampa didn't like his ass getting thrown into the water in a turn either.




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Old 12-11-2018, 08:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Otseg View Post
Compound shapes are made with plywood by Lap strake planking. When I worked for the Skiff Craft Company in Plain City Ohio we received a rail car of plywood every three months and planking stock was 3/8" and !/2" MDO Marine fir ply pre-scarfed to 4' x 26' long sheets. You know you earned your $1.85 an hour after unloading a box car of plywood by hand for two days.

The Carolina boys are ripping sheets of ply into strips and double diagonally planking layers glued with epoxy.

Compound shapes are curved in two directions. Like the forward section of a hull with flare.

Typically Plywood boats have develop-able surfaces. This means the shape is derived from cylinders and cones connected together. Like a paper cup or funnel.
Any two lines in space can be wrapped with sheet material, such as the sheer and chine wrapped with plywood planking. What shape you get is what the material can do. You will find that there are straight lines along the surface in one or another direction.

Plywood can be tortured to bend in two directions. This makes a stressed skin construction. The Willis is like that.

This 1929 Arrow is an extreme. When I found it I thought the plywood deck on a planked hull was from later years. It was a shock to find out they had plywood for Marine use that early.

You will notice the "Squat boards" clipped to each hull side. I don't know what else to call them. their purpose was not for extra lift, but the precursor to "non trip " chines. Grampa didn't like his ass getting thrown into the water in a turn either.




Looks almost like an Italian shoe. Really puts our modern craftsmanship to shame
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Old 12-11-2018, 10:28 PM
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What no comments in the hull thickness thing ??
It used to be amazing tearing along in a ply wood boat and watching the hull bobbing up and down as you rode over the chop !
Was even uncomfortable to be standing on it as well !with all and every boat I can never remember one ever breaking !
And ribs inside could be 24 to 36 inchs apart and the stringers were usually 50mm wide x 12 mm thick !
then half ribs for the hull bottom only crept into being as speeds increased and INBOARD motors got bigger !.
Cant remember when I saw my first outboard !But it was old
The mighty seagull outboard 6 hp and one of my friends father had 2 seagulls on the back of his 16 foot cuddy cabin !
My own wee SK boat I designed at 14 years of age and later built when I was 16 years of age was all 1/4 inch ply and i could lift the bow above my head not problem Motor was in the back with a vee drive to get the shaft angle down as low as possible ! ahh that days will never come again !
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Old 12-12-2018, 07:09 AM
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Originally Posted by NedLloyd View Post

.
Now that is a beautiful day boat!
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Old 12-12-2018, 07:10 AM
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Originally Posted by tunnles View Post
What no comments in the hull thickness thing ??
Wrong Thread.....
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Old 12-12-2018, 08:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Otseg View Post
Compound shapes are made with plywood by Lap strake planking. When I worked for the Skiff Craft Company in Plain City Ohio we received a rail car of plywood every three months and planking stock was 3/8" and !/2" MDO Marine fir ply pre-scarfed to 4' x 26' long sheets. You know you earned your $1.85 an hour after unloading a box car of plywood by hand for two days.

The Carolina boys are ripping sheets of ply into strips and double diagonally planking layers glued with epoxy.

Compound shapes are curved in two directions. Like the forward section of a hull with flare.

Typically Plywood boats have develop-able surfaces. This means the shape is derived from cylinders and cones connected together. Like a paper cup or funnel.
Any two lines in space can be wrapped with sheet material, such as the sheer and chine wrapped with plywood planking. What shape you get is what the material can do. You will find that there are straight lines along the surface in one or another direction.

Plywood can be tortured to bend in two directions. This makes a stressed skin construction. The Willis is like that.

This 1929 Arrow is an extreme. When I found it I thought the plywood deck on a planked hull was from later years. It was a shock to find out they had plywood for Marine use that early.

You will notice the "Squat boards" clipped to each hull side. I don't know what else to call them. their purpose was not for extra lift, but the precursor to "non trip " chines. Grampa didn't like his ass getting thrown into the water in a turn either.




looks to have a step, is it straight across, or angled to stern?
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Old 12-12-2018, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by finbox View Post
looks to have a step, is it straight across, or angled to stern?
The step runs straight across.
In this video you can see a sister-ship, and a boat bottom clearly depicting the typical step of the day.
I believe that's Lake Elsinore in Southern California.. There was an Elsinore boat company and on a business trip I made a pilgrimage to see the lake.
I can assure you if you dropped the average person from Eastern North Carolina there, they would think that they landed on the Moon.


Last edited by Otseg; 12-12-2018 at 11:15 AM.
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Old 12-12-2018, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Otseg View Post
The step runs straight across.
In this video you can see a sister-ship, and a boat bottom clearly depicting the typical step of the day.
I believe that's Lake Elsinore in Southern California.. There was an Elsinore boat company and on a business trip I made a pilgrimage to see the lake.
I can assure you if you dropped the average person from Eastern North Carolina there, they would think that they landed on the Moon.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJH24Y3_Y9c

Love the film footage, my Dad (now gone) had somthing very similar to these on the L.I. Sound in the 30's I believer. I have old black & white piks of it. It had a twin cylinder (no cowling) Johnson that was 35 or 40 H.P. Very fast and scary he said!!
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Old 12-12-2018, 01:21 PM
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really cool stuff..............Wood has soul.............My grand father used to build the classic wooden skiffs for folks. Man I wished I had one
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Old 12-12-2018, 02:09 PM
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One of my boats my wife does know about is a Simmons Skiff built in Wilmington NC. by Thomas Norwood Simmons
I bought it to look for waterfront property. Not being "from here", I could pull up to a future Jim's boat yard and when the owners came running over they would shout, "Hey! My Dad used to have a Simmons".
Mine is one of only two "open" skiffs built. All the other some 400 Simmons Skiff's built had a short fore deck. The 85 hp Suzuki two stroke that came with it is triple over kill. I have a five and a six gallon remote tank.
Five gallons of gas gets me nearly out of sight of where I started, and six gallons is enough gas to get me back.
Like the USS Constitution, it is all original and beautiful.

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Old 12-12-2018, 05:30 PM
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My dads wooden boat. Well he didn't really own it, but he drove it.

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Old 12-12-2018, 08:23 PM
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The Higgins PT boats may well have been plywood (the post war Higgins runabouts were).
The ELCO PT boats were not plywood.
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Old 12-13-2018, 06:28 AM
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I was raised in a wolverine. Not fast but a beautiful plywood boat.
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Old 12-13-2018, 07:34 AM
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When I worked at the Stamford Ct. Luders Yard there was an Elco PT in town in remarkable condition. Diagonal timber planked with 5 screws at each plank intersection, but BHDs and gussets were all plywood. I would believe the Higgins were the same. Bob Derecktor was a PT boat driver in the Pacific until they found out he was a boat builder and made him in charge of repair. He fitted 4 jeep fires with plywood on top as a shock absorbing helm station. Pt's were pounder's. They stripped off all unneeded equipment to reduce weight, including the torpedo launchers. The torpedoes were tied to the rail, and when they made their attack, the guys rolled them into the water, then they reversed and escaped by running the reciprocal course to attack. Comes to mind, "You can't make this stuff up".

My fave is the Miami Aircraft Rescue boat. They were a much better design. I would have one but they are to big to hide from my Wife. Miami Ships was right downtown Miami on the Miami River. tnm_18_3-4_173-184.pdf

I worked with Troy Wollard who in WW II was building the 63's on the day shift and night time he built casting patterns for Harry Schoells Dad's Foundry building government parts. After the War they got a letter from Truman thanking them for their participation building the Atomic Bomb. Perhaps around 1947 He built the first fiberglass boat in Florida, a 21' called the Challenger. Comes to mind, "You can't make this stuff up". The only way Troy would come to the dedication of the marker was that all of the wood boat builders gathered there wanted to curse him for developing such a smelly, itchy material to build boats with and that amused him.




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Old 12-13-2018, 12:06 PM
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My friend in Hollywood had this plywood 25' built. Have not gotten a ride yet. Looks like a chick magnet to me.





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