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Bottom Paint Question(s) - Charleston

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Bottom Paint Question(s) - Charleston

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Old 10-10-2018, 09:04 AM
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Default Bottom Paint Question(s) - Charleston

I have a 24' center console (planing hull that frequently goes over 30mph) that I leave in the water near an inlet in a fast moving tidal saltwater current (Charleston typically has between a 5' and 6' tide). I have 1 year old ablative bottom paint that is not doing the trick. I am also paying a diver to clean the bottom once a month - which helps but he is known to miss some areas. I have the most trouble with the waterline/chine and the bottom of the V in the stern - hard and soft growth. I usually only take the boat out of the water 2 or 3 times a year for service - for a week to 10 days at a time.

A couple of questions:

Since it is a planing hull and I have someone cleaning the hull monthly - am I stupid to use ablative paint? Seems like I may be accelerating the ablative process by running the boat fast and scrubbing the bottom.

Am I better off with a self polishing paint like Micron 66 or a true hard bottom paint? I am intrigued with the idea of using a good "hard" bottom paint so I can possibly pick up some speed and fuel economy. But since I pull the boat out of the water a few times a year then that may be a mistake if that kills the effectiveness of the paint.

Any recommendations on the best bottom paints in areas like Charleston for planing hulls???? Thanks a ton for the help and feedback! I am beginning to think bottom paint is trickier than prop science.
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Old 10-10-2018, 10:47 AM
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I run a 24 Grady Offshore in the NE and pull it every November-April. I use Interluxe Ultra....it is a hard bottom paint. It does a good job for one season. As I re-paint every spring i am not into spending $300+ for a gallon of paint and I tried the ablative once......it failed. Never again.
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Old 10-10-2018, 01:57 PM
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What ablative paint did you use. I've used Micron CSC in a heavy fouling area in S.W. Fla. and had good performance (2 years).
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Old 10-10-2018, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by ccim View Post
I have a 24' center console (planing hull that frequently goes over 30mph) that I leave in the water near an inlet in a fast moving tidal saltwater current (Charleston typically has between a 5' and 6' tide). I have 1 year old ablative bottom paint that is not doing the trick. I am also paying a diver to clean the bottom once a month - which helps but he is known to miss some areas. I have the most trouble with the waterline/chine and the bottom of the V in the stern - hard and soft growth. I usually only take the boat out of the water 2 or 3 times a year for service - for a week to 10 days at a time.

A couple of questions:

Since it is a planing hull and I have someone cleaning the hull monthly - am I stupid to use ablative paint? Seems like I may be accelerating the ablative process by running the boat fast and scrubbing the bottom.

Am I better off with a self polishing paint like Micron 66 or a true hard bottom paint? I am intrigued with the idea of using a good "hard" bottom paint so I can possibly pick up some speed and fuel economy. But since I pull the boat out of the water a few times a year then that may be a mistake if that kills the effectiveness of the paint.

Any recommendations on the best bottom paints in areas like Charleston for planing hulls???? Thanks a ton for the help and feedback! I am beginning to think bottom paint is trickier than prop science.

I would try the Micron CSC. Put 2 coats on it and 3 coats on the waterline, and the chines.(pressure areas). Hard bottom paint does lose its schtoop very quick....48 Hours. Hard also builds up and cracks and falls off due to the different shrinkage rates of the layers of paint. Pettit used to make a high load copper ablative that I used to love. It was called Boatyard ablative. Came in red, blue and black only, but it was excellent. Probably not around anymore.
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Old 10-10-2018, 04:36 PM
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I'm in the North East and 2 years ago I totally re did the bottom paint on my boat. I have 2 coats of Pettit Ultima SR-60 and it works amazingly well. The waterline does discolor some from the copper but nothing grows on it. I put a coat of Pettit Hydrocoat on the waterline as recommended by a Pettit rep to make it black again in the spring before I launch. I used to use Interlux Micron Extra but I had to put a fresh coat on every year otherwise I would get fouling. I'm extremely happy with my choice and highly recommend it.
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Old 10-11-2018, 01:42 PM
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A marina in Massachusetts switched to Interlux two years ago. When they pulled all their boats in the fall, they were all a mess. I'd try SeaHawk AF33 for a season with a pint of biocop added to it or you can splurge and buy the entire gallon of biocop which is a little more expensive than AF33
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Old 10-11-2018, 03:56 PM
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Originally Posted by ccim View Post
I have a 24' center console (planing hull that frequently goes over 30mph) that I leave in the water near an inlet in a fast moving tidal saltwater current (Charleston typically has between a 5' and 6' tide). I have 1 year old ablative bottom paint that is not doing the trick. I am also paying a diver to clean the bottom once a month - which helps but he is known to miss some areas. I have the most trouble with the waterline/chine and the bottom of the V in the stern - hard and soft growth. I usually only take the boat out of the water 2 or 3 times a year for service - for a week to 10 days at a time.

A couple of questions:

Since it is a planing hull and I have someone cleaning the hull monthly - am I stupid to use ablative paint? Seems like I may be accelerating the ablative process by running the boat fast and scrubbing the bottom.

Am I better off with a self polishing paint like Micron 66 or a true hard bottom paint? I am intrigued with the idea of using a good "hard" bottom paint so I can possibly pick up some speed and fuel economy. But since I pull the boat out of the water a few times a year then that may be a mistake if that kills the effectiveness of the paint.

Any recommendations on the best bottom paints in areas like Charleston for planing hulls???? Thanks a ton for the help and feedback! I am beginning to think bottom paint is trickier than prop science.
I'm in the Chesapeake Bay with a 24 foot CC. My boat was wet slipped from last April 15 until last week. I started the season with Micron CSC, and I've been really happy with it. I run the boat pretty much every weekend, often both days, but it gets essentially no water movement in the slip (it's right on the bulkhead). I get a little scum buildup/discoloration on the sides and stern at the water line, but there is otherwise no growth on the hull. I brush the sides and transom from the boat every so often. I pulled it out twice for service, and the bottom is in vary good shape. There was a lot of growth on the unpainted transducer, engine bracket below the water line, and trim tabs, including barnacles, but I painted the transducer with transducer paint (there is such a thing, it turns out), and primed the underwater part of the engine bracket and the trim tabs with Interlux Primocon and painted them with Interlux Trilux 33, which is made for metal. I've had no growth on the transducer, engine bracket or trim tabs since then, although I do brush them off from the boat every once in a while.

This was my first year with bottom paint - the boat was new last year, and I kept it on a trailer. FWIW, I have noticed no difference in top speed or time to plane with the bottom paint.

I'd be interested in what paint you're using. I've been very happy with the paint I'm using and I haven't had the need to hire a diver to clean it. But the Bay is more brackish water that the Atlantic on the SC coast (especially this year with all of the rain), so the same paint may be less effective where you are.

I grew up in Charleston and have a friend there with a 34 foot CC that is in a slip at Toler's Cove in Mount Pleasant. He repaints every 18 months or so and has a diver clean it about once a month. I'll see if I can find out what he's using and if he's happy with it.
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Old 10-11-2018, 04:05 PM
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I use Pettit Ultima SR60 ablative paint, similar conditions to you and two coats last a little over two years. I don't have someone cleaning the hull and haven't needed to.
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Old 10-11-2018, 04:18 PM
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My boat is slipped year round in Murrells inlet , just north of you. I pulled it out before hurricane florence after being in the water for 11 months straight. I use rustoleum anti fouling paint ( two coats) , no barnacles or crazy sea creatures to be found, just some slime that I knocked off with the pressure washer.
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Old 10-12-2018, 11:18 AM
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Looks like Micron CSC is going on the bottom next week. Thanks for all of the feedback!
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Old 11-03-2018, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by ccim View Post
Looks like Micron CSC is going on the bottom next week. Thanks for all of the feedback!
Just heard back from my friend with the 34 Reg at Toler’s. He uses Micron CSC. I think you’ll be happy with it.
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Old 11-03-2018, 11:22 AM
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Interlux Micron CSC and Micron 66 are both ablative paints. From advertisements:

"Micron CSC is an great multi-season ablative bottom paint with a copper-copolymer formula that provides controlled release of antifouling biocides at the paint surface.The longevity of the coating depends on the amount of paint applied. CSC retains its effectiveness even when the boat is removed from the water for extended periods (winter storage, for example). To reactivate come springtime, use a stiff brush or powerwash lightly. Suitable for sailboats and power boats."

"Unique among ablative bottom paints, the acrylic copolymer formula of Micron 66 with Biolux® reacts with saltwater at the paints surface to release biocide and prevent marine growth. Because the formula relies upon a chemical reaction and not water friction, Micron 66 is a great choice for boats that remain stationary in their slips for long periods of time. Micron 66 self-polishes and becomes smoother with use. This reduces drag and fuel consumption. The polishing action of this paint also reduces the need for sanding when the time comes to repaint. Unlike boats painted with traditional hard antifouling paints, boats painted with Micron 66 can also be hauled and re-launched without a need to repaint. NOTE: Micron 66 is not suitable for use in freshwater."

I keep my boat in the water 10 months out of the year in the lower Chesapeake Bay and in an average-to-high marine growth environment. I have always used "Interlux Micron Extra with Biolux" and have had very good results. One year I tried Micron 66 because I couldn't get the Micron Extra. The results were even better! When I hauled the boat at the end of the season the bottom looked like it did the day I launched it - smooth as a baby's ass! However here's the caveat - I found the Micron 66 is amazingly difficult to work with. It almost dries as it's going on and it skims over very quickly in the can or the tray.

Last edited by Black Magic 32; 11-03-2018 at 11:30 AM.
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