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Scuppers below the waterline the new normal ?

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Scuppers below the waterline the new normal ?

Old 08-16-2018, 07:50 PM
  #41  
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I always chalked this up to boats designed to hold 2-stroke motors now powered with heavier 4- strikes. Are newly deaigned boats still commonly placing the scuppers below waterline? Mine sit above.
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Old 02-05-2019, 04:14 PM
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isn't that why its called a water line???
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Old 02-05-2019, 04:32 PM
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I dont see it as a problem at all.
I want a boat that puts me close to the water when I'm in the cockpit so I can release a fish, wash my hand off in the water, etc. Only way to achieve this is with a lower deck that is only a little above the water line. With that criteria filled, the scuppers have to be under the water.

As stated above, alot of high end boats actually have the deck drains well below the waterline at the base of the transom. Why? Because if you take greenwater in this is the fastest way to get it out with the forward motion of the boat. It acts like a vacuum and sucks out the water. Use quality through hulls, check valves, hoses and hardware and keep it maintained and it wont be a problem.
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Old 02-05-2019, 07:28 PM
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​​​​​​​bottle caps,scales, seaweed, sand. Out the holes And water
1976K204x4 and Romeomikehotel like this.
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Old 02-05-2019, 07:34 PM
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Originally Posted by ebert View Post


bottle caps,scales, seaweed, sand. Out the holes And water
perfect design imo.

Looked at tons of boats while shopping. Below the waterline and that brand was immediately written off. No flaps or crazy ping pong ball designs.

The natural position had to be above water line
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Old 02-05-2019, 09:59 PM
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I’ll take my scuppers above the waterline and on the sides. I’m not a fan of those on the stern which backflow when backtrolling.
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Old 02-06-2019, 08:30 AM
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Having witnessed first hand the failure of a “self bailing” hull designed with drain below waterline, I wouldn’t buy a boat that didn’t have scuppers above the waterline.
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Old 02-06-2019, 08:51 AM
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Most of the bay boat designs have the scuppers well below the waterline out through the transom. For example, here's a Key West below. I've seen the same design on Pathfinders, Sea Hunts, etc. I'm not a fan, however my brother pointed out, how different is it than an in-deck livewell or a thru-hull transducer or raw-water wash-down or various other "below the waterline" fittings?

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Old 02-06-2019, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by q0rban View Post
Most of the bay boat designs have the scuppers well below the waterline out through the transom. For example, here's a Key West below. I've seen the same design on Pathfinders, Sea Hunts, etc. I'm not a fan, however my brother pointed out, how different is it than an in-deck livewell or a thru-hull transducer or raw-water wash-down or various other "below the waterline" fittings?
EXTREMELY!

All those fittings you mention are "usually" brass or marelon, containing seacocks or shut off valves. Scuppers are holes with flaps or ping pong ball contraptions.
Transducers are generally a big nut and bolt sealed up. The likely hood of failure between a brass valve and an open hole has to be quite different.
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Old 02-06-2019, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by willtim View Post
I own a Scout and I am sick and tired of wet feet.
Just use plugs in the drain when your fishing or at the sand bar.
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Old 02-06-2019, 09:00 AM
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Everyone is so worried about scuppers below the water line but what about your wash down system or live wells.
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Old 02-06-2019, 09:11 AM
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Raising the decks contribute to a higher center of gravity = a rocker.

Check valve may solve some of the problems out there. I have a True World Marine CC with twin two strokes. I get wet feet. Answer for now, plug the drains. Think I'll try the check valve as well.
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Old 02-06-2019, 09:13 AM
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I think the main difference is that livewells and other below the waterline thru hulls have seacocks, whereas scuppers are always left open. I'm one of those guys who always keeps the seacocks closed when not in use, but if you leave them open all the time then there's no difference. But a broken hose or failed hose clamp will eventually sink your boat...

I guess the other difference is the scupper thru hulls may be harder to get to and inspect. The above-the-waterline scupper outlets on my grady are pretty difficult to reach.


Originally Posted by q0rban View Post
Most of the bay boat designs have the scuppers well below the waterline out through the transom. For example, here's a Key West below. I've seen the same design on Pathfinders, Sea Hunts, etc. I'm not a fan, however my brother pointed out, how different is it than an in-deck livewell or a thru-hull transducer or raw-water wash-down or various other "below the waterline" fittings?

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Old 02-06-2019, 12:41 PM
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Some of you should just leave your boat at home. Putting it in the water is dangerous cause it might sink just looking at it.
Uninspected hoses/clamps sink more boats than anything.

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Old 02-06-2019, 02:13 PM
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Originally Posted by jtcwhaler View Post
I think the main difference is that livewells and other below the waterline thru hulls have seacocks, whereas scuppers are always left open. I'm one of those guys who always keeps the seacocks closed when not in use, but if you leave them open all the time then there's no difference. But a broken hose or failed hose clamp will eventually sink your boat...

I guess the other difference is the scupper thru hulls may be harder to get to and inspect. The above-the-waterline scupper outlets on my grady are pretty difficult to reach.

My scuppers drain through the transom like the Key West in the photo and I have a seacock on each one. Those seacocks are right next to the other ones so no more difficult to reach.
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Old 02-06-2019, 02:17 PM
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When the Robalo 246 first came out the scuppers came out the transom well below the water line.
I always worried about how it would drain when the boat wasn't under way.
Glad they switched to scuppers that come out the side. It drains perfectly. No wet feet at all.
I don't think I would have bought the boat if they didn't change that.

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Old 02-06-2019, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Commocean View Post
My uncle and I actually saved a Pathfinder from sinking in its slip. Same issue. It was raining, water collected in the back, the scuppers slowly went under, and the boat started to flood through the scuppers.
my boat went down twice this way. Intense rainfall pushed it past the point of no return. Now my boat gets used a tiny tiny fraction of what it does when I had it moored. As I save for a new boat the main thing I will be looking for is it being designed to love it’s life in the water
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Old 02-06-2019, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by fishdat1 View Post
When the Robalo 246 first came out the scuppers came out the transom well below the water line.
I always worried about how it would drain when the boat wasn't under way.
Glad they switched to scuppers that come out the side. It drains perfectly. No wet feet at all.
I don't think I would have bought the boat if they didn't change that.
I don’t get it. That scupper will be under water more than it’s not, unless your always in perfectly calm water and no one ever stands right there.
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Old 02-06-2019, 02:32 PM
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Most scupper issues come from debris getting through the strainer or lack of a strainer. The only time I ever saw a scupper get jammed open was because it had 100’s of June bugs inside. Keep them covered when not in use and don’t let bait and trash get in there. Boats need constant maintenance and this is no different.
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Old 02-06-2019, 02:38 PM
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Everything is a trade off. If you don't want your scuppers under water than your gunnel height on a bay boat would be less than knee high.
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