The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum

Go Back   >
Search


Like Tree72Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-12-2018, 05:26 PM   #121
Admirals Club
Thread Starter
iTrader: (1)
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 15,327
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LMorgan View Post
Find a deal on a used name brand. Chandler, Juki, Singer, Rimoldi, Pfaff, etc. They last forever with minimal maintenance. I use my 20+ year old machine daily and it would sew right through your grandmother. Oil it weekly. Quality hardened steel parts. Only thing I ever replace is the needle. It get timed and tuned once a year (by me). Don't buy junk. Wait for a deal on the right machine.
In a perfect world I'd like to find a walking foot, zig-zag and straight machine that is good quality. I'd love to find a good used one -- my biggest fear is what if it needs to have the timing set, etc. (I'm guessing there's a YouTube video for that? LOL)....

I don't want to spend $400+ on a used older machine, only to realize I could have spent a little more and bought the $700 from Sailrite?... but on the other hand, if I can find a used one that is as good or better than the Sailrite, for less money?... then I'm in!!

A little secret. I've been cleaning and organizing my garage all day (shelving, etc.). Why? Well... first, it looked like a disaster zone. Second? Well... I'll be you can guess.
OldPete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2018, 07:20 PM   #122
Admirals Club
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Richmond & Kilmarnock, VA
Posts: 5,626
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by OldPete View Post
In a perfect world I'd like to find a walking foot, zig-zag and straight machine that is good quality. I'd love to find a good used one -- my biggest fear is what if it needs to have the timing set, etc. (I'm guessing there's a YouTube video for that? LOL)....

I don't want to spend $400+ on a used older machine, only to realize I could have spent a little more and bought the $700 from Sailrite?... but on the other hand, if I can find a used one that is as good or better than the Sailrite, for less money?... then I'm in!!

A little secret. I've been cleaning and organizing my garage all day (shelving, etc.). Why? Well... first, it looked like a disaster zone. Second? Well... I'll be you can guess.
7 years ago I was in your position, with these exact objectives. Never found that Unicorn. Almost pulled the trigger on the Sailrite machine, but just couldn't justify it. Never found a used professional walking foot machine for under $1000, so I bought the $400 knock off. Still use it occasionally, but it's not as much fun as working with a fine machine.

I do have a fine household machine, a vintage Morse portable. It does variable stitch length, zig-zag, etc. I use it for light canvas work, and it works great for that. It will sew 3 or 4 layers of Sunbrella. But it will not handle vinyl windows and struggles at corners where you might get more than 4 layers. So it good for some stuff, but has limitations. It is a pleasure to use, smooth and quiet. The sailrite knock-off walking foot machine sounds like a shopping cart full of tin cans being pushed down the sidewalk.
Buoy Scout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2018, 05:29 AM   #123
Admirals Club
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: DeBary, Fl
Posts: 404
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by OldPete View Post
In a perfect world I'd like to find a walking foot, zig-zag and straight machine that is good quality. I'd love to find a good used one -- my biggest fear is what if it needs to have the timing set, etc. (I'm guessing there's a YouTube video for that? LOL)....

I don't want to spend $400+ on a used older machine, only to realize I could have spent a little more and bought the $700 from Sailrite?... but on the other hand, if I can find a used one that is as good or better than the Sailrite, for less money?... then I'm in!!
A quality used commercial machine for $400-600 is a better deal than a new $700 sailrite machine. If you find one, sew on it before you buy it to verify that it works right. If you wind up needing repairs, there are a lot of locals that time and adjust machines. It's not that difficult. If you buy junk, you'll just be mad that you have junk and wind up spending more on a better machine. Spend the money on quality. Don't worry if it's an older machine. There's a shop near me still using (daily) a machine from the 50's. They run perfect.
LMorgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2018, 05:37 AM   #124
Admirals Club
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: DeBary, Fl
Posts: 404
Default

Old Pete....this one is an hour from you...

https://treasure.craigslist.org/art/...408327735.html
LMorgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2018, 08:03 PM   #125
Admirals Club
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 2
Default

Aloha Old Pete,

Yes you an buy an old used machine for $650 or you can buy a new industrial machine with table and servo motor which are slow and smooth starting and finishing. Clutch models can be tricky and require some practice. We use a Consew 206RB5 walking foot with servo in our canvas shop. Purchased from Zamir Sewing in Los Angles this year for $1,150 brand new. Our last one was approximately 19 years old and sold on mainland. Enjoy your sewing investment. Mahaloz
Bikini Kim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2018, 08:09 PM   #126
Admirals Club
Thread Starter
iTrader: (1)
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 15,327
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LMorgan View Post
Old Pete....this one is an hour from you...

https://treasure.craigslist.org/art/...408327735.html
Thanks.... reading on that model - does it do zig-zag?...
OldPete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2018, 09:32 PM   #127
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 184
Default

Yes, I have Singer. ...my boys laugh, but the bolsters I made for my Formula came out darn nice, as well as the cushion for cooler, you are right, it's relaxing...
reelbrothers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2018, 07:41 AM   #128
Admirals Club
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: DeBary, Fl
Posts: 404
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by OldPete View Post
Thanks.... reading on that model - does it do zig-zag?...
No need for zig zag unless you're making sails for a sail boat or parachutes. I've had an upholstery shop for 24 years and have never needed a zig zag machine. Had one once because I got a deal on it. Sat in my shop unused for 4 years until I sold it to a sail shop. I tried to use it...just could never come up with an application for it's need (and 80% of my work is marine).
LMorgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2018, 08:50 AM   #129
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Ojai, Ca
Posts: 3,004
Default

Lose my man card? I can create what I want in fabric, canvas, leather, wood, fiberglass, and steel, I'm more of a man than someone who can't
NedLloyd likes this.
805gregg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2018, 07:29 PM   #130
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 2,017
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LMorgan View Post
No need for zig zag unless you're making sails for a sail boat or parachutes. I've had an upholstery shop for 24 years and have never needed a zig zag machine. Had one once because I got a deal on it. Sat in my shop unused for 4 years until I sold it to a sail shop. I tried to use it...just could never come up with an application for it's need (and 80% of my work is marine).
Would a Singer like this be good enough to start? Model 237M-A or 328K.

https://baltimore.craigslist.org/atq/d/antiques-singer-sewing/6453656774.html

https://lancaster.craigslist.org/for/d/singer-328k-heavy-duty-sewing/6456807141.html

Or more like this?
https://baltimore.craigslist.org/hsh/d/singer-107w1-commercial/6439032847.html
davepjr71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2018, 06:08 AM   #131
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Huntington NY
Posts: 352
Default

A few years ago there was an excellent tread here on THT by a guy who brought a cheap sewing machine and proceeded to make some excellent cushions for his center console.

Sewing vinyl is probably the most challenging material to sew and if you can do it with a cheap machine you may not need to invest big dollars on a sail rite sewing machine.
davepjr71 likes this.
Katrina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2018, 06:26 AM   #132
Admirals Club
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: DeBary, Fl
Posts: 404
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by davepjr71 View Post
No on the first two. Maybe the third if it's a walking foot machine or if what you're sewing isn't too heavy, such as light cloth or Sunbrella canvas.
LMorgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2018, 06:44 AM   #133
Admirals Club
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: DeBary, Fl
Posts: 404
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katrina View Post
A few years ago there was an excellent tread here on THT by a guy who brought a cheap sewing machine and proceeded to make some excellent cushions for his center console.

Sewing vinyl is probably the most challenging material to sew and if you can do it with a cheap machine you may not need to invest big dollars on a sail rite sewing machine.
This is what I was referring to in the earlier post. Please take it from someone who has been in the profession for the last 25 years. Vinyl is not the most challenging material. The toughest to sew and maintain the proper marking is leather (for heavy materials). The thread may have been interesting, but that doesn't mean it was right (full disclosure: I haven't seen the thread).

Yes, you can sew small cushions with a home machine. But there are issues doing it this way. The needle diameter is too small to allow the use of heavy threads. The larger number of thread size, the heavier the thread. Home machines typically use #33 to #46. Commercial machines use #92 to #138. Heavier threads are NECESSARY to maintain the integrity of the stitching during exposure to rain, sun, sweat, scrubbing with detergents & brushes, and the use of corrosives like bleach and hull cleaners. Small home machines are made for lightweight use like clothing that don't get the abuse like that. Aside from that, the smaller machines don't have the ass to sew through multiple layers of heavier material. Think bent needles, skipped stitches, and broken thread.

Another problem is that the stitches are much too close together. Spacing the stitches father apart allows (roughly 5-7/inch) maintains a minimal amount of damage to the material. When using a home machine, your stitches run up >12/inch, basically perforating it like a stamp. When the cushion gets a little abuse, it tears easily on the perforations. I have seen this a ton of times when we fix DIY issues.

So, here's the bottom line. You can either spend a little more (maybe not much if you wait for the right deal) and do it right the first time, or you can skip the posts that don't agree with what you want to do and simply look for the ones that reinforce a decision you've already made. Then you get to spend more later on either the right machine or paying a professional to do it for you.
OldPete likes this.
LMorgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2018, 07:52 AM   #134
Admirals Club
Thread Starter
iTrader: (1)
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 15,327
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LMorgan View Post
This is what I was referring to in the earlier post. Please take it from someone who has been in the profession for the last 25 years. Vinyl is not the most challenging material. The toughest to sew and maintain the proper marking is leather (for heavy materials). The thread may have been interesting, but that doesn't mean it was right (full disclosure: I haven't seen the thread).

Yes, you can sew small cushions with a home machine. But there are issues doing it this way. The needle diameter is too small to allow the use of heavy threads. The larger number of thread size, the heavier the thread. Home machines typically use #33 to #46. Commercial machines use #92 to #138. Heavier threads are NECESSARY to maintain the integrity of the stitching during exposure to rain, sun, sweat, scrubbing with detergents & brushes, and the use of corrosives like bleach and hull cleaners. Small home machines are made for lightweight use like clothing that don't get the abuse like that. Aside from that, the smaller machines don't have the ass to sew through multiple layers of heavier material. Think bent needles, skipped stitches, and broken thread.

Another problem is that the stitches are much too close together. Spacing the stitches father apart allows (roughly 5-7/inch) maintains a minimal amount of damage to the material. When using a home machine, your stitches run up >12/inch, basically perforating it like a stamp. When the cushion gets a little abuse, it tears easily on the perforations. I have seen this a ton of times when we fix DIY issues.

So, here's the bottom line. You can either spend a little more (maybe not much if you wait for the right deal) and do it right the first time, or you can skip the posts that don't agree with what you want to do and simply look for the ones that reinforce a decision you've already made. Then you get to spend more later on either the right machine or paying a professional to do it for you.
Interesting on the # of stitches per inch and how it ends up being a perforating scenario!... never thought of it like that.
OldPete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2018, 08:13 AM   #135
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: englewood, florida
Posts: 4,757
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katrina View Post
A few years ago there was an excellent tread here on THT by a guy who brought a cheap sewing machine and proceeded to make some excellent cushions for his center console.

Sewing vinyl is probably the most challenging material to sew and if you can do it with a cheap machine you may not need to invest big dollars on a sail rite sewing machine.
I posted it earlier in the thread but i'm guessing a few missed it...

https://www.thehulltruth.com/boating...ning-post.html
bladenbullet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2018, 09:24 AM   #136
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 2,017
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bladenbullet View Post
I posted it earlier in the thread but i'm guessing a few missed it...

https://www.thehulltruth.com/boating...ning-post.html

I remember this and subscribed to it.
davepjr71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2018, 01:08 PM   #137
Admirals Club
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: DeBary, Fl
Posts: 404
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bladenbullet View Post
I posted it earlier in the thread but i'm guessing a few missed it...

https://www.thehulltruth.com/boating...ning-post.html
I went thru the thread and it didn't show any close up pics of the stitching. Here are a couple samples showing the difference (sorry for the poor quality). Look at the difference between the thread diameter and stitch length in a home machine vs a commercial machine.
Attached Images
  
LMorgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:14 AM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
©2009 TheHullTruth.com

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.9.3.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.