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Coast Guard: Don't operate lake boats on the ocean?

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Coast Guard: Don't operate lake boats on the ocean?

Old 11-21-2017, 03:08 PM
  #41  
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Waiting for a 22'CC built for the ocean to get caught on lake Erie and see what they say.
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Old 11-21-2017, 05:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Re-Bait View Post
2. Pontoon boaters should be made to sign a special contract promising not to go onto the oceans!


I saw one heading out of the mouth of the Merrimack. Crazy.
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Old 11-21-2017, 06:00 PM
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Originally Posted by GaryDoug View Post
4-woman crew operating a 47' MLB rescues 4 men. Love it!
Where did you read it was a all female crew? Maybe I just missed it. I'd tell that bm3 chick to pound sand.
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Old 11-21-2017, 07:04 PM
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Originally Posted by SeaSquid631 View Post
Where did you read it was a all female crew? Maybe I just missed it. I'd tell that bm3 chick to pound sand.

I looked at the dock photo in the link. If we include the female first class petty officer taking the photo, that makes 4. Could be more I guess.
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Old 11-21-2017, 07:37 PM
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I'm not saying that boat should be out there but it didn't take any waves over the bow and even at anchor was holding it's own. So apparently it was big enough. Its more about the driver than the boat in a lot of situations but it would have stayed on the trailer if it were mine.
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Old 11-21-2017, 10:38 PM
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Originally Posted by OR Boater View Post
I'm only a calm-weather lake boater, so I have to ask... What is a lake boat, as opposed to an ocean boat? I can see that this particular guy is in over his head, but I thought boats were boats... obviously you need different equipment on board, depending on how far offshore you're going, and you're not going to take a small boat out in big seas. But is there really such a thing as a "lake boat"?
There are design features that make some boats more seaworthy than others. Features like self bailing decks/hulls/transoms help keep water on the right side of the boat. Bowriders can be swamped much easier when the water gets rough especially if you stuff the bow or take on a decent breaker.

Boats with a lot of freeboard help keep the water out, a wider beam increases stability, the angle of deadrise affects how it rides in rough water. A deep vee handles waves better and provides a softer ride than a flat bottom. Power and agility are important too. You need power in a following sea and power and agility to outrun waves when need be.

A single engine setup is also not ideal, at least not without a kicker that is capable of bringing you back in. In open water a second engine is the difference between being stranded or limping home on one engine. You don't want to be "dead" in the water during bad weather or you may end up dead in the water.

That's just my opinion I'm no expert by any means. Manufacturers specify which boats are designed for off shore/near shore/inland use.
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Old 11-22-2017, 07:43 PM
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Originally Posted by The Marine Foreman View Post
Bowriders can be swamped much easier when the water gets rough especially if you stuff the bow or take on a decent breaker.
Of course, but the same holds true for a CC doesn't it? Maybe even more so, since more water can enter faster. And we have recently seen a video of just that happening on this forum.
Rough Inlet Broach
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Last edited by GaryDoug; 11-22-2017 at 07:57 PM.
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Old 11-22-2017, 08:21 PM
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This happened in August. Classic example of a freshwater boat in the wrong place. They were only two miles off the So Cal coast and got swamped by a wind swell. Trust me when I say the pics don't do the situation any justice: They were lucky I was there.


Sunday I came upon these guys clinging to a swamped aluminum bass boat 150 feet from the oil rig in front of sunset aquatic marina. I motored over to their location and saw they were close to getting smashed on the rig pilings. I told them to abandon their vessel and to swim to my boat but they refused. They wanted me to tow them in. I refused and again told them to swim to my boat and get aboard. They were completely exhausted and mentally confused and getting pissed that I wouldn't tow their boat. No reasoning whatsoever so I told them I'd "tow" their vessel just to get them away from the oil rig. The wind was blowing at 15kts and the wind waves were pushing their boat fast towards the pilings. I couldnt get close enough because there was rope floating in the water around their boat and I knew if i fouled my prop, I'd be done too. I wasn't able to assist because I had to stay at the helm to maintain my position. They finally half ass secured a line and one of the guys somehow managed to swim to my boat and climb in and secure (tangle) their tow line around my rear cleat. If I had been a minute later, I would have been watching 3 dudes die. Once I was a safe distance away from the rig and maintaining a heading for the sheltered waters of the breakwall, I used my radio for a distress call and the Coast Guard dispatched a rescue boat that came and snatched them out of the water. Athough they were only a mile or so off land, nobody knew they were there in trouble. One of the guys was clinching a soaked cell phone when he boarded the rescue boat. If this doesn't put things into perspective, I don't know what does. The ocean will kill you if you don't respect it.
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Old 11-22-2017, 08:29 PM
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Too little freeboard but at least it didn't sink.
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Old 11-23-2017, 04:10 AM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by SSN651 View Post
Why are their fenders out?
So you can tell they are kooks.
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Old 11-23-2017, 06:49 AM
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Originally Posted by lakemonster1 View Post
This happened in August. Classic example of a freshwater boat in the wrong place. They were only two miles off the So Cal coast and got swamped by a wind swell. Trust me when I say the pics don't do the situation any justice: They were lucky I was there.


Sunday I came upon these guys clinging to a swamped aluminum bass boat 150 feet from the oil rig in front of sunset aquatic marina. I motored over to their location and saw they were close to getting smashed on the rig pilings. I told them to abandon their vessel and to swim to my boat but they refused. They wanted me to tow them in. I refused and again told them to swim to my boat and get aboard. They were completely exhausted and mentally confused and getting pissed that I wouldn't tow their boat. No reasoning whatsoever so I told them I'd "tow" their vessel just to get them away from the oil rig. The wind was blowing at 15kts and the wind waves were pushing their boat fast towards the pilings. I couldnt get close enough because there was rope floating in the water around their boat and I knew if i fouled my prop, I'd be done too. I wasn't able to assist because I had to stay at the helm to maintain my position. They finally half ass secured a line and one of the guys somehow managed to swim to my boat and climb in and secure (tangle) their tow line around my rear cleat. If I had been a minute later, I would have been watching 3 dudes die. Once I was a safe distance away from the rig and maintaining a heading for the sheltered waters of the breakwall, I used my radio for a distress call and the Coast Guard dispatched a rescue boat that came and snatched them out of the water. Athough they were only a mile or so off land, nobody knew they were there in trouble. One of the guys was clinching a soaked cell phone when he boarded the rescue boat. If this doesn't put things into perspective, I don't know what does. The ocean will kill you if you don't respect it.


Are you with the Seal Beach Lifeguard? Cool job!
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Old 11-23-2017, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by C3D View Post
Are you with the Seal Beach Lifeguard? Cool job!
Thank you. No. Just a private boater that couldn't just stand by and watch three guys lose their lives. I was ridiculed on another site for putting myself in harm's way to rescue these idiots but I did what I felt was necessary. I knew the risk of tying their vessel to mine but did it to get them away from the oil rig.
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Old 11-23-2017, 10:51 AM
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Originally Posted by GaryDoug View Post
Of course, but the same holds true for a CC doesn't it? Maybe even more so, since more water can enter faster. And we have recently seen a video of just that happening on this forum.
Rough Inlet Broach
Yes it does even with self bailing decks they can easily take on more water then they can shed before the next big wave breaks over the bow again. I would say a bowrider without self bailing features would be worse than a CC. In that video he looks low in the water and bow heavy. I don't know the details but it looks as if he was taking on water and trying to make it as close to shore as possible before it went down.
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Old 11-23-2017, 06:45 PM
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In a bowrider, you typically have a single space just wide enough to walk through. In a CC, you have two of those. So you have twice the potential water flow from the front to the back. You also can keep the windshield center section closed most of the time and block the water further. Also the bowrider usually has more, larger and thicker seats taking up space that the water could occupy in a CC.
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Old 11-23-2017, 07:13 PM
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Originally Posted by GaryDoug View Post
In a bowrider, you typically have a single space just wide enough to walk through. In a CC, you have two of those. So you have twice the potential water flow from the front to the back. You also can keep the windshield center section closed most of the time and block the water further. Also the bowrider usually has more, larger and thicker seats taking up space that the water could occupy in a CC.
Are you saying that the entire marine industry has the whole saltwater center console thing wrong? Did I read that correctly?
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Old 11-23-2017, 07:20 PM
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Originally Posted by TIMarine View Post
Are you saying that the entire marine industry has the whole saltwater center console thing wrong? Did I read that correctly?
Strange. I don't remember typing that or even hinting it. Perhaps you should reread it.
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Old 11-23-2017, 07:39 PM
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Originally Posted by GaryDoug View Post
In a bowrider, you typically have a single space just wide enough to walk through. In a CC, you have two of those. So you have twice the potential water flow from the front to the back. You also can keep the windshield center section closed most of the time and block the water further. Also the bowrider usually has more, larger and thicker seats taking up space that the water could occupy in a CC.
If you keep the windshield up on a bowrider it doesn’t do you any good if there’s a gaping hole where the seats in the bow are. If an I/O boat stuffs the bow, and it’s not self bailing, all that water is going right into the bilge. Possibly killing the engine and leaving you a sitting duck. Don’t try and justify the fact that those 4 guys were complete idiots. They had no business being out there in any small boat, but maybe if they weren’t in a lake boat they would’ve been able to make their way back to the dock.
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Old 11-23-2017, 07:46 PM
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I have a 20' bowrider and my neighbor has a 20' CC. Normally I keep the boat on a lift, but had to leave it in the water overnight because of a very low tide that afternoon They were both tied to our nearby docks at the same time that a winter storm hit with over 60 MPH winds. The wind came from the sides of both boats. His boat sunk; mine only got the carpet wet.

Everyone here tries to blame the bowrider design, but almost every CC boat I have seen is also a bowrider with a very open cockpit front and rear. Simple truth. If you don't like it, too bad.
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Old 11-23-2017, 08:27 PM
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Originally Posted by GaryDoug View Post
I have a 20' bowrider and my neighbor has a 20' CC. Normally I keep the boat on a lift, but had to leave it in the water overnight because of a very low tide that afternoon They were both tied to our nearby docks at the same time that a winter storm hit with over 60 MPH winds. The wind came from the sides of both boats. His boat sunk; mine only got the carpet wet.

Everyone here tries to blame the bowrider design, but almost every CC boat I have seen is also a bowrider with a very open cockpit front and rear. Simple truth. If you don't like it, too bad.
So you are saying that the whole industry has it wrong. You know better. I guess you must’ve been on vacation up here last weekend.
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Old 11-23-2017, 09:19 PM
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Originally Posted by GaryDoug View Post
In a bowrider, you typically have a single space just wide enough to walk through. In a CC, you have two of those. So you have twice the potential water flow from the front to the back. You also can keep the windshield center section closed most of the time and block the water further. Also the bowrider usually has more, larger and thicker seats taking up space that the water could occupy in a CC.
My bowrider has a self bailing bow section. There is no bilge but I'm still adding a pump by the drain plug. Offshore CC boats usually have self bailing features also more deadrise and freeboard.





Originally Posted by GaryDoug View Post
Of course, but the same holds true for a CC doesn't it? Maybe even more so, since more water can enter faster. And we have recently seen a video of just that happening on this forum.
Rough Inlet Broach
Here is the video of that CC capsizing and videos of other CC boats in the same inlet. Look at the difference in waterline on the hulls. That boat sank because it was taking on water and became too heavy to stay up on plane. Once the following sea stuffed the bow that was all she wrote.





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