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SeaSport Boats?

Old 12-26-2015, 11:36 AM
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Default SeaSport Boats?

I'm looking at their Sportsman 2200 pilothouse, but have a lot of questions their site doesn't answer. Horsepower requirements, type of coring used, performance numbers, type of gas tank, etc.

For current or former SeaSport owners, what's your general experience and satisfaction level?

I was surprised at both the weight and the 22" (motor up) draft, and since I do lots of anchoring, the deep-vee hull looks like it would be pretty tippy at rest, but they don't offer a modified-vee alternate, like Steiger does. (I think Parker, too), plus the closest dealer is in Florida, and I'm just south of Montreal.

Also, some ballpark pricing?
Old 12-26-2015, 02:52 PM
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To get more info on SeaSports, you can check Waypoint Marine's website. They have some used boats for sale at http://waypointmarinegroup.com/pre-owned-boats/ but they also sell new SeaSports, C-Dorys, etc.

Older SeaSports are almost all I/Os, but the newer models are usually O/B-powered. I/O versions have built-in cabin heat & defog, but diesel heaters can be added to O/B versions.

The basic hull design is the same from 22' to 26'. All have 8'6" beam, 22° deadrise, and a wood-cored glass hull. They all have two fuel tanks that run length-wise on either side of the cockpit.

Weight depends on added content: the bare-bones fishing models don't have a lot of creature comforts, and are lighter than the more cruising-oriented models (like mine) that have a porcelain head, fridge, microwave. sink, hot water tank. etc.

Fuel economy is decent: I've averaged ~2.05 NMPG with an old 280-hp TBI 350 I/O. Minimum planing speed is 18-20 kn, and I usually cruise at 24-26 kn for best mpg.

The center of mass is fairly low, so they're not overly tippy at rest, but they are very sensitive to lateral weight distribution on plane. If I have people walking around at cruise, I run with one hand on the wheel and the other hand on the tab controls.

Build quality is excellent. I couldn't be happier with mine.

Based on your comments in other posts, you should take a close look at C-Dory boats as well. They are made by the same people as SeaSports, and they have an avid (near-fanatical) following.

C-Dorys are lighter and less tender on plane than SeaSports, and can plane at considerably lower speeds, but they will pound in light-to-moderate chop at speeds that a SeaSport will handle easily. Several THTers have C-Dory experience. At least a couple have cruised comfortably from Seattle to Alaska in small C-Dorys, and that's a ringing endorsement on its own.
Old 12-26-2015, 02:59 PM
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Yes, I'm replying to my own thread. I just did some poking around, and find that SeaSport now owns at least 5 brands. Like several boat builders, they brag about being a "family owned" company" for XXX years, or "since 1955" or whatever.

Might have been family owned, but they fail to mention it's not the SAME family...ditto for Maritime, formally of Maine, now New Hampshire...still claiming "family owned since....", but neglect to say it was 3 different families.

http://static-tradeonlytoday-wp.s3.a...asport0623.pdf

One of the SeaSport brands is now C-Dory, which has had a long history of declaring bankruptcy about every four years, then having a family member buy back the name, assets, and molds at auction for 10-cents on the dollar, and wiping out all debt and warranty obligations. There have been C-Dory boats already in dealer inventory that got sold to customers, with zero warranty since they were built under different company ownership.

It makes me skeptical of SeaSport, C-Dory, and Maritime.
Old 12-26-2015, 03:52 PM
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I maximize my bang for the buck by buying used boats, so a company's warranty shenanigans don't mean anything to me. I focused on capabilities and build quality, and like many Sea Sport and C-Dory owners, I was not disappointed.

I do know that I can still buy certain parts (like an aft console) for my 16-year-old Seasport directly from the factory, so I have no complaints in that regard.
Old 12-26-2015, 06:10 PM
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Something to be aware of with both the Seasports and C Dories is that they have step-down cabins from the rear deck. It's good for windage and COG, but you do have to duck your head going in and out of the house. It also allows for a self bailing rear deck on the smaller boats without making the cabin profile too high. Everything is a compromise.
Old 12-26-2015, 08:21 PM
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General comments: I would go smaller than older, on same budget. Boats 16 years old are beyond my consideration.

Headroom is a consideration, too, as I'm 6'6", and realize that with most pilothouse boats I won't be able to drive fully standing, but possibly leaning with a bolster-type seat, which will also need a suspension base or pedestal, due to spinal injuries. I'll be looking for suspension in the $500 range, not the $15K mil-spec active computer-controlled models our govt. is fond of buying.

I would also consider a pilothouse RIB, but most are way beyond my means.
Old 12-26-2015, 10:14 PM
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Another point to mention is the limited visibility out the forward windows till your well on plane and doing better than 20+ knots. You can only be on your tippy-toes so much.
Old 12-27-2015, 02:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Karl in NY View Post
Headroom is a consideration, too, as I'm 6'6", and realize that with most pilothouse boats I won't be able to drive fully standing, but possibly leaning with a bolster-type seat, which will also need a suspension base or pedestal, due to spinal injuries.
I don't know how well a SeaSport would work for you. I measured my cabin headroom at 6' 4". Also, the seat is normally mounted directly on a cabinet, which means a suspension seat would push the seat cushion pretty high for a 6-1/2-footer.

Parkers have floor-pedestal seats, and look like they may have decent headroom.
Old 12-27-2015, 09:05 AM
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I've owned a 24' SeaSport - older version - 1990 and now own a 1992 22' C-Dory. They're both popular in the Pacific NW (they're made there...). Six footers might not find them the best size - I'm 5'6" and fine although being an inch or so taller might help. They both are well built, simple boats. On both boats the internal fittings (windows, doors, latches) are original and working well.

The idiot that bought the SeaSport off the guy I sold it to managed to sink it twice (at the harbor) and roll it off the trailer (at 5 mph). It's a bit worse for the wear these days but still bopping around. My C-Dory is currently getting a wiring refit - my winter project.

SeaSports are heavier construction - you can beat the crap out them (witness my former boat) and they keep going. Until the current crop of aluminum boats became popular, the 27 foot Pilots were a standard charter boat. The older Volva outdrives are ... well, Volvo outdrives. I replaced the engine with a 2006 model and was perfectly happy with it except for it's love affair with the fuel dock.

The C-Dory is a much lighter, beamier boat. I miss the heavier construction and better heavy water handling of the SeaSport at times but I really like the fact that the fuel economy is about double. Can't have everything.

The company has been very helpful for sourcing wiring diagrams, sources of original parts, etc. The C-brat community is pretty fanatic. But your height might be an issue. Perhaps get your back surgeon to remove a couple of annoying vertebrae.
Old 12-27-2015, 12:42 PM
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I prefer pedestal seats, despite the waste of potential storage space.

From experience, especially with my atypical body dimensions, I also like adjustable seat height, and fore and aft adjustment, and seat bases that swivel.

As I type this, I'm seated in a fully-optioned Herman Miller Aeron chair...so many times I feel tempted to buy and modify another one as a captain's seat, mounted on a pedestal with internal spring and shock absorber. Just having adjustable lumbar support is a blessing, and these chairs actually come in 3 sizes for different body types, but, certainly not Walmart priced. Mine was about $1300, and my employer provided one for work, after filing an ADA reasonable accommodation application and doctor's note. The boss was not pleased, as it triggered many other employees to follow my lead.
Old 12-28-2015, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Karl in NY View Post
Might have been family owned, but they fail to mention it's not the SAME family...ditto for Maritime, formally of Maine, now New Hampshire...still claiming "family owned since....", but neglect to say it was 3 different families.



It makes me skeptical of SeaSport, C-Dory, and Maritime.
Karl - just a FYI on Maritime, and I know from reading your posts that you could tell me 10x more than I know about Maritime....when I bought the 2010, I emailed Maritime about the warranty....I was informed that "Kenway Corp was the previous owner of the company and they remain committed to your warranty." and "records have been diligently kept on every boat built so the warranty will be honored without a problem." This came from current ownership. If a problem were to actually come up (knock on wood) hopefully they honor this.

Love my Challenger.
Old 12-28-2015, 12:50 PM
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I wanted to add one more tid-bit of info. Be careful of hull years before 2002. I have done countless installs on older sea sports and remember there is little to no visibility above the tiny dash to add a plotter. Make sure who ever you request pics from has a pic from the view of the drivers dash. If you find very few from a particular boat, there may be a reason why.
Old 12-28-2015, 01:52 PM
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Originally Posted by CME View Post
I wanted to add one more tid-bit of info. Be careful of hull years before 2002. I have done countless installs on older sea sports and remember there is little to no visibility above the tiny dash to add a plotter. Make sure who ever you request pics from has a pic from the view of the drivers dash. If you find very few from a particular boat, there may be a reason why.
Interesting comment... I've been running a pre-2002 SeaSport with a C90W beside a couple of other plotters. Recently, I had the C90W, a Garmin 720, and a Garmin 546 all mounted on the dash.

I'm replacing the 720 and 546 plotters with a Garmin 7212. That's about my upper limit on plotter size that allows me to see out of the front windows. But the 7212 is a very tall plotter, as tall as an NSS16 evo2. A newer widescreen 12" plotter like a Furuno TZT2-12 can provide lots of screen area and still allow good visibility.

The pic below is taken from slightly below and significantly to the left of my normal viewing position.

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Last edited by yabbut; 12-28-2015 at 04:29 PM.
Old 12-28-2015, 02:06 PM
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We have a ton of 4-6' seas here, nearly daily, and after dialing in autopilots in older Seasport boats, one thing definitely comes to mind. Any seas, other than flat, it's very difficult to see past plotters on the dash. Of course, the issue is trying desperately to stay on plane in those conditions! Yikes.
Old 12-28-2015, 03:06 PM
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We have our share of 4-6' seas, too. I try to stay away from them, so I don't see those challenging conditions as often as you do.

I try to place the plotters and myself so the plotters just obscure my forward view of the bow. I don't need to see my own bow (like I don't need to see my own rear sheetmetal when I'm adjusting side mirrors in a car).

If the plotters just barely cover the bow, then they aren't blocking my view of the water -- the bow is blocking my view. SeaSports have high bows, which can limit visibility when running just off plane in higher seas.

SeaSports also have relatively low upper edges on the outer front windows, so when the boat is pitched down in heavy seas, it's not always easy to see the crest of the wave ahead (without ducking).

Obviously, all boats have compromises. The SeaSports' long, low roofline is great for roof access to dinghies, crab traps, etc., but it limits upward visibility. The high bow works great to keep green water off the front windows, but it limits downward visibility. The high dash is a byproduct of a roomy vee-berth, but it limits how tall a plotter you can use before blocking your water view.

Here's a pic from closer to my normal viewpoint, showing a front view pitched up toward the crest of a good-size swell. You can see how the C90W, which is about the same height as a Garmin 7610, doesn't fully obscure the bow.

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Old 12-28-2015, 06:14 PM
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Originally Posted by CME View Post
We have a ton of 4-6' seas here, nearly daily, and after dialing in autopilots in older Seasport boats, one thing definitely comes to mind. Any seas, other than flat, it's very difficult to see past plotters on the dash.
Also, if someone found a killer deal on an older SeaSport, but needed a giant plotter, they could buy a new-style forward console and put the plotter there.

As far as I can tell, the consoles (forward and aft) are bolted in place, not glassed in. Since the designs haven't changed much in the past ~20 years, I could change my pre-2002 Explorer over to the new console if I wanted to.
Old 12-28-2015, 06:55 PM
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standing up in front of the helm isn't an option on the SeaSports. The floor is raised. Only standing is in the isle way in the center of the cabin.

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