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outboards vs. inboards

Old 07-06-2015, 06:40 PM
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Default outboards vs. inboards

Hi, looking for opinions/pro's& cons comparing outboards vs inboards. I've always owned outboards, typically twins. Looking now at a new vessal with twin inboards. Thanks in advance for the help
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Old 07-06-2015, 06:44 PM
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are they straight up inboards or I/O?
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Old 07-06-2015, 07:13 PM
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Go with straight inboards. Less maintenance, more reliable drive train. Cleaner set up with the engines under the deck and the props under the hull. If you go with twins check on the access to the engines.
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Old 07-06-2015, 07:46 PM
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The outboards are easier to work on, most times bilge access makes it difficult for certain systems on inboards. I have an older boat with twin inboards, engines that I know how to work with so I'll take the beating when I need to pack a stuffing box or change a part on the outboard side of the engines rather than pay the big buck for maintenance.
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Old 07-06-2015, 07:54 PM
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I like inboards.
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Old 07-06-2015, 08:00 PM
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Originally Posted by AMac19 View Post
Hi, looking for opinions/pro's& cons comparing outboards vs inboards. I've always owned outboards, typically twins. Looking now at a new vessal with twin inboards. Thanks in advance for the help
Depends on your application and the type of boat. Twin screws have always had a great reputation.
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Old 07-06-2015, 08:08 PM
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Inboards get you a nod of respect
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Old 07-06-2015, 08:13 PM
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all of the above. So much depends on your areas of travel. An inboard in the shallows? An outboard for offshore deep water? See what I mean. if you go inboard, consider diesel. Bigger initial cost but more reliable, safer fuel, and longevity.
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Old 07-06-2015, 08:27 PM
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Originally Posted by AMac19 View Post
Hi, looking for opinions/pro's& cons comparing outboards vs inboards. I've always owned outboards, typically twins. Looking now at a new vessal with twin inboards. Thanks in advance for the help
the answer really depends on the boat you are looking at.
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Old 07-06-2015, 08:32 PM
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Originally Posted by mercrewser View Post
Inboards get you a nod of respect
I haven't noticed that yet.
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Old 07-06-2015, 08:44 PM
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Outboards are faster per horse power, more fuel-efficient, and safer. Longevity wise you don't have an automotive iron block waiting to corrode in your bilge either. This day in age outboards rule the roost.

Oh yeah. Here is one reason http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/lo...311654021.html

Last edited by iFishMD; 07-07-2015 at 08:57 AM.
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Old 07-06-2015, 08:52 PM
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Outboard boats are faster because outboard boats are lighter, but in the slop everyone is going at 18 knots. Guess which one will ride better ?
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Old 07-06-2015, 08:59 PM
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They are also faster because of hydrodynamics. Inboards offer a lot of drag with running gear and rudders. Plus the propulsion angle isn't generally as efficient. Ride of boats is subjective.
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Old 07-06-2015, 09:14 PM
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Having twin inboard diesels is a dream of mine.
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Old 07-06-2015, 09:17 PM
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Probably avoid single-screw true inboards, as handling them has a steep learning-curve.

Also consider the draft of rudder and prop of inboards...will limit slip or dock access in a lot of waters.

Many inboards use vee-drive transmissions, and I'm not certain of their longevity or maintenance...may not be a problem.

If you're in a cold climate, and operate most of the year, freeze-protection with inboards is far more complicated than outboards, though single-screw inboards are commonplace in down-east lobster boats, some of which run in the winter even in harsh climates.

A twin-screw inboard is far easier to maneuver than a single-screw, unless the single-screw has bow thrusters, a common configuration with recreational trawlers, for example.

I'm an outboard fan, but have never owned anything over 25' long.
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Old 07-06-2015, 09:29 PM
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Default outboards vs inboards

Personally after running a single screw inboard for many years I find an outboard harder to control. I think getting used to your boat and how it handles is the big thing. If you are going to run an inboard in winter/ice conditions then a keel cooler is the way to go.
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Old 07-06-2015, 09:38 PM
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I like inboards.
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Old 07-06-2015, 09:43 PM
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Can't beat the heater of an inboard. On the other side if you wrap something around a prop you can trim an outboard out of the water.
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Old 07-06-2015, 09:45 PM
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Got to add my 2 cents in on this one. I've owned both and have put many hours on both inboards and outboard. never had the misforune of an I/O though.
Originally Posted by iFishMD View Post
Outwards are faster per horse power, more fuel-efficient, and safer. Longevity wise you don't have an automotive iron block waiting to corrode in your bilge either. This day in age outboards rule the roost.

Oh yeah. Here is one reason http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/lo...311654021.html
To cap on a few things, if its raw water cooled run away, but a fresh water cooled block with keel cooler is going to last you a couple thousand hours if not more without corrosion issues unless your spraying her down with salt on a regular basis. wet exhaust? no big deal, replace a riser every so often.but your block ain't corroding any faster than your Fiat parked at bed bath and beyond.
My last outboard blew a head gasket at under 700 hours and needed a powerhead at 1200.
i think, properly maintained an inboard will last longer.

also a fuel spill fire can happen on any boat, inboard or outboard so i feel that news link is a bad example.
Somewhere there was a guy on here that recently had an explosion because his outboard hull had no blowers installed. the thread escapes me but i remember reading it.
As far as speed and efficiency,lets take a 25' with twin 150s, vs a single inboard with 300hp
outboards have got to be burning 15 GPH each at rated RPM.
I'll cruise all day burning 7-8GPH and thats being conservative with my numbers. so i wouldn't say they are more efficient. you lose a little top speed with an inboard but i will take that nice centered weight and low gravity ride anyday, my ankles thank me.

But it all depends what kind of boating you do really, if your fishing shallows or beaching it all the time just go with an outboard. long hauls and deep water i say go inboard. and twins? you be able to dock that thing anywhere.
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Old 07-06-2015, 09:50 PM
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Single screw inboard diesel here. Once you learn how to handle it, it's a piece of cake.

Outboards do get better speed, but once in the snot the better weight distribution on the diesel makes for more comfortable slogging. Four footers packed close and there are folks sleeping in the front berth.

Don't get twin engines or for that matter diesels in too small of a boat. All that weight and hardware packed in a small engine room makes care impossible. My single is a narrow 38' and I would not want to put that hardware in anything much smaller.

Fishing much better on an inboard. Prop is down there somewhere, clean cockpit.
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