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The new compmillennia 39 cat

Old 05-05-2015, 05:56 PM
  #141  
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We started serving up the cockpit sole this week.

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Wrong picture, but its what I think about every time I look at the core kit for Ray's cockpit floor.
The core in the sandwich laminate originates from three manufacturers, three countries of origin, and in three densities and two thickness's
A mixture of carbon fiber and E-glass in 0, 90, +45, -45 and Z axis fabric infused laminate sandwich the cores in various plys.

Room to fish or line dance with 20 of your closest friends.
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Old 05-08-2015, 04:02 AM
  #142  
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We developed the ability to handle 100" wide fiber reinforcements some years ago.. 100" is the width of the material as it comes from the loom. If you buy the standard 50" material, that is 100" split in half. Its a bit of a grunt to handle a 450 lb roll of 100" material, and a pallet weighs close to 5000 lbs, but the reduction in weight (fabric and resin), from less overlaps is 3% when you laminate the part. In addition our material specification includes dropping one uni ply parallel in the area of the overlap which would be doubled needlessly and gain a saving in reducing the lap bump and save weight too. Mind the pence and the pounds take care of themselves.
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Last edited by Otseg; 05-08-2015 at 04:46 AM.
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Old 05-08-2015, 10:18 AM
  #143  
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Calculated down to 3% difference in weight for an overlap... wow.
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Old 05-12-2015, 09:54 AM
  #144  
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Not often can a boat builder laminate in his socks, but I have seen boat builders laminate and grind fiberglass in bare feet in the Bahamas'. We place all of the dry fiberglass and carbon fiber in its proper orientation "dry" Without having sticky curing resin to deal with, its much easier to get the overlaps and placement optimum. Core and local reinforcements are placed and the the balance of the fabric reinforcement before vacuum bagging.
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Old 05-12-2015, 10:55 AM
  #145  
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Hi Jim-

Really amazing work and details you and your team employ. Thank you for the information. Since you have your ply material(s) then core, and more ply matrerial (sandwich) I was wondering how difficult is it to get the ply material on both sides wetted out? It seems like with the vacuum pulling everything tight it would be difficult to get flow on the bottomside, or do you have feed tubes on both sides (and for larger pieces I assume in midpoints as well).

Thanks, Jamie
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Old 05-12-2015, 02:23 PM
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^^^^^what he said... Do you use a mesh flow media?
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Old 05-12-2015, 03:11 PM
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I'm a dentist and certainly no expert in boat building, but I do take great interest in the process. I have to say your techniques are unique and interesting. That's the first time I've seen a boat built with the floor/deck first. And the fact there there's no molds is interesting as well. Is it done that way out of necessity so you can utilize your infusion process? Is that the floor of your shop you're glassing on or a heated element of some sort for prepreg?
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Old 05-12-2015, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by MakoMyDay View Post
I'm a dentist and certainly no expert in boat building, but I do take great interest in the process. I have to say your techniques are unique and interesting. That's the first time I've seen a boat built with the floor/deck first. And the fact there there's no molds is interesting as well. Is it done that way out of necessity so you can utilize your infusion process? Is that the floor of your shop you're glassing on or a heated element of some sort for prepreg?
Go back a couple of pages,the table is gone over in great detail.
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Old 05-13-2015, 04:26 AM
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Originally Posted by SandlapperGT View Post
Hi Jim-

Really amazing work and details you and your team employ. Thank you for the information. Since you have your ply material(s) then core, and more ply matrerial (sandwich) I was wondering how difficult is it to get the ply material on both sides wetted out? It seems like with the vacuum pulling everything tight it would be difficult to get flow on the bottomside, or do you have feed tubes on both sides (and for larger pieces I assume in midpoints as well).

Thanks, Jamie
The laminate stack in this part, on this mold, must be infused from the top down using a flow media on top to distribute the resin. Just because the mold is flat doesn't mean that the parts that are made from it are so. We have various resin systems in vinylester and epoxy and different viscosities depending upon what we are making.

100% of the parts to build this 67' sportfisherman 30 years ago came from a similar vacuum mold, although the heat came from Florida.
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Old 05-13-2015, 05:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Otseg View Post
The laminate stack in this part, on this mold, must be infused from the top down using a flow media on top to distribute the resin. Just because the mold is flat doesn't mean that the parts that are made from it are so. We have various resin systems in vinylester and epoxy and different viscosities depending upon what we are making.

100% of the parts to build this 67' sportfisherman 30 years ago came from a similar vacuum mold, although the heat came from Florida.
What brand sportfisher is that? It's got some beautiful lines.
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Old 05-13-2015, 06:50 AM
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Thank you Jim- Still hard to believe that the resin will flow to the material underneath the core even with a flow media. Vacuum is a powerful thing!

Love the sporty....
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Old 05-13-2015, 11:07 AM
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Infusion is remarkable technology, There is a guy named Cal Connell that I met when I worked for Harry Schoell, who was also the designer of the Sport fisherman pictured. We made the plugs for a step boat for Cal Connell that became the 30' Rybo Runner. For 35 years, Cal Connell was a friend. He died a couple years ago, and living out of touch in N.C., I didn't know. It doesn't mean Cal is forgotten. He would qualify as a member of the Greatest Generation. Machinist, WW II Marine Air Navigator, Engine Builder, Racer of cars at Indy, Racer of Hydroplanes and boats, Pilot, Boat Builder, Inventor.

Cal built the first fiberglass water ski as an answer breaking the wood ones when ski jumping, and was always talking about putting fibeglass material in a boat mold dry and pulling the resin in after. It seemed very bizarre to me. What I did not know at first was that Troy Wollard, who also worked for Harry, was credited with building the first fiberglass boat in Florida. The 18' inboard became the Challenger, and in production it was made in matched molds with the fabric laid up dry and the resin sucked in after. That was called the Marco Method. Bill Seemann's claim to fame was the process we use today with the flow media and is called the Scrimp process.

I wish Cal and Troy could see what we do now, and how we strive to make composite boats that are almost as light as what they would be if made from cold molded wood/epoxy!
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Old 05-13-2015, 06:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Otseg View Post
100% of the parts to build this 67' sportfisherman 30 years ago came from a similar vacuum mold, although the heat came from Florida.
I witnessed this boat (or sister ship if one exists) get their outriggers caught under the Haulover inlet bridge with a strong outgoing tide about 20 plus years ago. Happened faster than the capt./operator anticipated.
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Old 05-13-2015, 07:05 PM
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Raysmith, first off Ive been following the build since the first post and wanted to say congrats on a beautiful boat!

Jim, I see your location next to your name is Miami/Washington and was curious if the boat was being built in Miami or here in NC? Fantastic work, by the way. I've always heard great things about your boats and work, and based off of this boat alone, it is very evident, the quality, time, effort, craftsmanship, thought, knowledge, etc. that you put into your work.

Congratulations and great work to both of you. I look forward to continue following the build!
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Old 05-14-2015, 05:36 AM
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Originally Posted by wsh023 View Post
The ride of my 22 is unbelievable. It rides much higher in the water and packs more air than a lot of the heavier cats I have ridden which sometimes have a quirky motion as they ride through the water rather than on top of it. Much harder to bottom out the tunnel coming off a quartering or following sea. Although light, the construction of these boats is super stiff so they lack that flex or shudder that comes on landing. Nothing like the looks on my guests, who own much larger top name monohulls, faces as they instinctively hold on and brace themselves for impact which never comes. I can't imagine what another 17 feet would feel like, but hope to see one day.
I've looked at your boat a few times in the dry stack as I walked by...
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Old 05-14-2015, 07:34 AM
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time_to_relax....

they put me in a primo spot right by the door, makes it easy to work on
i believe i've passed your glacier bay a few times at the dock or on the creek, nice boat
if you have interest in these boats, i'd be happy to take you for a ride

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Old 05-14-2015, 08:22 AM
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Originally Posted by wsh023 View Post
time_to_relax....

they put me in a primo spot right by the door, makes it easy to work on
i believe i've passed your glacier bay a few times at the dock or on the creek, nice boat
if you have interest in these boats, i'd be happy to take you for a ride
I appreciate the offer and I am actually planning on an upgrade in the next year or two. I've thoroughly enjoyed my boat and it has met expectations. As everyone knows, she's slow and ugly (my handle is "The Ugly Duckling"). My hope is that my next boat will be the "White Swan" (just kidding).

Great build thread to the OP and I'm excited about watching how it all comes together.
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:20 PM
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Black is not a good color for the tropics, I think we will spray this white next week.
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Old 05-14-2015, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Reel Costa View Post
Raysmith, first off Ive been following the build since the first post and wanted to say congrats on a beautiful boat!

Jim, I see your location next to your name is Miami/Washington and was curious if the boat was being built in Miami or here in NC? Fantastic work, by the way. I've always heard great things about your boats and work, and based off of this boat alone, it is very evident, the quality, time, effort, craftsmanship, thought, knowledge, etc. that you put into your work.

Congratulations and great work to both of you. I look forward to continue following the build!
Thank you REEL COSTA
We are very excited about this new Compmillennia 39'
Working with Jim on this build has been a pleasure
Mentored by the best,Jim is truly in a league of few.
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Old 05-15-2015, 04:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Otseg View Post
Black is not a good color for the tropics, I think we will spray this white next week.
I better explain that this is a shot of the hull mold in the area of the tunnel. A black mold has a number of benifits, and we are building a Matterhorn white boat.


We decided early that we would design the hull so that we would not in any way suffer from "Tunnel Envy" This can only be achieved if you hit your displacement targets.

Less weight, less hull beam required to achieve the buoyancy required, more tunnel width and clearance. Whatever floats your boat as the saying goes.
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