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seacat sl3 worth restoring?

Old 07-22-2014, 12:08 PM
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Default seacat sl3 worth restoring?

First of all I'm looking to upgrade from a carolina skiff 198dlv to a 22'+ catameran. I'm looking to spend under 45k. I found a seacat sl3 that I'm being told needs transom work and has soft spots in the floor. I'm seeing seacat prices all over place from 15k-30k . Would it be a bad idea to restore the sl3 and repower with some new 4 stroke 150s vs finding a newer model 22 seacat? I know no boat is technically a good financial investment I'm just looking for a comparison on a restored sl3 vs a newer seacat 220
Old 07-22-2014, 12:44 PM
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There were not that many newer SeaCat 220s built, so the used market is kind of thin for them, but you can find them. IMO, the SL3 was the best hull SeaCat ever built and went on to become the hull mold and platform for the World Cat 24.

I don't know what is involved in removing the liner on the SL3, but the actual repair of the transom and floor are pretty simple and not too costly (once you get to the soft spots in the floor). I do know that you will have to derig the t top, remove it and the liner to get to the soft spots in the floor and that may cost as much or more than the actual repair itself. As for the restoring of the hull, it would be a great project and a boat that will last as long as you want to keep it. If you plan on keeping the hull 8-10 yrs or longer, then I would not hesitate to go that route. If you are the type that will want to change boats in 2-3 yrs, you will be digging yourself a financial hole that will be tough to recover from.
Old 07-22-2014, 06:05 PM
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However, if your patient and look around, probably this fall, you will find a number of SL3 & SL5's for sale. I see one or two every three months or so which usually have a re-power that may only be 5 to 8 years old and free of soft spots/transom repair. Then again, if you get one cheap enough, it could be worthwhile approach. Yes the prices vary greatly. Makes me wonder if some owners are inhaling !?!
Old 07-22-2014, 06:21 PM
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Most of the SL3's I have seen for sale have been in the upper 20's and as pointed out above, either haven't been repowered or they were repowered in 2005 or before. For that money, if you could find an SL3, with no power or discounted heavily where you could get it under $10,000 with soft floors and transom issues, I would seriously consider rebuilding it. I think the prices have held higher on the SL3's because they were only produced for 1 year and they are very limited on the used market. Generally, I see 10-15 SL5's for sale, and often times for less money, than the occasional SL3 that comes along.

If you got an SL3 for under $10,000, you could do the floors, transom, rewired with new electronics and motors of your choice and have one hell of a boat built/outfitted exactly the way you wanted for under $40k. I would only go that route for a boat you plan on holding onto for the long haul. Personally though, if the SL3 has that massive console in it that most of them have, I would replace it since I would have to pull it and rewire it anyways. Not really sure why they went with a console that was twice the size of the SL1's console in the first place, it eats up alot of real estate.
Old 07-22-2014, 06:55 PM
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If your really asking this I'm going to say no. Reason being...... You obviously don't know how much work goes into something like a restore...Because if you did you more then likely wouldn't be asking. I'm not cutting you down but I'm saying...it's not rocket science....but its A LOT of hard manual labor and often(more so then not) people get in way over their heads and realize after they have put TONS of hrs and $ into a project to realize that their in over their heads or may not have the means to wrap it up. So that leaves you to pay someone to do it....... and that is more then likely a no go too. Paying someone to do restore's can get PRICY QUICK. Like have 3x into the boat more then its worth.



You may not agree with what I say....but I'm just throwing out there.
Old 07-22-2014, 07:04 PM
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Originally Posted by lpguy View Post
First of all I'm looking to upgrade from a carolina skiff 198dlv to a 22'+ catameran. I'm looking to spend under 45k. I found a seacat sl3 that I'm being told needs transom work and has soft spots in the floor. I'm seeing seacat prices all over place from 15k-30k . Would it be a bad idea to restore the sl3 and repower with some new 4 stroke 150s vs finding a newer model 22 seacat? I know no boat is technically a good financial investment I'm just looking for a comparison on a restored sl3 vs a newer seacat 220
If that's the one I'm thinking of I think the stringers had some problems too. I bought a SL3 new in 1997 and in my opinion the best 23' boat ever built period. Anyone that says otherwise I probably blew past that manufactures monohull running offshore.
Old 07-22-2014, 08:13 PM
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Seacat built the SL3 in 1996 and 1997.The only way to fix one in bad shape is to pull the liner out from the hull,going to take many hundreds of hours to do the job if you know what you are doing.
The World Cat 1998 246 and 230 was the same hull with higher freeboard but the boat was wood free,same ride but better efficency
Old 07-23-2014, 06:43 PM
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I am planning on keeping this boat as long as it still floats. I financially I'll be upside down in the boat once is all said and done. Was mostly looking to see if this boat spending under 40k and having everything basically brand new is worth it for the hull as apposed to possibly spending that much on a newer used cat that may end up still needing some kind of work whether it be structural or mechanical.
Old 07-30-2014, 02:06 PM
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I have one for sale if you're interested here on the hull truth. Boat is solid as a rock and in great shape considering the engines have rotted out.

Asking $10,000

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