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What makes a Boston Whaler so great??

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What makes a Boston Whaler so great??

Old 10-14-2013, 08:10 PM
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IBM
SChwinn
corvette
singer
electrolux
john deere
Cesna

just a few companies that are icons of America

Boston Whaler

Many companies were sold or out of business. Boston Whaler is still Boston Whaler and the boating public is better for it. They raised the bar and made other reach for it.
Old 10-14-2013, 08:16 PM
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I appreciate all the responses. I still have yet to hear any specifics about the boat itself that make the Boston Whaler a stand-out performer or value for the money.
Old 10-14-2013, 08:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Schmaltz~Herring View Post
My Bayliner is better than a stinkin' katamaroon!
Ignorance is bliss.
Old 10-14-2013, 08:44 PM
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I have no idea how much Whaler dealers are willing to negotiate but some of the biggest sticker shock I have ever had was when I built a 19' Outrage on their website and with a couple basic options was over $60k.

I will say that I know A LOT of people who feel Whaler and Grady are the best boats on the market and when you further discuss other boats you like and you mention Yellowfin or even Regulator or Contender they've never heard of those brands. So I think brand recognition has more to do with it than anything.
Old 10-14-2013, 10:02 PM
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I've owned 6 Whalers over the years. They look great, durable, and supposedly unsinkable (never had to find out). All have been from the classic era. I would gladly purchase another.
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Old 10-14-2013, 10:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Rfc100 View Post
I appreciate all the responses. I still have yet to hear any specifics about the boat itself that make the Boston Whaler a stand-out performer or value for the money.
Define value. I've got hundreds of pictures of my kids growing up running a 13' Whaler. There isn't another boat i would have tried that with on our the lake I let tem cut their teeth on.. (Lake Erie)
Old 10-14-2013, 11:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Rfc100 View Post
I appreciate all the responses. I still have yet to hear any specifics about the boat itself that make the Boston Whaler a stand-out performer or value for the money.
It's because they are not so great, they just have a highly regarded name. If you can find an older one cheap, you can always get your money back.

I had a 1967 13' and it crushed by back from the pounding, sold it and made a profit. I know, all 13 ft boats will pound. I have a 16, had weeds growing out of it. It's simple and functional, but nothing spectacular. I got it cheap, put in a thousand or two and I can always sell it and at minimum, get my money back.

Look at Toyota Tacoma pick ups or jeep wranglers, similar situations as far as vehicles go at least. I agree Id never get a newer BW since it will depreciate. Get and older one and its easy to get out of if you should choose to.

When I buy a boat, I get a brand name that will re-sell, even if a "lesser brand" is a better deal. I can always get out of my boats.
Old 10-15-2013, 12:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Rfc100 View Post
Can anyone tell me why Boston Whalers are so popular and expensive? I fail to find the value in them. I've heard boaters claim they are superiorly stable, but compared to a semi-displacement or full displacement power cat in rough water, they likely won't do as well. To my surprise, they cost more than power cats too.
They been building boats forever and not one has sank. Not bad eh?
Old 10-15-2013, 02:23 AM
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i can only tell u about those boats from personal experience,,1 time heading to bimini during the winter,during a rough morning with 15/20mph winds and wave 7 to 8 feet easy,a 1980's 20ft whaler cc with 2 jonhson 70hp,2stroke out boards,navigated next to us all the way to bimini without any issues,the boat/2men were well preparied for the crossing.after that day,im give whalers 2 thumbs up.
Old 10-15-2013, 05:44 AM
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To me boating is about maximising my water time and minimising my time in fixing things especially things that should not need fixing.

To me a whaler is something you go use time and again, it is a boat that you don't have to tinker with to keep going, you don't have to re-wire cause the manufacturer cut corners, the cleats won't pull out on you, you don't lose sleep whether your bilge pump works or not.

I see a lot of thought in their construction, I see a lot of proper engineering, I have a hand hold everywhere I need one, if theres a need for it they've already considered it and built it in etc.

Go have a look at some of their parts diagrams on the whaler website to understand how they build a boat. My 240 outrage has a parts diagram that runs to 79 pages of diagrams and parts listings, even a boat as simple as the 120 impact has a parts listing about 10 pages long.

I tested my last whaler severely, a '96 19' outrage and it handled 6 years of commercial abuse with bloody minimal maintenance. That boat is still in the family and still in use.

There are plenty of good boats out there but not for me, I just want to get on and go.

Re storage space, a 13' whaler is akin to what we call a tinny (possibly a Jon boat in your parlay) and they don't have any storage either - what 13' open boat does?? Horses for courses...

Dunno bout the complaints about ride, i know my 24' whaler handles rough weather well enough for its size, does it dry enough to consider going in the first place and will get me back come what may.

As I write this I am trying to buy another whaler, one of those 'appalling' 13' versions cause I've been out a long way offshore in one in bad weather and it was fun.

The worst part about owning a whaler is what the,heck do you buy next that will match your expectations. Ain't nothing here that floats my boat as an alternative.

Go,try one, you will either get it or you won't.
Old 10-15-2013, 05:54 AM
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Also, the 13' is a very stable platform for the size boat. The cathedral hull make the boat able to deal with slight miss-balanced load and deal with small chop (it still a 13' boat so only a small chop).
Old 10-15-2013, 05:56 AM
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It's only people that can't afford one who complain about them and ask stupid questions as to "why?"

Damn...I am turning into the a$$holes who haunt this sight.
Old 10-15-2013, 05:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Dookieshoot View Post
Because they are from title town!!!
Yeah, Edgewater, Florida !!
Old 10-15-2013, 06:16 AM
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Originally Posted by finz2right View Post
It's only people that can't afford one who complain about them and ask stupid questions as to "why?"

Damn...I am turning into the a$$holes who haunt this sight.
I said the same thing to someone about a month ago. They were in the market for a boat and I bragged on my Whaler. I won't say what brand they ended up with, but they said to me "I don't understand why someone would buy a Whaler when you can buy a Brand X for 2/3's the money...".

BTW, I've had 6 Whaler's since 1982, yes, I'm a bigot.
Old 10-15-2013, 06:39 AM
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If things got hairy on a boat, the foam flotation gives me more comfort then a bilge pump. Like others have mentioned in the thread, while you pay up for a Whaler they do use quality components throughout the construction of the boat.

I guess the negatives in my mind is that you are paying a premium price for a chopped vessel. When Brunswick (sp) bought them they began to cut corners and I don't think that today's boat is built as well as the older Whalers.

I guess at this point if you want the old Whaler quality in a new boat, you need to probably look at an Everglades.
Old 10-15-2013, 06:50 AM
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One of my boats is an 83 BW 13 Montauk. It still has the original teak. I use it as a creek boat, it's been very durable. It has had shrimp, lots of fish, ducks, and a few gators in between the rails over the years. It has a shallow draft, still looks like the day I got it. The 13' and 17' were the top boats used by low country game wardens in SC from the late 60's until mid 90's.

And it hasn't sunk, even when I left it at the dock one time and went of town while it filled up with rain water. I learned on this boat when I was 9 and still have it today.

I have not been a fan of them since Sea Ray took over. I am "outraged" by how bad an "outrage" rides......
Old 10-15-2013, 06:51 AM
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Originally Posted by harbor View Post
Resale. Quality always sells




It Called Marketing campaign, in which grady and whaler invested heavily in
Old 10-15-2013, 06:53 AM
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Originally Posted by finz2right View Post
It's only people that can't afford one who complain about them and ask stupid questions as to "why?"

Damn...I am turning into the a$$holes who haunt this sight.
I can afford one yet dont have one.
They are the Billy Ray Cyrus of boats.
Old 10-15-2013, 07:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Rfc100 View Post
I appreciate all the responses. I still have yet to hear any specifics about the boat itself that make the Boston Whaler a stand-out performer or value for the money.
I had two pre-90's. I guess that was back when they had "pedigree"? Since that time not so much. I sold both for MORE than I had in them and within days. The Montauk I had is the only boat I have ever regretted selling. It's become rare to find a boat that is NOT overpriced. Should a 30 foot center console cost more than a average HOUSE?

BTW...I've never been on a Whaler that rode great above 2 feet.
Old 10-15-2013, 07:06 AM
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I've had three whalers over the last 20 years or so. I started with a 17 Montauk, and now have both an 18' Dauntless and a 15 footer. They are incredibly well designed hulls. They're predictable, stable, dry, and can be operated safely in lots of different conditions. They're reasonably good in a head sea, and amazing in a following sea. They are heavy for their size, which also provides some benefits in terms of how they handle. They are unsinkable, which I, personally, like. They are "yacht quality" in terms of the fit and finish, wiring, and hardware. They're also very durable. My 15 footer is 30 years old, and has been vigorously beaten over the years. It's still a great boat, and could be restored to pristine condition if someone wanted to do that. I've owned my 18' dauntless for about 12 years (it's a 1998), have repowered it, and am probably going to keep it many more years. If I ever decide to sell one of my whalers, I know that it will be very easy to sell, and that I'll get a decent price for it. I also happen to think they're good looking boats, but that's a matter of opinion. Most of the people who criticize whalers have never owned one ("I had a buddy who had one and it would beat your teeth out," etc.) Having said all that, I've never bought one new (too pricey). I'm glad that there are people who do buy them new, as that keeps a healthy used market for those who prefer to allow others to take the initial hit on depreciation. There aren't many boat builders that have many, many 40 and 50 year old hulls still around and being used. That, alone, says a lot.

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