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1962 28ft M.E.M.C.O. Sportfisher Restoration

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1962 28ft M.E.M.C.O. Sportfisher Restoration

Old 03-01-2018, 03:43 PM
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Originally Posted by NedLloyd View Post
Corndog,......... as a point of note, I think these are "Seamaster" engines, and not Lehman's.

Also, aren't they the valve guides that benefit from the lead in the gas (lubricant) and not so much the seats?

I run a zinc replacement in my lube oil, and lead replacement in the gas for my engines.
The motors are Seamasters.
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Old 03-02-2018, 06:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Corndog38 View Post

All bolts on that engine are re-usable if not corroded and in good shape.

.
I would not reuse head bolts from an old engine, ever...a good set of head bolts is only $50 an engine...not worth the risk of using yielded bolts and blowing a head gasket later. The rod and crank bolts are OK to reuse if they are checked for stretch and pass muster.
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Old 03-02-2018, 07:51 AM
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If replacing the head bolts, make dang sure of vendor source. There are some cheap bolts in the market made from sub-par steel and poor heat treatment. That was part of the basis for my statement.
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Old 03-02-2018, 08:02 AM
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Fel-Pro (Federal Mogul) or OEM for standard replacement should be in the $50 range...ARP for high performance..maybe $20-30 more per set....
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Old 03-02-2018, 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Corndog38 View Post
Also, when the head is off, post pics of a piston or two at top dead center. There are a lot of variations of pistons available and some are dished for low compression for smog engines. You don't want those. Some also do not come up flush with block deck to achieve the same low compression.

There is a good chance the cylinder bores and pistons are in great shape, so pistons and bores can be re-used with a light hone and new rings. I would not bore it unless it needs it.

Get the casting date on the heads. Before about 1973 there were no valve seats in the exhaust ports and they were lubed by lead in the gas. With no lead in gas (now), they will wear. Seats can be installed if that is the case. Would rather do that than go to a possibly lower compression head. D3xxx is 1973. C8xxx is 1968.

Be extremely jealous of protecting the cams, manifolds, oil pans, bellhousings, etc as those are unique to the marinizing job Lehman did. Many of those parts will be dang near impossible to replace if lost or damaged.

All bolts on that engine are re-usable if not corroded and in good shape.

Measure bore and stroke and verify it is a 300 cid and not 240. They both look the same from the outside.

Engine sure looks clean up top. That's a good sign.
Corndog, here are the pictures of the pistons that you wanted to see. You also asked for pictures of the casting date. The picture that I did take I'm not sure if this is the casting information but that's the only numbers/letters I saw stamped on the block. I believe the letters/numbers on the block say C9AE-805-B
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Old 03-02-2018, 04:55 PM
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Default Inside the Motor

I'm glad the port/starboard motor is fresh water cool and no raw water goes inside the motor. When I took the fresh water pump off I looked inside the motor and was amazed that there was no rust or corrosion inside the motor. Name:  20180302_125506_HDR.jpg
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Old 03-02-2018, 05:13 PM
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Originally Posted by maxie View Post
I would not reuse head bolts from an old engine, ever...a good set of head bolts is only $50 an engine...not worth the risk of using yielded bolts and blowing a head gasket later. The rod and crank bolts are OK to reuse if they are checked for stretch and pass muster.
Couldn’t agree more, especially if the engine’s been rebuilt before. When I was building an engine in school years ago, I attempted to reuse the head bolts. When I was torquing them down I snapped one about half way through and I had to replace them anyway. I wish I would’ve replaced the rod bolts too since I wound up snapping one and completely destroyed the engine.
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Old 03-02-2018, 05:28 PM
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Default She's Skinny

The motors look skinny when nothing is on them. Today I finished stripping all the outside accessories from around the motors. When I was done I really wanted to continue to break down the motors even more then what the Marine Mechanic told me to do so. I really enjoy learning new things and working with my hands. Breaking down a motor is something I never did before, so before I venture off into the unknown and break something I decided to reach out and talk to the Marine Mechanic. Basically I asked for permission to remove the head. Most people would be to prideful to call and ask," is it ok if I remove the head.", but pride can cost you a lot of money sometimes. After he told me what to do I went for it. I'm really thankful that I was introduced to this guy (The Marine Mechanic). Most mechanics that you hire will come, do a great job, and then leave. But this guy is allowing me to work right next to him so he can teach me the internal/external functions of my motors. He will get paid a lot quicker if he came over and did the job but since he is teaching me, things are taking a lot loner and I definitely appreciate him for that. I don't just want to no this boat but I really want to NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO every part inside and out of this boat. I've known people who can tell what's wrong with something just buy listening and I will like to have that same skill level with this boat. One day the Ol Gal will make it to the Bahamas again and if something was to break I would like to have the knowledge to take care of it and hopefully I'll have the part also.

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Last edited by 28memco; 03-02-2018 at 05:35 PM.
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Old 03-02-2018, 11:35 PM
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NEVER EVER EVER REUSE HEAD BOLTS!!! The ARP catalog is your friend. I only use ARP fasteners on every motor I've ever built. There is some updating that I would do if I was you, i.e hydraulic roller cam, lifters and roller rocker arms. Keeping the I-6 is cool. Updating the valve train and keeping the unobtanium original parts in a box on the shelf is also cool.
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Old 03-03-2018, 07:08 AM
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C9 means 1969 blocks. Looking good so far!
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Old 03-03-2018, 07:21 AM
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Some other things to keep in mind

Since they will be doing a valve job, they will recut seats, recut valves and square up valve ends.i would look for new rockers and nuts so they can wear in together

They will put new cam bearings in also
So i would honestly do new cam, lifters and pushrods also replace valve spring and keepers.

Make them check installed ht for springs and shim where required.

And new timing set. Dont reuse these parts, it isny worth saving $1500 on both engines

They will be new engines and last forever...my .02
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Old 03-03-2018, 07:53 AM
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They look real good. Nice work.
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Old 03-03-2018, 10:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Corndog38 View Post
C9 means 1969 blocks. Looking good so far!
I always wondered how old the motors are. Thanks for the information. I think its pretty cool that these motors are 49 years old and once rebuilt they will still be in service. What's even more cooler than that is after 49 years the inside of the motors has no rust or corrosion. I thank God for fresh water cool motors.
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Old 03-03-2018, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by bansil View Post
Some other things to keep in mind

Since they will be doing a valve job, they will recut seats, recut valves and square up valve ends.i would look for new rockers and nuts so they can wear in together

They will put new cam bearings in also
So i would honestly do new cam, lifters and pushrods also replace valve spring and keepers.

Make them check installed ht for springs and shim where required.

And new timing set. Dont reuse these parts, it isny worth saving $1500 on both engines

They will be new engines and last forever...my .02
Thanks for the tips/help bansil. I saw you just joined The Hull Truth---WELCOME ABOARD. I hope you are enjoying the thread of the Ol Gal.
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Old 03-03-2018, 11:48 AM
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One engine is reverse rotation- It either has a custom camshaft or some sort of unusual gear drive. Don't lose the cam!!

Keep tappets identified as to which cam lobe it was on, they break in together. Label them with a sharpie 1I, 1E, 2I, 2E, etc., for intake and exhaust.

Good to keep pushrods and rockers in place, but not as critical as cams and lifters.
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Old 03-03-2018, 04:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Corndog38 View Post
One engine is reverse rotation- It either has a custom camshaft or some sort of unusual gear drive. Don't lose the cam!!
Comp Cams for sure does reverse rotation valvetrains. I'm pretty sure they're not alone. I'd contact Comp Cams for help with bringing the valvetrain into the 21st century.
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Old 03-03-2018, 04:47 PM
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I guess I’m wondering what is wrong with the valve train? It worked fine for 49 years, isn’t another 49 years enough? They’re not going to exactly stressed.
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Last edited by NedLloyd; 03-04-2018 at 05:55 AM.
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Old 03-03-2018, 05:13 PM
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Originally Posted by NedLloyd View Post
I guess I’m wondering what is weong with the valve train? It worked fine for 49 years, isn’t another 49 years enough? They’re not going to exactly stressed.
Marine motors are always stressed due to the constant throttle demands. A roller valvetrain is probably good for a 20% increase in efficiency. The cost difference between going new hydraulic roller and refreshing the original valvetrain is probably much than you'd think.
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Old 03-04-2018, 06:04 AM
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Originally Posted by NOLA Rick View Post
Marine motors are always stressed due to the constant throttle demands. A roller valvetrain is probably good for a 20% increase in efficiency. The cost difference between going new hydraulic roller and refreshing the original valvetrain is probably much than you'd think.
I am curious, and would like to understand, what do you mean by “always stressed due to the constant throttle demands”? Marine engines go through a lot less throttle changes than automotive/truck applications. Marine engines are more set the throttle and leave it (like an industrial engine).
Also, where does a 20% increase in engine efficiency come from? I know there is some increase from reduced friction, but I can’t see more than 20% of an engine’s power being sucked up just to turn the valve train.
I’m Interested in learning. (The engines in my boat are flat tapped mechanical valve train technology.)

Last edited by NedLloyd; 03-04-2018 at 08:48 AM.
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Old 03-04-2018, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by NedLloyd View Post
I am curious, and would like to understand, what do you mean by “always stressed due to the constant throttle demands”? Marine engines go through a lot less throttle changes than automotive/truck applications. Marine engines are more set the throttle and leave it (like an industrial engine).
Also, where does a 20% increase in engine efficiency come from? I know there is some increase from reduced friction, but I can’t see more than 20% of an engine’s power being sucked up just to turn the valve train.
I’m Interested in learning. (The engines in my boat are flat tapped mechanical valve train technology.)
He means a marine engine is always loaded. An automotive engine is loaded on acceleration but hardly loaded at highway speeds or once up to driving speed because the friction of the road and driveline isn't much. also downhill areas are pratically zero load on an engine.

In a boat the same engine is always pushing against the friction of the water, which increases with speed, it never gets a break, even coming down the side of a wave it is loaded. That is why marinized engines are always built stronger than an automotive engine.

Turning the valve train sucks up a lot of the engines power. A surprising amount. Newer technology minimizes that.
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