Go Back  The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum > BOATING FORUMS > The Boating Forum
Reload this Page >

1962 28ft M.E.M.C.O. Sportfisher Restoration

Notices
Like Tree448Likes

1962 28ft M.E.M.C.O. Sportfisher Restoration

Old 03-07-2012, 10:58 AM
  #41  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 249
Default

As to who Jim Smith was: Jim and Mabry raced outboard hydroplanes during the forties, and bacame friends, actually more like friendly rivals ,Jim raced from the 20's to the late 40's. I am thinking Mabry came on the scene later in jims racing career as Mabry was younger. Jim Smith was born in 1906 passed in 94 or so.They formed a loose partnership and shared a shed at the jacksonville airport and built a few boats together I think there was a picture or two of this boat among Jims old boat picture collection. the last boat jim built in thie jacksonville airport shed was a 52 footer, pictures of which are in a thread on this site "oldest known Jim Smith flybridge" The 35 footer with the flying saucer/electric ladder tower was also built in their jacksonville shed 58 or 59 or so, the 52 in 62-63.There is a video of this 35 in the Jim Smith thread. the 53 Boca Jima V also in a thread video was built in pompano. There is more history in the thread. Mabry was a career airforce man If I remember right He was a full Bird Colonel. Jim reached more notoriety as a boat builder The company that was his, is still in business almost 20 years after his passing Google Jim Smith Boats. I named my company Tribute Performance Boats as a Tribute to Him. Rich
Tribute 1 is offline  
Old 03-07-2012, 12:11 PM
  #42  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Some where over the rainbow
Posts: 1,624
Default

Originally Posted by Tribute 1 View Post
As to who Jim Smith was: Jim and Mabry raced outboard hydroplanes during the forties, and bacame friends, actually more like friendly rivals ,Jim raced from the 20's to the late 40's. I am thinking Mabry came on the scene later in jims racing career as Mabry was younger. Jim Smith was born in 1906 passed in 94 or so.They formed a loose partnership and shared a shed at the jacksonville airport and built a few boats together I think there was a picture or two of this boat among Jims old boat picture collection. the last boat jim built in thie jacksonville airport shed was a 52 footer, pictures of which are in a thread on this site "oldest known Jim Smith flybridge" The 35 footer with the flying saucer/electric ladder tower was also built in their jacksonville shed 58 or 59 or so, the 52 in 62-63.There is a video of this 35 in the Jim Smith thread. the 53 Boca Jima V also in a thread video was built in pompano. There is more history in the thread. Mabry was a career airforce man If I remember right He was a full Bird Colonel. Jim reached more notoriety as a boat builder The company that was his, is still in business almost 20 years after his passing Google Jim Smith Boats. I named my company Tribute Performance Boats as a Tribute to Him. Rich
Wow. I never new that and searched the Internet and couldn't find nothing. Thanks for posting this information.
28memco is offline  
Old 03-07-2012, 12:25 PM
  #43  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Tampa Bay
Posts: 4,683
Default

Wish builders would make this style of boat with modern materials...

Simply gorgeous...
Commocean is offline  
Old 03-07-2012, 12:48 PM
  #44  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: jax, florida
Posts: 1,270
Default edwards/smith

Rich,
was this one of those mabry/jim smith collaborations?
It was built in '68. Do you know when exactly they were building at the Imeson Airport shed?
tom
Attached Images  
tabascoT is offline  
Old 03-07-2012, 04:34 PM
  #45  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 249
Default

The 52 that Jim built at jacksonville, Boca Jima IV, was his last boat built there. He launched that boat and ran it down to his place in Boca.Jim had a hotel called the Bluefin on the beach just north of the boca inlet, and a house on the water inside,just across the road from the Bluefin. This boat was launched without an interior. Jim chartered it and over a year or so he finished off the interior behind his house between charters.. This boat made its first appearance at Bimini for tuna season 1964. The 53 ft. Boca Jima V was built in Pompano late 60's launched early 70's. So I dont think this boat was a collaboration of Jim and Mabry even if Mabry might have said so. I see too much Rybovich/Merritt styling in it . Jims boats were very crisp and angular. Although I am a big rybo/ Merritt admirer I can tell you for sure they would be the last boats to influence Jims styling. Rich
Tribute 1 is offline  
Old 03-08-2012, 06:40 AM
  #46  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Some where over the rainbow
Posts: 1,624
Default 1962 28 ft m.e.m.c.o. sportfisher HISTORY

"Rip Tide" was designed by her late owner C. N. Heston, a mechanical engineer and native of Jacksonville, Florida. The plans were presented to Mr. Heston's friend and well known boat builder Mabry Edwards, also of Jacksonville, to construct the hull, deck and house. Mabry Edwards Marine Company (aka Memco) began construction on November 21, 1959 at their Imerson Airport facility. M.E. Ellis, Charlie Simmons, Ronnie Lowe and M.D. Brown spent many months turning Mr. Heston's plans into reality. The boat was then moved to Mr. Heston's private shop where he spent many months in the final outfitting of the vessel. On June 18, 1962, "Rip Tide" was christened and launched at Beach Marine in Jacksonville Beach. After almost 10 years of use, the owner decided to take the boat back to the shop and replaced the original single Chrysler 318 engine with a pair of Sea Marine Six Ford engines, which are currently powering the boat. The boat was re-launched in 1972. "Rip Tide" has been kept in Jacksonville since new. She has been used to fish the coastal waters of Northeast Florida with occasional trips to the Keys and the Bahamas. The boat has been continuously maintained and received a polyurethane paint job approximately 5 years ago.
28memco is offline  
Old 03-08-2012, 06:47 AM
  #47  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Some where over the rainbow
Posts: 1,624
Default Fuel Stick

This is a 1st for me. I never had a boat where you have to dip a stick in the tank to see how much fuel you have. I was told that's the most accurate way for a boat owner to truly no how much fuel he has. I think it's cool to do it this way but I think it'll get old fast or maybe that's the lazy American in me that wants to look down at a fuel gauge. Name:  IMAG0291.jpg
Views: 8400
Size:  87.2 KB

Name:  IMAG0292.jpg
Views: 8263
Size:  93.5 KB
28memco is offline  
Old 03-08-2012, 07:00 AM
  #48  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: jax, florida
Posts: 1,270
Default rip tide

...
By Joe Julavits
Times-Union outdoors editor,


The storied "good old days" of Jacksonville offshore fishing really were good, Charlie Heston says. But the navigation back then -- finding one's way around the big pond -- left a lot to be desired.
"Sometimes you'd spend all day looking for your spot and never find it," said the 80-year-old Heston, who along with his brother Linden was among the pioneers of local offshore fishing.
In the '60's, Linden ran the Rapid Rabbit boat out of Mayport. The artificial reef Rabbit's Lair (RL) would later be named after his boat, and Linden is since deceased. Charlie piloted the Riptide, a 28-foot hull he built himself with the help of noted boat designer Mabry Edwards. The Riptide is still berthed at Heston's Pottsburg Creek dock.
Like other members of the fledgling Jacksonville Outboard Sport Fishing Club -- later to become the Jacksonville Offshore Sport Fishing Club -- the Heston brothers relied on a compass, distance/speed calculations and crossed fingers to locate fishing spots.
One day, Charlie, who had been a naval aviator during World War II, showed up with a strange-looking box on his boat. The planes Heston had flown during the war were outfitted with a navigation system called Loran -- long-range navigation. He found a Loran A unit at a war surplus store.
"In one direction, it was accurate to within about one-quarter mile; in the other direction it was within about 100 yards," Heston said. "We at least knew what ocean we were in."
Loran A was primitive by today's standards, but it was a leap for the offshore anglers of that period. Heston and his Loran helped the offshore club place markers on the early artificial reefs.
Even with Loran, few boats were capable of venturing far offshore to troll the bluewater. While trolling aboard his friend Edwards' boat, Heston caught the second blue marlin ever recorded in Northeast Florida (Edwards and George Hodges are credited with the first).

Too bad it didn't have that old loran unit on it that would be wild !!! That boat could really tell some tales. You're lucky to have it.
tabascoT is offline  
Old 03-08-2012, 07:07 AM
  #49  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 134
Default

Very Nice Simple. Look's like you'll have something to enjoy...
ITman is offline  
Old 03-08-2012, 07:14 AM
  #50  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Some where over the rainbow
Posts: 1,624
Default

Originally Posted by tabascoT View Post
...
By Joe Julavits
Times-Union outdoors editor,


The storied "good old days" of Jacksonville offshore fishing really were good, Charlie Heston says. But the navigation back then -- finding one's way around the big pond -- left a lot to be desired.
"Sometimes you'd spend all day looking for your spot and never find it," said the 80-year-old Heston, who along with his brother Linden was among the pioneers of local offshore fishing.
In the '60's, Linden ran the Rapid Rabbit boat out of Mayport. The artificial reef Rabbit's Lair (RL) would later be named after his boat, and Linden is since deceased. Charlie piloted the Riptide, a 28-foot hull he built himself with the help of noted boat designer Mabry Edwards. The Riptide is still berthed at Heston's Pottsburg Creek dock.
Like other members of the fledgling Jacksonville Outboard Sport Fishing Club -- later to become the Jacksonville Offshore Sport Fishing Club -- the Heston brothers relied on a compass, distance/speed calculations and crossed fingers to locate fishing spots.
One day, Charlie, who had been a naval aviator during World War II, showed up with a strange-looking box on his boat. The planes Heston had flown during the war were outfitted with a navigation system called Loran -- long-range navigation. He found a Loran A unit at a war surplus store.
"In one direction, it was accurate to within about one-quarter mile; in the other direction it was within about 100 yards," Heston said. "We at least knew what ocean we were in."
Loran A was primitive by today's standards, but it was a leap for the offshore anglers of that period. Heston and his Loran helped the offshore club place markers on the early artificial reefs.
Even with Loran, few boats were capable of venturing far offshore to troll the bluewater. While trolling aboard his friend Edwards' boat, Heston caught the second blue marlin ever recorded in Northeast Florida (Edwards and George Hodges are credited with the first).

Too bad it didn't have that old loran unit on it that would be wild !!! That boat could really tell some tales. You're lucky to have it.
Thank you for posting the things you know or have found about this boat. Everything you have posted I'm saving it. Thanks again
28memco is offline  
Old 03-08-2012, 07:25 AM
  #51  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: jax, florida
Posts: 1,270
Default riptide

Thats awesome. You really have a piece of Northeast Florida Sportfishing history and it sounds like its in good hands.
tom
tabascoT is offline  
Old 03-08-2012, 07:42 AM
  #52  
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Sourthern NJ.
Posts: 37
Default

Very cool boat. Brings back memories of my old wooden lap strake Chris Craft that my father and I re furbished back in the 80's. Always loved the wooden dipstick on that boat for the fuel tank don't loose it, also loved the old bamboo outriggers. Can't wait to see more pic's. Good luck with her.
Wharfrat1963 is offline  
Old 03-08-2012, 07:46 AM
  #53  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Southern Maryland
Posts: 983
Default

very classic,, man she is flat bottomed !
marolina is offline  
Old 03-08-2012, 10:44 AM
  #54  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Some where over the rainbow
Posts: 1,624
Default Going offshore Question

As you can see from the boat pictures the back of the boat is flat and there is a small V at the front of the boat. Do anyone think I'll have problems going offshore maybe even blue water fishing in this boat if sea conditions get bad?
28memco is offline  
Old 03-08-2012, 10:50 AM
  #55  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: San Diego CA
Posts: 551
Default

That is a damn good looking boat. Congrats!
Trayscool is offline  
Old 03-08-2012, 11:35 AM
  #56  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Pt. Judith, RI
Posts: 3,791
Default

That is a flat bottom bitch for sure!! Very pretty lines.
PtJudeRI is offline  
Old 03-08-2012, 11:40 AM
  #57  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Gulf Breeze, Florida
Posts: 3,594
Default

Originally Posted by tabascoT View Post
Rich,
was this one of those mabry/jim smith collaborations?
It was built in '68. Do you know when exactly they were building at the Imeson Airport shed?
tom

Tabasco,
Do I correctly recall seeing this blue boat for sale somewhere overseas and being called a MEMCO? Pretty little boat for sure.
rybovich18 is offline  
Old 03-08-2012, 11:41 AM
  #58  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Gulf Breeze, Florida
Posts: 3,594
Default

Originally Posted by Tribute 1 View Post
As to who Jim Smith was: Jim and Mabry raced outboard hydroplanes during the forties, and bacame friends, actually more like friendly rivals ,Jim raced from the 20's to the late 40's. I am thinking Mabry came on the scene later in jims racing career as Mabry was younger. Jim Smith was born in 1906 passed in 94 or so.They formed a loose partnership and shared a shed at the jacksonville airport and built a few boats together I think there was a picture or two of this boat among Jims old boat picture collection. the last boat jim built in thie jacksonville airport shed was a 52 footer, pictures of which are in a thread on this site "oldest known Jim Smith flybridge" The 35 footer with the flying saucer/electric ladder tower was also built in their jacksonville shed 58 or 59 or so, the 52 in 62-63.There is a video of this 35 in the Jim Smith thread. the 53 Boca Jima V also in a thread video was built in pompano. There is more history in the thread. Mabry was a career airforce man If I remember right He was a full Bird Colonel. Jim reached more notoriety as a boat builder The company that was his, is still in business almost 20 years after his passing Google Jim Smith Boats. I named my company Tribute Performance Boats as a Tribute to Him. Rich

Rich,
As usual, great info. Really cool to hear you named your company in honor of Jim.
rybovich18 is offline  
Old 03-08-2012, 11:57 AM
  #59  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Baltimore,Maryland
Posts: 5,469
Default

Originally Posted by 28memco View Post
This is a 1st for me. I never had a boat where you have to dip a stick in the tank to see how much fuel you have. I was told that's the most accurate way for a boat owner to truly no how much fuel he has. I think it's cool to do it this way but I think it'll get old fast or maybe that's the lazy American in me that wants to look down at a fuel gauge. Attachment 226340

Attachment 226341

Fuel Dipstick! My Dad had a 1928 Wheeler with a 120 h.p. Gray Marine...It was a Lapstrake Boat..Big Giant Hand Bildge Pump ,AND the "Fuel Dipstick"!! I remember going out and once the Boat started pushing water up the sides to the dried Lapstrakes,water would start coming in the Cabin.YIKES!!!Thought we were going to sink!!!

Dad said,Ah,Don't worry its normal! I'd grab the Handle of that[I think Brass] Bildge pump and start pumping!!! Also remember the Big mechanical shift lever..You had to actually Ram the thing into gear!
Lone Ranger is offline  
Old 03-08-2012, 03:59 PM
  #60  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Sunny florida
Posts: 23,036
Default

We had a stick for a 21' Trojan we kept in Goodbys Lake.

The lines and hull are reminiscent of Forrest Johnson Prowlers...
billinstuart is online now  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread