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Anti-Seize products for threaded fasteners???

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Anti-Seize products for threaded fasteners???

Old 09-26-2011, 04:09 PM
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Default Anti-Seize products for threaded fasteners???

There have been recent threads about seized lower-units on outboard motors, resulting in significant damage to separate the LU from the mid casting.

What is the best way of preventing a "frozen" lower unit, or, seized threads in general?

There are various "never-seize" products available, some with graphite, some with copper, some with nickel...some seem to be blamed on actually causing corrosion in a saltwater environment when dealing with dissimilar metals, like steel (or, stainless) going into alumiminum castings, rather than eliminating corrosion (particularly the copper and nickel-containing ones).

Other sources have recommended Locktite "blue" thread-locker as the best route to avoid electrolyte migration along the threads. Still others recommend Teflon-based products such as Tef-Gel (which is grossly over-priced, I think).

I'm leary of the Locktite because it provides zero lubrication when unscrewing a threaded fastener, but that's just an un-educated opinion on my part.

Someone, please solve the mystery of which is the optimum product.

There are inexpensive Teflon pastes sold to the plumbing trade, for threaded pipe fittings...wonder if they would substitute for the expensive Tef-Gel?

[Rwidman: I trust your analytical skills, so please post your take on this issue]
Old 09-26-2011, 04:18 PM
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Teflon paste.. dang that's some messy stuff but works. Tef-gel or paste allows the metal to still make contact to prevent galvanic corrosion.
Weak thread locker works too yep. Just want to seal the threads.

I use either teflon or grease on my lower unit bolts and have never had an issue. I use thread lock on engine parts and again no issues.
Old 09-26-2011, 04:21 PM
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I use the teflon based pipe thread lube to run gas lines and it dries up after a couple of years, I wouldn't trust it in a marine enviornment. I use the copper based never seize and have never had a problem with it. I guess you could use teflon tape if you don't trust the anti-seize compounds. I have one of those ford ( in my truck) engines where the spark plugs break when you try to remove them, I just replaced the plugs and used the copper anti-sieze on the threads, we'll see how it holds up in a high heat enviornment.

Last edited by bayou man; 09-26-2011 at 04:32 PM.
Old 09-26-2011, 04:27 PM
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pine tar, heat it up a bit to get it runny then use it on the threads. old school but it works.
Old 09-26-2011, 04:34 PM
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Pine tar? Just exactly how old are you? (just kidding)
Old 09-26-2011, 04:54 PM
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Never Seize on the threads, grease on the driveshaft and shift shaft splines. Never a problem.
Old 09-26-2011, 04:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Design59 View Post
Never Seize on the threads, grease on the driveshaft and shift shaft splines. Never a problem.
Ditto.
Old 09-26-2011, 05:04 PM
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I just pulled my lower unit after 400 hours and 4 years of salt used and it came right off because the mechanic who changed the impeller last time used Mercury SPecial Lubricant #101. The stuff is thick and green. You cant miss it on a bolt.


I have used this stuff and its pretty cheap.
http://www.starbrite.com/productdeta...&ProductSSCat=

Last edited by Mr. Demeanor; 09-26-2011 at 05:50 PM.
Old 09-26-2011, 06:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Design59 View Post
Never Seize on the threads, grease on the driveshaft and shift shaft splines. Never a problem.
X2. Permatex Never Seize.
Old 09-26-2011, 06:33 PM
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I can't tell you how many hours of abuse the bottom end of a few dozers I've pulled apart with nothing more than a very high quality grease applied to the threads. Old school yes but it works using simple but BIG tools.
Old 09-26-2011, 06:34 PM
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Tef Gel
Old 09-26-2011, 06:40 PM
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X2 on Tef Gel, hard to find, I bought mine from eBay, http://www.ebay.com/itm/TefGel-Tef-G...item43a97762dd
Old 09-26-2011, 08:54 PM
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Originally Posted by jayyy View Post
X2. Permatex Never Seize.
Sorry, but that's a pretty lame answer...

There are about a dozen formulations of "Permatex Never Seize", all with different properties and compositions. Some copper, some nickel, some graphite, some silver, some Teflon, some blends of the above.

http://www.neverseezproducts.com/antiseize.htm
Old 09-26-2011, 09:32 PM
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Originally Posted by bayou man View Post
Pine tar? Just exactly how old are you? (just kidding)
old enough to know it works great. It was shown to me by a dragger capt many years ago
Old 09-26-2011, 11:43 PM
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Stainless bolts into aluminum casting - another vote for Tef Gel. Yes, it is messy, expensive, and hard to find. Haven't used it on engines yet but it works well on expensive oceanographic equipment.
Old 09-27-2011, 12:52 AM
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Red face Seize protection.

Back in the day, OMC used a form of Permatex or 3M Form a gasket. Their version was thinner and non hardening. It was definitely water proof.

This stuff kept the water out of the threads and prevented electrolysis. Bolts came out cleanly after years under water.

This stuff was used only on the below the water line bolts and between the upper and lower out drive halves. Heavy grease was used on the splines.

The Permatex, thin, non hardening formagasket is available most everywhere at low costs.
Old 09-27-2011, 04:40 AM
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We use Sweeney 503 moly paste at work for high torque bolts(7000 ft/lbs), under and at the water line. Never had a problem if applied to theads and shoulders, bolts usually come free less than 8000 ft/lbs. Dry bolts would sometimes break free at 15,000 ft/lbs. If copper based never sieze was used it was time to get the torch and cut them off. 15,000 ft/lbs was the max for the hydraulic wrench used.

STL 4 by Cooper is another thread lube we use on electrical junction boxes, aluminum boxes with stainless bolts. It is formulated for dissimilar metals, not sure how well it would hold up under the water line, but works great above.
Old 09-27-2011, 05:17 AM
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Merc 2-4-C grease
Old 09-27-2011, 05:25 AM
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Outside of the marine industry... it is standard practice not to use anti-seize compounds that contain metal(s) as part of their makeup, for any application in salt water, . Various water proof lubricants with different properties/viscosity are used , that contain no metal.

I use NO-OX....and I like silicone based lubricants, the thicker the better. I also have some real old stuff (not sure what it is) but it's used for underwater marine telecommuncation/power cables.

However I did see this stuff. ...Never Seez® Mariners Choice Anti-Seize
Old 09-27-2011, 06:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Widespread Panic View Post
We use Sweeney 503 moly paste at work for high torque bolts(7000 ft/lbs), under and at the water line. Never had a problem if applied to theads and shoulders, bolts usually come free less than 8000 ft/lbs. Dry bolts would sometimes break free at 15,000 ft/lbs. If copper based never sieze was used it was time to get the torch and cut them off. 15,000 ft/lbs was the max for the hydraulic wrench used.

STL 4 by Cooper is another thread lube we use on electrical junction boxes, aluminum boxes with stainless bolts. It is formulated for dissimilar metals, not sure how well it would hold up under the water line, but works great above.
and I thought my crank pulley bolt was "high torque" at 215 ft/lbs.

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