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When did wood become a bad thing?

Old 08-09-2011, 04:23 PM
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Default When did wood become a bad thing?

I have noticed that it seems to be a big bragging point to be 100% woodfree when it comes to boats (at least on the manufacturers sites). What is this stigma about boats and wood? I have quite a few buddies with Parker's that incorporate good marine-grade plywood, and they are absolutely in love with them. Matter of fact, they say they will take their chances over a 100% woodfree boat because they insist that the non-woodies lend themselves to cracking much easier. Is this true? And when did wood become a bad word in boating?
Old 08-09-2011, 04:39 PM
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Originally Posted by seriola_killer View Post
I have noticed that it seems to be a big bragging point to be 100% woodfree when it comes to boats (at least on the manufacturers sites). What is this stigma about boats and wood? I have quite a few buddies with Parker's that incorporate good marine-grade plywood, and they are absolutely in love with them. Matter of fact, they say they will take their chances over a 100% woodfree boat because they insist that the non-woodies lend themselves to cracking much easier. Is this true? And when did wood become a bad word in boating?
Wood became a bad thing when yellowfin started building boats!
Old 08-09-2011, 04:43 PM
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Every material has a gotcha' in one way or another.
Old 08-09-2011, 04:45 PM
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My wife likes wood. . . .





Someone had to say it. . .
Old 08-09-2011, 04:49 PM
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Nothing wrong with wood. It is more expensive to build a boat with it than chopped matt shot in with a gun though.

So you take a weakness and make it your strength by tearing down someone eses strength and making it a weakness.

Time honored marketing. Time better honor it, because nobody else will.
Old 08-09-2011, 04:53 PM
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Originally Posted by seriola_killer View Post
I have noticed that it seems to be a big bragging point to be 100% woodfree when it comes to boats (at least on the manufacturers sites). What is this stigma about boats and wood? I have quite a few buddies with Parker's that incorporate good marine-grade plywood, and they are absolutely in love with them. Matter of fact, they say they will take their chances over a 100% woodfree boat because they insist that the non-woodies lend themselves to cracking much easier. Is this true? And when did wood become a bad word in boating?
Jerry,
Wood in and of itself is not a bad word.
The vast majority of manufacturers have gone wood free.
Costs alot of money to change over a plant from wood to composite, and composites, at least the correct composites, cost more money than wood.
It costs more money to build a wood free product, done right, than a product with wood.
Most. I think all, have found the investment has paid off in the long run with reduced warranty expenses directly attributed to wood.
The boating public has very much become educated in this regard and is, for a very-very large part, very anti wood.
Jerry,
That is not to say there is not very well built product that still uses wood.
Old 08-09-2011, 04:54 PM
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It became bad when manufactures used bad techniques,bad cheap labor. And a novice owner doin his own drillin
Old 08-09-2011, 04:55 PM
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It didn't.
Old 08-09-2011, 04:56 PM
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Originally Posted by StraitsFisher View Post
It didn't.
Old 08-09-2011, 05:05 PM
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Take a look at the top custom sport fishing boats. They are still made of wood. The wood boats have a better ride than fiberglass boats. While wood is not for everyone all the nicest sport fishing boats are still made of wood. You need to know how to look after a wood boat. No 5200 in screw holes!
Old 08-09-2011, 05:43 PM
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Wood and fresh water is the problem, in saltwater no problem. The old large sailing vessels had salt boxes built in between the frames so fresh rain water would be salt water when it hit the bilge. Salt is a preservative. So in Fla where it rains a lot, wood got a bad rap.
Old 08-09-2011, 05:54 PM
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I think woood became a bad boat word when....Insurance and marinas started to refuse to accept them as clients... It also became a low maintance verse high maintance issue
Old 08-09-2011, 05:55 PM
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Originally Posted by narrab View Post
Take a look at the top custom sport fishing boats. They are still made of wood. The wood boats have a better ride than fiberglass boats. While wood is not for everyone all the nicest sport fishing boats are still made of wood. You need to know how to look after a wood boat. No 5200 in screw holes!
I believe the OP was questioning wood structure in production boats, not wood boats. (at least the way I read it)

I don't see wood as inherently bad, just that we have developed superior substitutes. And in a production setting, they are superior. The warranty numbers from any builder will substantiate it. But whether to buy, or not to buy a boat with encapsulated wood is purely up to the educated consumer.

I do get a kick out of the people who cite the lifetime warranty from the producers of "marine plywood". Most have never actually read the warranty. Should it rot, they will replace the failed product, not pay for the repair. So if you need 2k in labor to replace that wood transom, they will promptly send you the two sheets of ply . . . you eat the labor bill.

We have many threads on projects to replace wood transoms, stringers, and floors. Can't say I have seen all that many to replace the same composite components, and we are what ten, fifteen years into composite boats?
Old 08-09-2011, 06:20 PM
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Sutphens are built with wood and ride better than any other boat, no contest
Old 08-09-2011, 06:36 PM
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Originally Posted by narrab View Post
You need to know how to look after a wood boat. No 5200 in screw holes!
I'm gonna bite on this one... Would someone please elaborate? Are we talking a wood plank boat or the glassed over deck of my Privateer where the console is screwed down? Why would I NOT seal screw holes? Sorry in advance for a dumb question.
Old 08-09-2011, 06:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Fechmup View Post
I'm gonna bite on this one... Would someone please elaborate? Are we talking a wood plank boat or the glassed over deck of my Privateer where the console is screwed down? Why would I NOT seal screw holes? Sorry in advance for a dumb question.
5200 is used on glass boats. Wood boats are finished so there is no need for 5200. well unless someone is a hack
Old 08-09-2011, 06:45 PM
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Glassed over wood. No moisture meter needed, you can see integrity is perfect. Wood is well proven for any type of boat building. Wood is not a bad word, wood creates a masterpiece.....

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_kWKZM7h0ds.../kayak+204.jpg
Old 08-09-2011, 06:52 PM
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Originally Posted by lobstercatcher View Post
5200 is used on glass boats. Wood boats are finished so there is no need for 5200. well unless someone is a hack
I think what narrab meant was don't use 5200 on any type of hole in a wood boat and think its waterproof....any wood boat, planked, core, glassed over, cold molded etc need to have any penetrations from mounting screws, thru hulls, hardware etc sealed with resin, preferably epoxy, to make it waterproof and seal the grain of the wood...gooping in 5200 has been the cure-all for every boat hole known to mankind, hence so many wooden hulled or cored boats getting water damage and rot over time.

i wouldn't use just 5200 on any type of boat, regardless of material...I always resin the hole first to seal it and then bed the hardware in whatever caulk is suitable, be it 5200, 4200, Life Caulk etc.
Old 08-09-2011, 07:02 PM
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[quote=maxie;3944833]I think what narrab meant was don't use 5200 on any type of hole in a wood boat and think its waterproof....any wood boat, planked, core, glassed over, cold molded etc need to have any penetrations from mounting screws, thru hulls, hardware etc sealed with resin, preferably epoxy, to make it waterproof and seal the grain of the wood...gooping in 5200 has been the cure-all for every boat hole known to mankind, hence so many wooden hulled or cored boats getting water damage and rot over time.

i wouldn't use just 5200 on any type of boat, regardless of material...I always resin the hole first to seal it and then bed the hardware in whatever caulk is suitable, be it 5200, 4200, Life Caulk etc.[/quote


You don't plug with bungs?
Old 08-09-2011, 07:06 PM
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Originally Posted by lobstercatcher View Post
I think woood became a bad boat word when....Insurance and marinas started to refuse to accept them as clients... It also became a low maintance verse high maintance issue
I have an old and deep love for wood boats.
Last one I lost my butt on was about 1973, an old Chris Ski Skiff, 283 Chevy's..
Lapstrake, great lines, named the boat after my oldest daughter.
My love for the boat, and the fun, did however outweigh my checkbook.
Lost the boat in a Mullett throwing contest at the Floribama in Orange Beach, Alabama to a V-20 WELLCRAFT.
Sold the V-20, and came out way ahead.

I think, as I understand it, the post goes' to production boats and the market as it exists, and has. I dont think the "From the heart" kinda stuff makes alot of dollar and cents kind of sense, but could be valid from an individuals viewpoint as to a personal like of wood boats.

As to todays world, the cold and sometimes hard world that some of us live, "wood" is not very often pleasing to the ears of many people. And I think, very justly so.

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