The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum

The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum (https://www.thehulltruth.com/index.php)
-   The Boating Forum (https://www.thehulltruth.com/boating-forum-14/)
-   -   Parker Boats and Use of Wood (https://www.thehulltruth.com/boating-forum/342294-parker-boats-use-wood.html)

capecuddy 04-04-2011 10:40 PM

Parker Boats and Use of Wood
 
At the risk of getting flamed, what are the thoughts about Parker boats and their use of wooden structure in their fiberglass hulls? It seems all other manufacturers brag about "NO WOOD".

I was getting ready to not worry about it, but then noticed they only have a 5 year hull warranty vs 10 year and Lifetime in many others.

All other buzz here on THT that I've seen has been very positive about Parker boats.....so why shouldn't I be concerned?:banghead:

jonesg 04-05-2011 02:14 AM

Anywhere theres wood you have to check condition beneath the deck.

seakeeper 04-05-2011 03:36 AM

Many great manufacturers still use wood. Look at the construction, in the deck plates, at the transom etc. to how they seal it and glass it in. Parker has been around forever, you dont hear to many complaints about them. Obviously I I would not hesitate to buy a boat with wood in it, my Grady has plenty.

StraitsFisher 04-05-2011 05:13 AM

It's all about method and quality control. Parker uses appropriate methods and has an excellent quality control system.

Manufacturer's that have issues with wood generally do not have effective methods or quality control.

You will read about Parker's with wood issues. Virtually every one of the issues stems from an incorrectly treated penetration performed after the boat left the plant. Poke a hole in the membrane and don't treat it correctly, you will have issues.

Wood is good.

JW

solarfry 04-05-2011 05:30 AM

Wood is good?
 

Originally Posted by capecuddy (Post 3659672)
At the risk of getting flamed, what are the thoughts about Parker boats and their use of wooden structure in their fiberglass hulls? It seems all other manufacturers brag about "NO WOOD".

I was getting ready to not worry about it, but then noticed they only have a 5 year hull warranty vs 10 year and Lifetime in many others.

All other buzz here on THT that I've seen has been very positive about Parker boats.....so why shouldn't I be concerned?:banghead:

Parker makes some fine vessels.

Keep the bilge free of any fresh water and you should have no problems. Store boat with bow at least 12 " above stern with plug out and a drip line. VEntilate the bilge.

Wood does not rot in salt water, it's the rain's fresh water that rots it out. Fresh water creates reverse osmosis and pops the wood cells.

Wood is good but a woody is better :grin:

Paul Barnard 04-05-2011 05:36 AM

Don't be misled by the "no wood, no rot" sales hype. Water penetration will adversely affect any coring that is on the market today. I have seen "no rot" coring that was nothing but mush.

Yellowfin, Grady White, Parker and many other boats use wood in the construction. They all have a very good reputation. The key, as one other poster mentioned, is to properly care for the wood when you penetrate it. The same can be said any time you penetrate coring on a boat.

jawz 04-05-2011 05:48 AM


Originally Posted by StraitsFisher (Post 3659869)
It's all about method and quality control. Parker uses appropriate methods and has an excellent quality control system.

Manufacturer's that have issues with wood generally do not have effective methods or quality control.

You will read about Parker's with wood issues. Virtually every one of the issues stems from an incorrectly treated penetration performed after the boat left the plant. Poke a hole in the membrane and don't treat it correctly, you will have issues.

Wood is good.

JW


excellent points...

parker makes a good product - i've seen a few,still under warranty,with problems in the hard top-area of the hand rails,and the holes where the spreader lites are drilled - these areas were poorly sealed-silicone,from the factory-water migrated in,cause a delamination/dry rotting problem...i've seen a few with stringer/transom core problems too...

again,parker's a good product-very well built - i read someone compare a parker to a grady-well,truthfully,the grady's built no where,close as well as a parker-the construction can not be compared,only thing they have in common,is the fact they're both made from fiberglass ;) a few years ago,i had a parker in for repairs,the boat popped off it's too small trailer and slid down the g/s parkway @ around 65mph-the damage was minimal for the abuse that boat withstood-i picked the boat up from the median,approx 200yards,where it first made impact with the road...i can honestly tell you,a lesser built boat,like a grady,or a proline-there would've been toothpicks to pick up,not a boat...the boat was a 2120,the hull was 1" thick solid fiberglass-where the raw water washdown pick-up is located...not many new boats are built that well-contrary to what owners stated...

hope the information helps you...

Chiefsurfer 04-05-2011 06:12 AM

I agree, Parkers are good boats, and they generally use great methods, but even the best, when using wood, can have issues. If buying new, you have a LOT less to worry about, because GENERALLY service personnel do a good job of sealing any holes, where the backyard mechanic may not. New, and it's only been done by good techs and the factory. Buying used, you have to be just as careful with parker as any other boat with wood.

As to the poor sealing by the factory. Just because it's an "original" looking seal, do not assume it is from the factory. Because of height, a lot of boats are trucked to the dealers with "parts" missing, and then employees of the dealer put it together once it is dropped off from the truck. I have done this work, and it was ok, never had any issues, just saying a "factory seal" may not in fact have been sealed at the factory depending on the boat you are looking at.

Bluefin039 04-05-2011 06:22 AM

I owned a Parker for 8 years and over those eight years I put many hours and many holes in the boat. I never had and issue with rotting. I can tell you that they use sturdy thick construction. Whenever I had to cut a hole in the boat I was surprised at how thick the construction was. These boats are solid built. Whenever a penetration was made somewhere it was treated and prepared properly and I never had any issues. I put gunnel rod holders in my parker and also in one of my friends top brand boats around the same time. Both boats had wood cored gunnels except mine were twice as thick.

Local Motion 04-05-2011 06:44 AM


Originally Posted by capecuddy (Post 3659672)
At the risk of getting flamed, what are the thoughts about Parker boats and their use of wooden structure in their fiberglass hulls? It seems all other manufacturers brag about "NO WOOD".

I was getting ready to not worry about it, but then noticed they only have a 5 year hull warranty vs 10 year and Lifetime in many others.

All other buzz here on THT that I've seen has been very positive about Parker boats.....so why shouldn't I be concerned?:banghead:



Oh no! A boat made with wood??????

Christopher Columbus used composite materials and the West System.

nexxxt214 04-05-2011 07:51 AM

Wood is better then anything else on the market.... all of the coring materials mimic real wood... just cheaper....tell you what, i rather get hit with a 2x4 of balsa core then pressure treated lumber hahah

chemoniepilot 02-21-2013 06:03 AM

when did parker boats stop useing wood?

Saltwater Dreams 02-21-2013 07:57 AM


Originally Posted by capecuddy (Post 3659672)
At the risk of getting flamed, what are the thoughts about Parker boats and their use of wooden structure in their fiberglass hulls? It seems all other manufacturers brag about "NO WOOD".

I was getting ready to not worry about it, but then noticed they only have a 5 year hull warranty vs 10 year and Lifetime in many others.

All other buzz here on THT that I've seen has been very positive about Parker boats.....so why shouldn't I be concerned?:banghead:

As a Parker dealer, just a quick heads up that Parker has now started to introduce foam core stringers, along with other changes, into their line up. Each model will slowly be updated with these changes going forward. Even the Parker color is changing....here's the new parker white with new metal logo...

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r...psfe7c12ca.jpg

A Few Dollars 02-21-2013 08:01 AM


Originally Posted by chemoniepilot (Post 5390906)
when did parker boats stop useing wood?

They haven't yet

shore thing 02-21-2013 09:02 AM

I have a buddy who makes a living replacing transoms, stringers and floors in Parker, C-Hawk and other manufactures who use wood. Granted they are older boats but some not that old. One of the main reasons I went with Judge Yachts when I bought my boat. No wood.

Mpellet 02-21-2013 09:15 AM


Originally Posted by Bluefin039 (Post 3660045)
I owned a Parker for 8 years and over those eight years I put many hours and many holes in the boat. I never had and issue with rotting. I can tell you that they use sturdy thick construction. Whenever I had to cut a hole in the boat I was surprised at how thick the construction was. These boats are solid built. Whenever a penetration was made somewhere it was treated and prepared properly and I never had any issues. I put gunnel rod holders in my parker and also in one of my friends top brand boats around the same time. Both boats had wood cored gunnels except mine were twice as thick.

When I installed the windlass on my 2520 I was astounded how thick the deck plating was, started the job with a cordless drill, finished after a trip to the Home Depot for a powerful plug in model and it was still time consuming and a LOT of work to cut that hole....

windknotnc 02-21-2013 06:11 PM

Parker uses box construction and all wood is encapsulated in glass. If there is ever any rot it is because of neglect. I bought a 1993 that sat on a lift for several years without the plug being removed. Over time it destroyed the stringers. Regardless of what structural support is under the floor, if you leave water in the hull closed up it will ruin the boat.

Prolineguy 02-21-2013 06:37 PM


Originally Posted by Saltwater Dreams (Post 5391366)
As a Parker dealer, just a quick heads up that Parker has now started to introduce foam core stringers, along with other changes, into their line up. Each model will slowly be updated with these changes going forward. Even the Parker color is changing....here's the new parker white with new metal logo...

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r...psfe7c12ca.jpg

Is there plan to eventually go No Wood?? If so, that really complicates this argument.

jobowker 02-21-2013 08:27 PM


Originally Posted by Paul Barnard (Post 3659910)
Don't be misled by the "no wood, no rot" sales hype. Water penetration will adversely affect any coring that is on the market today. I have seen "no rot" coring that was nothing but mush.

Yellowfin, Grady White, Parker and many other boats use wood in the construction. They all have a very good reputation. The key, as one other poster mentioned, is to properly care for the wood when you penetrate it. The same can be said any time you penetrate coring on a boat.

I don't understand why so many people miss this crucial point. ANY cored material can suffer damage from water, so your choices are 1) no coring, giving up strength and light weight, or 2) do the right thing to keep water out.

I couldn't care less what type of coring material failed - I just care that it failed.

They (companies like Parker) may eventually switch over to 'no wood' not because it's better, but just because you get tired of defending it to people who really don't understand the issue. If saying "no wood" gets you marketing points, and people finding out that there's wood in the hull lowers their perception, then at some point it doesn't matter if it's better - you do what will help sell boats.


Kinda like Etec owners having to explain that they're not old technology, smoky, gas hogs. :)

theolog 02-21-2013 08:52 PM


Originally Posted by Local Motion (Post 3660110)
Oh no! A boat made with wood??????

Christopher Columbus used composite materials and the West System.

LOL, no shit. The Albatross Fleet in Hatteras was the start of charter sportfishing...those boats are 75 years old and still going strong.


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:40 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.9.3.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.