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What if you don't replace a rotted transom?

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What if you don't replace a rotted transom?

Old 02-01-2011, 03:40 PM
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Default What if you don't replace a rotted transom?

I have seen many, many boats that had rotted transom's when I was looking for another boat. It seems like anything that is 10 years or older has 50% or more of the transom rotted. In looking at these boats there was no evidence of structural problems. Obviously there are a lot of boats that people run with rotted transom's and nothing seems to happen to the boats.

I had a rotted transom on my Scarab Sport with 2- 225HP outboards on an engine bracket. The only thing I noticed was the gap between the bracket and the transom had grown about an 1/8".

Has any one had a catastrophic failure from a rotted transom? I have never known anyone that have had anything happen to them from a rotted transom. I have a fishing buddy that owns a 19' Grady White and he has used the boat for over 10 years after he discovered he had serious rot in his transom. His opinion was it's an old boat and it's not worth the money to replace the transom.

Russ
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Old 02-01-2011, 03:45 PM
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eventually the motor will fall of the boat.
Old 02-01-2011, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Night Crawler View Post
eventually the motor will fall of the boat.
Eventually sure... but when? In 50 years?
Old 02-01-2011, 04:03 PM
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not a single person in the world can answer the question of how long it will last

you use your head- older boat, older engine, local trips, taking it easy- not as demanding on someone repowering especially with 4 strokes, going off shore, putting hundreds of hours on their boat

We replace them with little to no visual indication and we replaced them when the transoms are bowed and the engine does literally look like its falling off the boat
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Old 02-01-2011, 04:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Raybo Marine NY View Post
and we replaced them when the transoms are bowed and the engine does literally look like its falling off the boat
This is when I'd worry about it. But like Raybo said it's all about how you use the boat. Going 40 knots in big seas is going to be way different than putting around the harbor or even going offshore in calm weather.

Still, I too am interested in hearing if anybody has had their engine fall off... well besides that Midnight Express.
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Old 02-01-2011, 04:09 PM
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I guess you could do what this guy did for an easy fix. http://www.thehulltruth.com/boating-...x-bracket.html
Old 02-01-2011, 04:18 PM
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My transom on my old Bayliner rotted and finally cracked so that I could see daylight through it. I put some glass on it and ran it for another 3 years. I lost my ability to trim the motor up because when I accelerated, the transom would flex lowering the motor. It never did fall off though.
Old 02-01-2011, 04:25 PM
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Originally Posted by RussH View Post
I have seen many, many boats that had rotted transom's when I was looking for another boat. It seems like anything that is 10 years or older has 50% or more of the transom rotted. In looking at these boats there was no evidence of structural problems. Obviously there are a lot of boats that people run with rotted transom's and nothing seems to happen to the boats.

I had a rotted transom on my Scarab Sport with 2- 225HP outboards on an engine bracket. The only thing I noticed was the gap between the bracket and the transom had grown about an 1/8".

Has any one had a catastrophic failure from a rotted transom? I have never known anyone that have had anything happen to them from a rotted transom. I have a fishing buddy that owns a 19' Grady White and he has used the boat for over 10 years after he discovered he had serious rot in his transom. His opinion was it's an old boat and it's not worth the money to replace the transom.

Russ
Russ,
Tough question to answer.
Pretty impossible actually for a general answer to the question.
My opinion?
Rotten transoms are a very serious potential for a very major problem.
Ten years from now, it wont be so much of a question as it may be today.
More and more are wood free structures.
I've enjoyed back and forth to Bimini with the SCARAB SPORT I once owned. I had JOHNRUDES on the transom.
Today, would I make the trip with perhaps my family, knowing I had a rotten transom?
Not in this lifetime would I.
Old 02-01-2011, 04:50 PM
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Originally Posted by mike carrigan View Post
Today, would I make the trip with perhaps my family, knowing I had a rotten transom?
Not in this lifetime would I.








As much as I would love to spend a day on the water with you Mike, not in my lifetime either!!!

Old 02-01-2011, 05:24 PM
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I know what you all are saying about running it for years with a rotten transom, but I would be so worried about the cosequences that I would not be able to enjoy the boat. I would certainly not put the family on it.

That is just me. I would have to repair it or park it on the trailer.
Old 02-01-2011, 07:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Night Crawler View Post
eventually the motor will fall of the boat.

... and you'll have a BIG access door to pull in the tuna!

Regards,
Old 02-01-2011, 07:47 PM
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So what some of you are saying is that if it's an older boat it's not worth the money to replace the transom and you would just run it until it falls apart?

I would bet that 75% of the boaters w/ rotted transom's don't even know they are rotted. The only way they would ever know is if an engine fell off or as Bruce said you would have a really nice tuna door.

Russ
Old 02-01-2011, 08:51 PM
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Years ago a buddy and me where fishing 20+ miles off of Port Canaveral in his new [used ] Bayliner when a summer squall blew through. Well he panics as soon as the seas started to build and the wind began howling. While i am stowing the rods he guns the boat and proceeds to stuff the bow into a wave, then another wave came over the stern and almost swamped us....the impact into that first wave almost tore the engine off the ROTTED transom. We limped home at slower then a trolling speed in god awful conditions not knowing how long the engine would stay on the transom......short story for a long, long, friggin scary ordeal..

Moral of the story....replace the transom, don't go offshore with idiots and sell your bayliner
Old 02-01-2011, 11:04 PM
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Originally Posted by RussH View Post
So what some of you are saying is that if it's an older boat it's not worth the money to replace the transom and you would just run it until it falls apart?

I would bet that 75% of the boaters w/ rotted transom's don't even know they are rotted. The only way they would ever know is if an engine fell off or as Bruce said you would have a really nice tuna door.

Russ







Nope, I would dump it before someone gets killed... Or invest the money to properly replace it, if it was a boat worth investing that kind of money into to begin with...


And an engine doesn't have to fall off before even a beginner can figure out if the transom is bad. A ball-peen hammer and a keen ear is about all it takes to figure it out...


Just use the THT Search function on the subject of transom replacements. You'll find plenty of threads where the owners did a fine DIY project to replace not only the transom, but the stringers and deck too.
Old 02-02-2011, 03:34 AM
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Originally Posted by ABoater View Post
Nope, I would dump it before someone gets killed... Or invest the money to properly replace it, if it was a boat worth investing that kind of money into to begin with...


And an engine doesn't have to fall off before even a beginner can figure out if the transom is bad. A ball-peen hammer and a keen ear is about all it takes to figure it out...


Just use the THT Search function on the subject of transom replacements. You'll find plenty of threads where the owners did a fine DIY project to replace not only the transom, but the stringers and deck too.
You bring up a point that is well worth talking about.
The subject went to a transom, however, usually the issue is not limited to the transom.
If the transom is rotted, more than likely the stringers and floor are also.
It's going to vary some as to $$$ spent replacing rotten wood. Perhaps one brand to the next as to if the expense is worth it. I guess it's all in the view of the person making the decision.
In any case though, bad floors, maybe stringers too, would be less likely to cause a traumatic experiance. A bad transom however, that's a whole different issue.
Old 02-02-2011, 04:05 AM
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my customers love their boats, or at least like them alot, lol
They know it inside and out, it has wiring they know, they know the engine, they put alot of thought into their boat.
So now the transom is no good, is it better to spend some money on what you know or buy someone else's boat that you DONT know?

Do you buy new and take a big hit on depreciation? Remember your "rotted" transom boat is not worth what you think it is because the person shopping around sees its rotted.

So for what the transom will cost you what are going to replace the boat with?
Boats never make sense financially so throw that thought right out the window
Old 02-02-2011, 05:00 AM
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Just a thought, there is a big difference between a "wet" transom and a "rotted" transom. A transom will eventually rot if wet, but it could take years. Almost every boat I've taken apart has had a wet transom (some were wringing wet), most has very little rot, those with rot were almost completely gone. These were cracked and easily evident by a quick visual inspection, the wet transoms not so much.

The only two engines I've known to fall off, a Checkmate was out wave jumping and stuffed the transom (almost a backflip) , the other was an older aluminum bracket. The bracket had corroded around the stainless mounting bolts, top two bolts broke through and engine layed down into the water (bottom bolts held engine on boat, but engine was completely submerged)
Old 02-02-2011, 05:08 AM
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Skimmed through the above posts with just one thought coming to me....

"How much adventure are you looking to find?" Many years ago when I was on the water one or two days a week and fished with lots and lots of different boats, I had little appreciation of just how bad and how quickly it can go bad out on the water a long way from the ramp... I've been on boats that you could actually see the transom move as much as five or six inches when the owner would hit the throttle to get us up on plane (20' open fish...). These days with a lot more experience I'd never set foot on a rig with those kind of problems (if the transom is bad, what else is going on?).

If you have a bad transom - replace it. You can do it yourself or pay a pro to do it for you. If you can't afford to replace it then sell the rig and get out of boating. Any other option is just foolish.
Old 02-02-2011, 05:57 AM
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I would not keep running the boat if I knew it had a rotten transom, it's one thing if you don't know, or never thought to check, but if you know, it's like driving a car with a rotted frame, sooner or later the worst can happen. With boats, the repair cost/replacement cost debate is always an issue. It's not so much what it costs to repair relative the the value of the boat, it's what it costs to repair relative to the cost of replacing the boat. To me unless you are going to buy a new or late model boat (less than 3 years old) then repair makes sense. Any older wood framed boat can have rot and it's not always easy to tell. Sure you can do the sounding test but plywood can sound OK in the outer plys and still have rot within, most transoms are pretty thick which can mask that. Also you really can't check stringers unless they are exposed like in the engine compartment and ski lockers of sport boats. The deck yes you can feel flexing and then suspect rot. Now they have the composite boats, I don't know much about possible issues with them, but I'd guess if water got in the transom and then froze, you could get delamination theoretically. Not sure how much of an issue that could be.
Old 02-02-2011, 06:14 AM
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Default Now this is some funny and true shit here. I have seen boats like this bayliner

Originally Posted by sbohlen View Post
My transom on my old Bayliner rotted and finally cracked so that I could see daylight through it. I put some glass on it and ran it for another 3 years. I lost my ability to trim the motor up because when I accelerated, the transom would flex lowering the motor. It never did fall off though.
And I never did hear of a transom or motor falling in the water because of a wet transom. I get paid to fix them sometimes and I have never told anyone not to fix it? I have seen stainless and aluminum elaborate and simple fixes that seem to work or help a little. It is what you are comfortable with. I will never for get years ago one of the carolina local pound net boats had a pipe wrench get stuck on the steering wheel shaft?? and the commercial fisherman drove that boat with an old pipe wrench locked on the shaft. It would not come off so he used it in the sound behind hatteras???? I guess if your transom is flexing and your motor wont trim up any more because of the flex its OK but when you can see daylight its time to not run the bayliner to the canyon?

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