Go Back  The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum > BOATING FORUMS > The Boating Forum
Reload this Page >

What if you don't replace a rotted transom?

Notices
The Boating Forum

What if you don't replace a rotted transom?

Old 02-02-2011, 09:40 PM
  #61  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Saigon, Vietnam
Posts: 2,200
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

There is about no teak in VN. This one comes from Burma, that has the best old slowly grown good grain british plantation teak (that is a long word).
For having been 11 years in furniture business, yes a lot of hard timber are giving sawmills and wood machines hard time because of war remains. And for those who say that copper nails kill a tree,... ;?
Old 02-05-2011, 01:09 PM
  #62  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 7,134
Likes: 0
Received 12 Likes on 7 Posts
Default

Just make sure you have at least 10 feet of chain and a well wired shackle connected to your lifting ring. Then tie off 50 feet of 1" line and an anchor ball. Once she goes, you will have a nice mooring...
Old 02-06-2011, 11:57 AM
  #63  
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Northern Ohio
Posts: 15,960
Received 1,849 Likes on 989 Posts
Default

Are you telling me that teak WON'T rot, EVER? If that is the case I was not aware of that.

I can confirm the comment made by Reggie Fountain as it pertains to my Scarab Sport. The guy that rebuilt my transom said he had never replaced a transom that was as difficult as the one in my Scarab. He said the boat was built like a brick $hit house. In fact, he said he would probably never do another one.

My transom was basically dust, I don't know how long the boat as used after the transom rotted away. Because there was nothing outwardly like stress cracks or any other sign of structural problems, I truly believe I could have continued to run the boat with a rotted transom basically forever. I replaced it because it was worth it.
The old Thompson I am running now probably has some transom rot in it, they all do as Erie Skipper mentioned. I only paid $3,200 for the boat and I will run the boat until it falls apart because it's simply not worth spending the money to rebuild the transom. Last year I sounded out the transom before I put the boat in the water for the season and I know there is some good wood left. Unless I see some evidence of structural problems I'm simply not going to worry about it any more. If the boat developes problems because of the transom I will yank the engine, the outdrive, and scrap the rest of the boat.

Russ
Old 02-06-2011, 12:28 PM
  #64  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location:
Posts: 1,872
Likes: 0
Received 47 Likes on 37 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by RussH View Post
Are you telling me that teak WON'T rot, EVER? If that is the case I was not aware of that.

I can confirm the comment made by Reggie Fountain as it pertains to my Scarab Sport. The guy that rebuilt my transom said he had never replaced a transom that was as difficult as the one in my Scarab. He said the boat was built like a brick $hit house. In fact, he said he would probably never do another one.

My transom was basically dust, I don't know how long the boat as used after the transom rotted away. Because there was nothing outwardly like stress cracks or any other sign of structural problems, I truly believe I could have continued to run the boat with a rotted transom basically forever. I replaced it because it was worth it.
The old Thompson I am running now probably has some transom rot in it, they all do as Erie Skipper mentioned. I only paid $3,200 for the boat and I will run the boat until it falls apart because it's simply not worth spending the money to rebuild the transom. Last year I sounded out the transom before I put the boat in the water for the season and I know there is some good wood left. Unless I see some evidence of structural problems I'm simply not going to worry about it any more. If the boat developes problems because of the transom I will yank the engine, the outdrive, and scrap the rest of the boat.

Russ
Sounds like the right way to go Russ; just keep an eye out for water intrusion and see on the reefs!!
Old 10-25-2015, 09:09 PM
  #65  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Mt Laurel NJ
Posts: 1,242
Received 307 Likes on 174 Posts
Default

I'm going to start cutting into my Grady white transom this week and plan on a detailed build thread.

I'm going to use TRK - 2000, it's a polyurethane 3 part 14 pound foam that has fiberglass strands mixed in.

PU bonds to wood and has the ability to flex before it fails.

Does anyone have experience with this product?
Old 10-25-2015, 09:57 PM
  #66  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 5,546
Received 464 Likes on 289 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by RussH View Post
I have seen many, many boats that had rotted transom's when I was looking for another boat. It seems like anything that is 10 years or older has 50% or more of the transom rotted. In looking at these boats there was no evidence of structural problems. Obviously there are a lot of boats that people run with rotted transom's and nothing seems to happen to the boats. I had a rotted transom on my Scarab Sport with 2- 225HP outboards on an engine bracket. The only thing I noticed was the gap between the bracket and the transom had grown about an 1/8". Has any one had a catastrophic failure from a rotted transom? I have never known anyone that have had anything happen to them from a rotted transom. I have a fishing buddy that owns a 19' Grady White and he has used the boat for over 10 years after he discovered he had serious rot in his transom. His opinion was it's an old boat and it's not worth the money to replace the transom. Russ
It all depends on the boat and the power. An uncle of mine had a wood chris craft ski boat someone put an outboard on. It sat on the trailer for a few years and the weight of it pulled the transom apart. That was an extreme example but it happened. A boat with a big single, pair or triple outboards hanging off the back will make the problem more relevant.Inboard boat like you have and it should not be a big deal at all.
Old 10-25-2015, 10:52 PM
  #67  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Back in suzhou in China again
Posts: 3,568
Likes: 0
Received 254 Likes on 198 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by RussH View Post
I have seen many, many boats that had rotted transom's when I was looking for another boat. It seems like anything that is 10 years or older has 50% or more of the transom rotted. In looking at these boats there was no evidence of structural problems. Obviously there are a lot of boats that people run with rotted transom's and nothing seems to happen to the boats.

I had a rotted transom on my Scarab Sport with 2- 225HP outboards on an engine bracket. The only thing I noticed was the gap between the bracket and the transom had grown about an 1/8".

Has any one had a catastrophic failure from a rotted transom? I have never known anyone that have had anything happen to them from a rotted transom. I have a fishing buddy that owns a 19' Grady White and he has used the boat for over 10 years after he discovered he had serious rot in his transom. His opinion was it's an old boat and it's not worth the money to replace the transom.

Russ
If its made in America it must be good !! apart from the motors falling off and the water coming in very quickly and not being able to swim what is there to worry about !!;?
What a silly question !!
Old 10-26-2015, 03:29 AM
  #68  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsyltucky
Posts: 7,573
Received 1,638 Likes on 770 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by tunnles View Post
If its made in America it must be good !! apart from the motors falling off and the water coming in very quickly and not being able to swim what is there to worry about !!;?
What a silly question !!
Almost as silly as responding to a 5 yr old post
Old 01-19-2016, 06:01 AM
  #69  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Homosassa, Florida
Posts: 255
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by XV2PS View Post
Yep,

I've done mine with solid teak lamination. I would not care any water intrusion anymore:

Isn't composite (i.e. Coosa Bluewater) less expensive than teak? Why not use that?
Old 01-19-2016, 07:55 AM
  #70  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Fort Pierce,FL
Posts: 6,440
Received 1,256 Likes on 815 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by RussH View Post
I have seen many, many boats that had rotted transom's when I was looking for another boat. It seems like anything that is 10 years or older has 50% or more of the transom rotted. In looking at these boats there was no evidence of structural problems. Obviously there are a lot of boats that people run with rotted transom's and nothing seems to happen to the boats.

I had a rotted transom on my Scarab Sport with 2- 225HP outboards on an engine bracket. The only thing I noticed was the gap between the bracket and the transom had grown about an 1/8".

Has any one had a catastrophic failure from a rotted transom? I have never known anyone that have had anything happen to them from a rotted transom. I have a fishing buddy that owns a 19' Grady White and he has used the boat for over 10 years after he discovered he had serious rot in his transom. His opinion was it's an old boat and it's not worth the money to replace the transom.

Russ
That's like living in a house you know has a gas leak.
Old 01-19-2016, 08:03 AM
  #71  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: South East Louisiana
Posts: 11,191
Received 950 Likes on 678 Posts
Default

Cajun transom band aid.

Name:  image_zpsjfcvmczw.jpg
Views: 2271
Size:  456.6 KB
Old 01-19-2016, 09:10 AM
  #72  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 149
Received 20 Likes on 16 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Joe View Post
If the transom rots..cut a hole in the front and mount the engine there!


This driver just gotta love the smell of exhaust
Old 01-19-2016, 10:36 AM
  #73  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 169
Received 101 Likes on 38 Posts
Default

My buddy(isn't that how they all start) bought his first boat, it had a rotten transom. Loaded up for the first trip, hit the gas, engine is laying on the floor. Entire transom caved in. Engine sitting in the back of the boat still running/prop spinning. Girlfriends scatter, he yells to sit down because something is wrong. Then he sees the engine and water filling the boat. Boat sank to the gunnels, coolers,beer,purses and everything else was in the water or sinking. The throttle and steering still work with the engine sitting on the floor.
No pics cuz the camera sunk.
Old 01-19-2016, 11:05 AM
  #74  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 606
Received 17 Likes on 11 Posts
Cool Grady White Transom

This was Posted 10-26-2015, 12:09 AM
Originally Posted by gotboostedvr6 View Post
I'm going to start cutting into my Grady white transom this week and plan on a detailed build thread.

I'm going to use TRK - 2000, it's a polyurethane 3 part 14 pound foam that has fiberglass strands mixed in.

PU bonds to wood and has the ability to flex before it fails.

Does anyone have experience with this product?
I will try and find the above mentioned thread.

In 1996 I paid $6k for a 1991 Grady White 175 Spirit, a very small (17' 5") GW, came with the Yamaha 90.

In 1997 I drilled two 1/2" holes through transom to attach a Honda 'kicker' motor mounting timber.

Construction observed while drilling was fiberglass, then wood that seemed a little damper than I would like for a half inch or so and then a half inch of solid aluminum, then wood again before outer fiberglass. I sealed the holes with epoxy and then the half-inch bolts and two inch washers thoroughly with 5200.

Now nearly nineteen years later, I can find no signs of transom rot and am considering a re-power, which would give opportunity for removing that aluminum angle bar across top, outer edge of transom and reseal it again. This top angle was reported to be the weak link in a Grady's transom and I did reseal its screws but could never remove it without removing the Yamaha first. And after removing it, should it just be left completely off or was it also 'structural' to the transom?

Is this heavy-duty aluminum plate a construction part of all GW's or other manufacturer's Transom Construction and how would that factor into any possible transom reconstruction? Seems like you would have to leave the aluminum in place and have to rebuild from both sides, very complicated job from the forward side with the design of the Spirit. Hope that issue never arises for me and by then it would just be scrap time for the boat.
Art
Old 09-09-2016, 12:53 PM
  #75  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Back in Colorado, but northern part this time.
Posts: 176
Likes: 0
Received 16 Likes on 14 Posts
Default

Have a 1992 Celebrity 200 Cuddy and are currently getting ready to replace a portion of our transom. "Transom Plate" is what the fiberglass guy calls it. Last month, during a Marine Service "water test" for a remanufactured carb we had put on, the mechanic noticed quite a bit of water in the bilge area while adjusting the new carb. Brought the boat back into Dry Storage dock and onto a wash rack. He called me to take a look at it. After taking the plug out, quite a bit of water came out of the bilge.
It was decided to take out the engine and transom assy./drive. Around the hole where the transom assy./drive goes, it was fairly rotted. So, will have that replaced. Then, found out the transom assy was in very bad shape. Will replace that as well. Drive and engine are fine.
We'd rather pay
out the money to fix than have the boat sink!
Old 09-09-2016, 02:19 PM
  #76  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Southern Ocean
Posts: 661
Received 113 Likes on 58 Posts
Default

And for those suggesting engines removing themselves from a rotten transom at speed is unlikely, i present....


Name:  IMG_1914_zpsdlx3kwoi.jpg
Views: 2245
Size:  139.6 KB

That happened earlier this year a long way from home in remote southcoast trucking along at cruise speed. Very very fotunate more catestrophic damage wasnt done to the hull as the engine said bye byes.

Engines were brand new. One now resides in 200ft of water.
Old 09-09-2016, 02:29 PM
  #77  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 11
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

And that will do it. It was a bad day for this boater. About 14k or more gone with a blink of an eye.
Old 05-09-2021, 01:00 PM
  #78  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default Transom - Trouble

I just got a 1232 Jon Boat unused 15 -17 years abused before that (I mean maybe a drunk boater had it; dings and scratches) but mostly in good condition paint and rivets tightly adherent. When I was giving it a good over looking I found a hole in the bottom probably a sharp rock. Also, The boat was full of large ants coming form under the benches and out of the transom. Which also had pitting that looked like microscopic Swiss cheese. The price was right but as with any free puppy shots and vet bills are going to rake me. I started the transom work but I am wondering if that would effect things like titling and registration?

Originally Posted by RussH View Post
I have seen many, many boats that had rotted transom's when I was looking for another boat. It seems like anything that is 10 years or older has 50% or more of the transom rotted. In looking at these boats there was no evidence of structural problems. Obviously there are a lot of boats that people run with rotted transom's and nothing seems to happen to the boats.

I had a rotted transom on my Scarab Sport with 2- 225HP outboards on an engine bracket. The only thing I noticed was the gap between the bracket and the transom had grown about an 1/8".

Has any one had a catastrophic failure from a rotted transom? I have never known anyone that have had anything happen to them from a rotted transom. I have a fishing buddy that owns a 19' Grady White and he has used the boat for over 10 years after he discovered he had serious rot in his transom. His opinion was it's an old boat and it's not worth the money to replace the transom.

Russ
Old 05-09-2021, 01:07 PM
  #79  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

That's why when I got mine I did a throughout inspection. I too thought I would be on the water but the beautiful B.O.A.T (Break Out Another Thousand) was not quite seaworthy.
Old 05-09-2021, 01:15 PM
  #80  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 5,212
Received 1,340 Likes on 651 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by VanW View Post
Eventually sure... but when? In 50 years?
nah, during that once in a lifetime storm that pops up out of no where and you are caught right smack in the middle of it.

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.