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What Tools and Spare PArts Should I Carry Onboard?

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What Tools and Spare PArts Should I Carry Onboard?

Old 01-12-2021, 07:27 AM
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Default What Tools and Spare PArts Should I Carry Onboard?

I've been giving this a lot of thought lately. I have a 25' center console with a single outboard on a bracket. I usually fish about 20 miles offshore. I'm trying to come up with a reasonable selection of tools and parts that would get me through most emergencies that I could realistically expect to deal with while in the water. What tools and parts do you guys carry onboard?

Here's what I've come up with so far (with suggestions from below added for completeness):
Spare prop (with a length of paracord connected to it so it can be tied off to the boat while trying to install it in the water)
Spare prop nut and cotter pin
Floating prop wrench
Spare ignition key
Brass hose splice for fuel lines
Various hose clamps
A couple short lengths of fuel line
Fuses
Wood thru-hull plugs
Self amalgamating tape
Screwdriver with multiple tips
Adjustable wrench
Small socket set
Manual bilge pump
Duct tape
Zip ties
Spare 3' hydraulic hose (for steering hose between the transom and motor)
Hydraulic steering fluid and fill adapter
Channel Locks
Role of electrical wire
Electrical tape
Wirecutter
Needle nose pliers
Spare AA and AAA batteries
Multimeter
Silicone
Super Glue
Epoxy
Butt connectors
Heavy duty knife for defowling a prop

mask, fins, snorkel
Bungy cords and/or ratchet straps
Spare fuel filter

Last edited by Calla9; 01-12-2021 at 01:46 PM.
Old 01-12-2021, 07:33 AM
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You didn't mention a SeaTow or BoatUS membership. That to me is an important spare part. Get it back to ramp, home, then repair.

But your list looks extensive, although not sure about the extra prop.

Rmpl
Old 01-12-2021, 07:45 AM
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multi meter, several feet of wire, pliers.

check to make sure you can get your ratchet and a wrench on what you might need to work on. maybe a set or ratchet wrenches could work if your sockets and ratchet wont fit.

as you do your routine maintenance, keep a list of all the tools you use and assess whether those should be included
Old 01-12-2021, 07:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Rmplstlskn View Post
You didn't mention a SeaTow or BoatUS membership. That to me is an important spare part. Get it back to ramp, home, then repair.

But your list looks extensive, although not sure about the extra prop.

Rmpl
True. I have both Sea Tow and Boat US (Boat US is part of my insurance policy, already had Sea Tow).
As for the prop, I just replaced mine to go with a 4 blade and when I removed the old one, the hub disintegrated in my hands. Could have easily become a problem if it let go offshore.
Old 01-12-2021, 07:51 AM
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Some people may disagree with me, but it's pretty hard to change a prop in the water. Probably just better off calling SeaTow or Towboat US.

Channel Locks
Role of electrical wire
Electrical tape
Wirecutter
Needle nose pliers
Spare AA and AAA batteries
Multimeter
Silicone
Super Glue
Epoxy
Butt connectors

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Old 01-12-2021, 08:07 AM
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I appreciate the replies! I added all the suggestions to the original list to keep it complete.
I've seen a lot of really great threads discussing safety gear and thought this would be a good discussion as well. I hope others find it useful.
Old 01-12-2021, 08:48 AM
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Changing a prop on an outboard with a bracket while offshore is going to be extremely difficult, if not impossible, so I wouldn't bother carrying a spare.
As far as spare parts: fuel filter, fuses, some spare wire and connectors is about all I have. On tools: screwdrivers (#1, #2, 3/16 & 1/4, #2 & 1/4 stubby and a multi-tip one (#20, #25 & #20 Torqx, combination wrenches (1/4-3/4"), pliers (slip joint, wiring crimpers, needle nose and std), strap wrench for fuel filter and multi-meter. I also have a fishing knifes, fishing pliers, multi-tool in my fishing gear that stays on the boat.
Old 01-12-2021, 09:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Rmplstlskn View Post
You didn't mention a SeaTow or BoatUS membership. That to me is an important spare part. Get it back to ramp, home, then repair.
All you need is the following:
Seatow or Boat US membership
VHF radio
Garmin Inreach/ Sat phone
EPIRB or PLB
Good anchor and a respectable amount of anchor line

In my opinion, (That I already know will be argued with), is that I would rather have sea tow bring me back in where I can take the boat home and fix it. I dont want to fix my boat offshore which would be nearly impossible and limp it back home possibly causing more damage. I pay for the seatow membership for a reason, the rest is the stuff listed above is for emergencies and too communicate.
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Old 01-12-2021, 09:04 AM
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All good suggestions. I started carrying a spare IAC after having one go out 30 miles out. I also carry a full automotive toolset. Currently I have Kobalt set that is rusting up good, so they do need to be replaced every few years, but it has screw driver and nut driver attachments, adjustable wrench...
Old 01-12-2021, 09:41 AM
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mask, fins, snorkel
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Old 01-12-2021, 09:49 AM
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Originally Posted by hnmoss View Post
mask, fins, snorkel
Valid!!
Old 01-12-2021, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by MattJimm View Post
All you need is the following:
Seatow or Boat US membership
VHF radio
Garmin Inreach/ Sat phone
EPIRB or PLB
Good anchor and a respectable amount of anchor line

In my opinion, (That I already know will be argued with), is that I would rather have sea tow bring me back in where I can take the boat home and fix it. I dont want to fix my boat offshore which would be nearly impossible and limp it back home possibly causing more damage. I pay for the seatow membership for a reason, the rest is the stuff listed above is for emergencies and too communicate.
I agree that you want to be able to have sea tow bring you back in, but it would really suck to have to do that if you could have done a quick easy repair yourself.

also, sitting adrift for a couple hours could be extremely dangerous depending on the issue and conditions.

self reliance is key, but have sea tow as a back up

Last edited by SeaTreker; 01-12-2021 at 01:02 PM.
Old 01-12-2021, 09:51 AM
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I'd agree about changing the prop in the water - I tried it once - not because it was damaged but because someone had got fishing line round it and I didn't want to run back and risk the seal - couldn't do it. But if you fancy your chances, you'll need very calm water, a non-inflatable PFD and a safety line as you'll either need to be in the water or leaning over the engine to such an extent you'll risk falling in.

Old 01-12-2021, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by SeaTreker View Post
I agree that you want to be able to have sea tow bring you back in, but it would really suck to have to do that if you could have done a quick easy repair yourself.

also, sitting adrift for a couple hours could be extremely dangerous depend on the issue and conditions.

self reliance is key, but have sea tow as a back up
Exactly! If the problem you're experiencing is an electrical issue preventing you from calling for help, would be nice to be able to fix it. Or, if a seacock breaks off at the hull and the boat starts filling with water, it would be nice to have those wooden plugs to stop the leak. Almost every real emergency I've read about is a culmination of numerous events/failures that lead to disaster. I want to be as prepared as possible. Not afraid to call Sea Tow or Boat US, just want options. Not to mention, even if it's not an emergency, it may save a day on the water.
Old 01-12-2021, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Clinker View Post
I'd agree about changing the prop in the water - I tried it once - not because it was damaged but because someone had got fishing line round it and I didn't want to run back and risk the seal - couldn't do it. But if you fancy your chances, you'll need very calm water, a non-inflatable PFD and a safety line as you'll either need to be in the water or leaning over the engine to such an extent you'll risk falling in.
If the water wasn't calm, I would consider it a major safety risk to even try to change a prop. I would absolutely have to get in the water to do it, but I think I could if it was pretty calm. I wouldn't go out and buy a prop to carry as a spare, but since I have one, I'll carry it.
Old 01-12-2021, 11:29 AM
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Awesome list. I recently ran over a floating rope in the water. Was handy to have a boat hook in the boat. A long gaff would have worked too. I untangled the rope without getting wet.

EPIRB should be onboard as well. Or a Garmin InReach or similar
Old 01-12-2021, 12:25 PM
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Originally Posted by skipjackrick View Post
Awesome list. I recently ran over a floating rope in the water. Was handy to have a boat hook in the boat. A long gaff would have worked too. I untangled the rope without getting wet.

EPIRB should be onboard as well. Or a Garmin InReach or similar
Good point about a boat hook, I can see several times where that could be useful. I always have a gaff on the boat, so that should suffice. Agree about the safety equipment and I have that stuff, just wanting a discussion about parts and tools since there's been tons of discussion about safety gear.
Old 01-12-2021, 12:39 PM
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A spare 30 pack as you wait for Sea Tow
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Old 01-12-2021, 01:28 PM
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Seems like you are missing a piece of 2x4 for between the prop and cavitation plate for changing the prop. I would also bring some clamps to hold it to plate like I use on land

Fuel filter and whatever to install it would be another easy thing to keep onboard that I don't think I see mentioned

Bungy cords and/or ratchet straps as they can be extra set of hands or keep something in place that broke
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Old 01-12-2021, 02:03 PM
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Originally Posted by MattJimm View Post
All you need is the following:
Seatow or Boat US membership
VHF radio
Garmin Inreach/ Sat phone
EPIRB or PLB
Good anchor and a respectable amount of anchor line

In my opinion, (That I already know will be argued with), is that I would rather have sea tow bring me back in where I can take the boat home and fix it. I dont want to fix my boat offshore which would be nearly impossible and limp it back home possibly causing more damage. I pay for the seatow membership for a reason, the rest is the stuff listed above is for emergencies and too communicate.
Originally Posted by SeaTreker View Post
I agree that you want to be able to have sea tow bring you back in, but it would really suck to have to do that if you could have done a quick easy repair yourself.

also, sitting adrift for a couple hours could be extremely dangerous depending on the issue and conditions.

self reliance is key, but have sea tow as a back up
You wont be adrift if you anchor, thats why I added a good anchor and respectable amount of line. Just now realizing that your on the East coast of Florida, but still important to have.


Originally Posted by Calla9 View Post
Exactly! If the problem you're experiencing is an electrical issue preventing you from calling for help, would be nice to be able to fix it. Or, if a seacock breaks off at the hull and the boat starts filling with water, it would be nice to have those wooden plugs to stop the leak. Almost every real emergency I've read about is a culmination of numerous events/failures that lead to disaster. I want to be as prepared as possible. Not afraid to call Sea Tow or Boat US, just want options. Not to mention, even if it's not an emergency, it may save a day on the water.
If you rip your seacock off and you start taking on water. Your best option is to head to the crib and call Coast Guard / Sea Tow and tell them that your taking on water and heading back in so they can escort you with a dewatering pump. Those wooden plugs might help a little bit if you can get it in, but it wont beat a properly working bilge pump and 4500 rpms headed back to the ramp.

All in all, I respect your list and get where you are coming from. I am just a big believer in preventative maintenance. I not planning on diagnosing and working on my boat offshore. Im not fixing a four stroke outboard with a screwdriver and a pair of pliers nor am I rewiring a Bilge pump when I am taking on water. Those things get addressed before I take my boat out. If something happens out there I am calling seatow or the Coast guard

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