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Post your Trawler pictures! I'm getting ready to take it slow!

Old 01-03-2021, 02:17 PM
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Arrow Post your Trawler pictures! I'm getting ready to take it slow!

Starting to home in on a Nordhavn. Just have to decide a few things... Not sure how many on here are of the same ilk.

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01-03-2021, 07:37 PM
jamesdean
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I made the plunge in 2019... here's my 1976 Hatteras 58 LRC....
  • 2450 gallons fuel (3400 mile range)
  • 650 gallons fresh water
  • 55 tons
  • Cruise 8-9 knots
  • Stand Up engine room
  • (2) 20kW Northern Lights Generators
  • Twin DD 671 Naturals - 173 HP each





























Old 01-03-2021, 03:45 PM
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How big? They are really slow!!! Don't be in a rush.
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Old 01-03-2021, 04:01 PM
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Would be great to know more about length, plans for use etc!
Old 01-03-2021, 04:02 PM
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You don’t need to have a trawler to run at hull speed. Eight knots is what I cruise at.
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Old 01-03-2021, 04:09 PM
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I think one of the first decisions is whether or not you want full displacement or semidisplacement.
For full displacement, weight is not an issue. They will often have deep drafts and round bilges. They will roll easier than other boats, and with less attenuation. But also with less roll angle. The best way to describe it is that the boat doesn't fight as hard to stay perpendicular to teh water plane. Speed will be determined by square root of waterline length. For s speed/length ratio of 1.0, a 49' can do 7 knots. A hair over 9 knots would take you to an S/L ration of 1.3, which is close to your limit. For a 40 footer, your s/l ration of 1.0 is at 6.3 knots, and 1.3 would be around 8.2 knots.
Semi-displacement opens up more choices. You can travel at displacement speed and be ALMOST as efficient as a full displacement hull, or go wide open and more than double your speed when needed, but at four times the fuel consumption. They won't have the tankage or range of a full displacement boat. A semi-displacement boat won't make it to Europe, where a Nordhavn easily can. But you'd need some modifications to a Nordhavn to be able to do the Great Loop, and the draft would make it difficult.

Fair warning - I've seen a few Nordhavns around here (some moored, some under way) and they look downright majestic on the water. It's hard NOT to want one after seeing them in person.
Old 01-03-2021, 04:39 PM
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Originally Posted by jobowker View Post
I think one of the first decisions is whether or not you want full displacement or semidisplacement.
For full displacement, weight is not an issue. They will often have deep drafts and round bilges. They will roll easier than other boats, and with less attenuation. But also with less roll angle. The best way to describe it is that the boat doesn't fight as hard to stay perpendicular to teh water plane. Speed will be determined by square root of waterline length. For s speed/length ratio of 1.0, a 49' can do 7 knots. A hair over 9 knots would take you to an S/L ration of 1.3, which is close to your limit. For a 40 footer, your s/l ration of 1.0 is at 6.3 knots, and 1.3 would be around 8.2 knots.
Semi-displacement opens up more choices. You can travel at displacement speed and be ALMOST as efficient as a full displacement hull, or go wide open and more than double your speed when needed, but at four times the fuel consumption. They won't have the tankage or range of a full displacement boat. A semi-displacement boat won't make it to Europe, where a Nordhavn easily can. But you'd need some modifications to a Nordhavn to be able to do the Great Loop, and the draft would make it difficult.

Fair warning - I've seen a few Nordhavns around here (some moored, some under way) and they look downright majestic on the water. It's hard NOT to want one after seeing them in person.
Yes on the majestic nature. 100% agree...
And resale is astounding.

The great loop is sort of a crappy point, but we've decided that our desire to run through the Panama canal and up to AK exceeds our desire to the great loop. Plus we can still run up the east coast of the USA and Canada and then all the Gulf. No to mention the Bahamas and the rest of the islands.

It's the right boat for us. And I'm at a point now where I want to enjoy the trip. If it takes me a week to get there... I don't care. But I want to get there.

The thought of going to Inagua from SE Florida and having a ton of fuel left is very appealing to me.

I always thought I wanted a power cat... but the Nord is just too nice.
Old 01-03-2021, 04:51 PM
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Well made and a great " where do I want to go " cruiser. Seen several in my cruising time but really wanted a Fleming .
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Old 01-03-2021, 05:04 PM
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Have you looked at krogen, outer reef ect. Nordhaven had some real issues with their big boats. Check out the litigation over it and how they handled it. Marlow is junk and really screwed up the big 90's they built. Nordhaven has a better marketing department than other builders but not a better boat. Almost all trawlers are built in china or Taiwan, some yards are good some not. I've been to the yards personally. Brokers and current owners opinions are tainted. Speak to a couple naval architects they know who's doing it right.
Old 01-03-2021, 05:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Slimshady04 View Post
Have you looked at krogen, outer reef ect. Nordhaven had some real issues with their big boats. Check out the litigation over it and how they handled it. Marlow is junk and really screwed up the big 90's they built. Nordhaven has a better marketing department than other builders but not a better boat. Almost all trawlers are built in china or Taiwan, some yards are good some not. I've been to the yards personally. Brokers and current owners opinions are tainted. Speak to a couple naval architects they know who's doing it right.
I'm looking at a Nordhavn 40... pre China (USA made)... I saw the one Nord that was a debacle... but that appeared to be a one-tie case, no?

Give me ideas... I've looked at Selene and Kadey... they are "ok" but don't have a lot of the things I like about the Nord.

Also, a lot of the "smaller" 40 sizes are older as they have gone on to make bigger boats in the "newer" years...

But... give me ideas to look at! I'm open!
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Old 01-03-2021, 06:08 PM
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Don't know if they are in budget but flemings and outereef are both excellent. Great quality and resale. Builder stands behind the products. The big nordhaven was a one off but look closely at the quality of build, beyond bad and then they fought him in court. I won't deal with a builder like that.
I look at total cost of ownership not purchase price alone. Fleming and OR are very strong with resale and have a loyal following.
They both are faster boats too, in displacement hulls every trip is an all nighter and that wears on you and family quick. Can't get out of bad approaching weather. When your chugging all night in rough water at 6 knots and everyone is sick and tired you'll remember this conversation. I've been there and it sucks.
Btw my parents got to fla from cali on a 40ft sailboat in the 60's, great trip and memories for life.
Old 01-03-2021, 06:38 PM
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I plan to retire aboard a Nordhavn 86.


Old 01-03-2021, 06:41 PM
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You are going to get a number of opinions. I have made the journey you are considering 3 times but in long range motor sailers (range under power of 3,000 miles). There have been a few issues with Nordhavns, but they were far between. I have looked at used "other" boats at Trawler Fest and similar gatherings. The several year old used Nordhavn's were in far better condition the vast majority of the other "Trawlers". All of my friends who own Nordhavn's loved them. The Fleming is a beautiful boat. I have had two friends who did some offshore cruising in theirs, and sold them. They were just not as able in rough weather. The Kadey Krogen are great boats, and a few have made long passages. They are certainly one of the most efficient hulls, but also do tend to roll. Also a number of the earlier boats had considerable osmosis issues. But they have just been repaired and keep on going... Some decent bargains there.

The trip you are proposing to AK. has potential some serious weather. It will be pretty much "down hill from the Eastern Caribbean to Panama. There can be serious weather out of Panama, then in the Gulf of Papagayo as you come into Nicaragua. Further North, just above the Mexican border with Guatemala, is the Gulf of Tehuantepec. Both of these can have hard offshore blows when Northers from the Gulf of Mexico blow across the narrow parts of Central America. I have seen winds as high as 80 knots in Papagayo. After you leave Cabo San Lucas Baja, it is pretty much of a buck up hill to San Diego. Then from Santa Barbara to Morro Bay it can get rough around Pt. Conception, Same can hold true up North of San Francisco, and off Cape Mendocino. The relatively easy part is the Inland Passage to AK. I have also enjoyed cruising the Western Caribbean-Yucatan to Roatan, Honduras, Rio Dulce, San Andres, Providencia and the San Blas Islands.

Don't discount the older Nordhavn 46, it is the boat that really started Nordhavn's run, and several have circumnavigated. Still good boats--and some have been constantly brought up to current standards. The 57 is a lot of offshore cruiser's favorite, and still not out of the park cost wise. Consider the resale when buying a vessel of this size and type. (My all time favorite remains the classic 62). In any of these consider what the stabilization system is going to be and your tolerance for roll and pitch.

​​​​​​​Personally I would choose the Nordhavn. We did sail along side a Defever Long Range Cruiser 40 which circumnavigated South America. Very capable vessel. This one was US made. Defever and Hatteras both have made Long Range cruisers which are very capable, most are getting long in the tooth... I would not choose a Nordhavn passage maker for just East Coast cruising if that was my only goal.

Enjoy the planing, the hunt, and the trip!
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Old 01-03-2021, 06:51 PM
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My "Powerball Boat": the Nordhavn Expedition Yachtfisher 75.
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Old 01-03-2021, 07:37 PM
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I made the plunge in 2019... here's my 1976 Hatteras 58 LRC....
  • 2450 gallons fuel (3400 mile range)
  • 650 gallons fresh water
  • 55 tons
  • Cruise 8-9 knots
  • Stand Up engine room
  • (2) 20kW Northern Lights Generators
  • Twin DD 671 Naturals - 173 HP each





























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30West, Barrington, fishbum69, Gali, mark101, mymojo, r.waddill, rocksandblues, Salem Sound, Schmaltz~Herring, SHE GONE and 6 others liked this post. (Show less...)
Old 01-03-2021, 08:28 PM
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Have a look at North Pacific Yachts. https://northpacificyachts.com/

More common on the West Coast but you could buy one on the west Coast, go to Alaska then back home. I've looked a a couple of them and they appear to be very well made. One might be in my future when I retire and move to Vancouver Island.
Old 01-03-2021, 09:47 PM
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Pete,
I think you have young kids, correct?
We had a Nordic Tug and we loved it as a family boat. We took many
trips to our local islands and Catalina island.
Made some great memories but eventually sold the boat because it was too slow.
It would take us about 8 hours to go to Catalina from Ventura harbor.
My kids would go nuts after about 5 hours on the boat at 8-10 knots.
I personally loved it as the captain with my family aboard.
The wife and kids not so much.

Old 01-04-2021, 02:52 AM
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Before you commit to the N40, go to a TrawlerFest and look at that and other boats side by side. The N40 feels really small. Imagine servicing the engine (single?) in that.

I guess Alaska makes a pilot house mandatory. That said, when you are down south, a fly bridge is nice.

Don't mentally commit to the N40 purely based on surfing the web. 20 years ago, I was smitten with that boat too. I read Bebe's book. Had big dreams of crossing the Atlantic, etc. Then I started regularly going to TrawlerFests (probably did ten of them) and learned a lot about the different options out there. There are lots of nice boats that are very capable. You may even find a custom boat that is available and better built for rough water than a bigger Nordhavn.

Good luck.
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Old 01-04-2021, 03:39 AM
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fleming ,gb alutian would be must see before nordhaven , theres alot of choices
Old 01-04-2021, 03:56 AM
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I've been thinking about this type boat too. Great loop, Caribbean, Gulf and East Coast. Just a couple .Can't see a reason to go over 46'. Is there?
Old 01-04-2021, 04:38 AM
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There's a Blog on YouTube called MV Freedom, Its a couple on a 43 Nordhaven up in Seattle. But I'll bet you have already been following it. That would be my boat of choice, not cheap though.

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