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Offshore. Lightning everywhere. Stay still or haul ass?

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Offshore. Lightning everywhere. Stay still or haul ass?

Old 11-21-2020, 05:04 PM
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Originally Posted by ReelDreams1 View Post
I had the sailboat in the slip next to me get hit on the mast. We were on the boat at the time and it scared the crap out of us. I thought we were OK and after the storm left we left the boat and headed home. The next day the marina called me to say I had diesel fuel pumping out the bilge pump hose. We ran over and found the port tank (same side as the sailboat) was leaking fuel. Pulled the boat out and drained the fuel tank. When we got inside we found 7 holes along the outboard side of the tank and one large one in the bottom. This was one on the side of the tank.

this was in the bottom of the tank.


We had to pull the engine and replace the tank. There was not even a single mark where the lightening went through the fiberglass and into the tank. I think if it was a gas engine we would not be here to talk about it.
Old 11-21-2020, 05:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Lifeislarge View Post
fify

Give this man a beer
Old 11-21-2020, 05:14 PM
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Originally Posted by tdk72 View Post
Light travels at 186,000 miles per second
yes, LIGHT ( What we see as lightning) travels that fast but the energy charge or strike of the ACTUAL "bolt" travels around 270,000
Old 11-21-2020, 05:15 PM
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Old 11-21-2020, 10:19 PM
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With XM radio and a nice open array, we always try to run around the large summer pop up storms. Only once we were caught in a storm that grew larger in every direction than we could run. Lightening hitting the water all around us. We just hoped a bolt would not find us. I agree, best bet is to get out of the way. Problem is, what to do if there is no get out of the way? Haul ass? Stay Still? The data at that very moment will let you know and you need to make the best choice.
Old 11-22-2020, 05:24 AM
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A few times I tried to run back to fort pierce inlet to avoid a storm the storm came straight up the middle of the inlet. Do storms like to follow the inlet?
Old 11-22-2020, 05:29 AM
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Originally Posted by noelm View Post
explain "lightning proof"
Lightning = long stringy electrical thing up in the sky
Proof = don't worry about it you'll get back to the airport
Old 11-22-2020, 05:32 AM
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Originally Posted by 30West View Post
Years ago I was doing my walk-around of a month-old 737-800, found a couple long lines of holes patched up.
No prob. Patch GelCoat and get back on the line:

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Old 11-22-2020, 05:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Dave51 View Post
Doesn't apply. Planes are lightning proof so they fly into storms without concern.
Originally Posted by Jay4612 View Post
35 year airline pilot.....NOPE!
List of all airplanes brought down by lightning in last 35 years:


Old 11-22-2020, 05:50 AM
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Originally Posted by barrell View Post
A few times I tried to run back to fort pierce inlet to avoid a storm the storm came straight up the middle of the inlet. Do storms like to follow the inlet?
I have noticed this over many years and came up with a theory. I live directly in front of Saint Augustine inlet. In the summer there is always some sort of breeze at my house. Go 1 Mile north or south to visit a friend and their houses on the water have little to no wind at that moment. If their house is 10mph wind, my house is 15+. No beach to block it. So this ocean cooled air flowing faster hits inland hot air more in front of the inlet causing larger pop up strom's right in line with the inlet

I have no meteorology experience so this is all a very wild educated guess. But I agree, I see these storms track inlets more.




Old 11-22-2020, 06:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Captain Salt View Post
You know, that is actually an interesting theory which causes me to wonder how much lightening can alter it's course to attach itself to a thing - such as a boat on the water.
We all know that electricity like to go to ground and that a tall object is an easy mark. High tension towers get struck, cell towers, radio station antennas, water towers, windmills - they're all easy (high) targets.
Now, a boat may very well be the highest target around for miles and miles and a lightening bolt way want to strike it, but if the boat is moving fast enough, I wonder if the lightening that is heading down tot he earth's surface has much of an ability to turn towards a high object it wants to hit.

I'm no meteorologist or rocket surgeon but just wondering if anyone knows the answer.
There was a guy riding a motorcycle who was struck by lightning, so I don’t think it matters.


https://www.google.com/amp/s/abcnews...%3fid=63601529

Old 11-22-2020, 07:08 AM
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It senses fear. If you run, it’ll come for you.
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Old 11-22-2020, 07:24 AM
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radar-- avoid cells. If u cant travel in a direction that lets it pass by you as quickly as possible, end of story.
Old 11-22-2020, 11:18 AM
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According to NSSL, lighting can hit anywhere within 100 miles of the parent storm, so I suppose moving in any direction thay gets you farther away from the storm or front as quickly as possible would be the best idea in theory...until you run out of gas heading in the wrong direction.

Personally, lightning popping while on the water is the thing that I hate the most while boating, and I avoid it at all costs.
Old 11-22-2020, 12:01 PM
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I put a lightning protection system on the radar arch of a 46 PHMY. Guaranteed or your money back ($500.00) - it looked like a wire brush for cleaning chimneys inside a tube. Supposedly bled off negative electrons.
My BIL was a boat electronics installer and he just laughed.

It also hits jet skis as the rooster tail I think can attract a strike. I know of 2 separate incidents where that has happened on the ICW near Wrightsville Beach.
Old 11-22-2020, 01:11 PM
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Rooster tail will not "attract" lightning, there is so much myth around lightning, like people switching off power outlets in your house, do you think a small gap of about 1/4" provided when the switch is off is going to stop lightning? You don't "attract" lightning, it "discharges" on any object, it often hits points much lower than surrounding structure, lightning rods on buildings don't attract lightning, they just provide a safe path to ground, planes are not lightning proof, however they are constructed to not sustain fatal damage to equipment if struck, ships are built the same (well most are) a direct lightning strike is pretty damn "exciting" and often destroys what it hits, but lots of times it hits close by and causes only minor damage, but, you still think you were hit and survived.
Old 11-22-2020, 01:29 PM
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Our house got hit 7 years ago.

It blew the chimney off the roof, made a hole in the roof and everything electric was fried except for stuff that wasnt plugged in.

From the chimney it went looking for a ground, It folded up the garage door like a suitcase and found ground in the slab.

Took 5 months to get all the repairs done and we still have some weird gremlins every once in a while.

I dont **** around with lightning.
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Old 11-22-2020, 02:00 PM
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That's because it was a direct hit, not just a close by hit, or a hit in multiple places at once, it makes a big difference to damage.
Old 11-22-2020, 02:37 PM
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Originally Posted by noelm View Post
Rooster tail will not "attract" lightning, there is so much myth around lightning, like people switching off power outlets in your house, do you think a small gap of about 1/4" provided when the switch is off is going to stop lightning? You don't "attract" lightning, it "discharges" on any object, it often hits points much lower than surrounding structure, lightning rods on buildings don't attract lightning, they just provide a safe path to ground, planes are not lightning proof, however they are constructed to not sustain fatal damage to equipment if struck, ships are built the same (well most are) a direct lightning strike is pretty damn "exciting" and often destroys what it hits, but lots of times it hits close by and causes only minor damage, but, you still think you were hit and survived.
The rooster tail on yamaha jet skis can be 8' high and water is a good conductor.

I also heard lightning rods work by discharging the negative build up of electrons. Maybe that isn't correct?
Old 11-22-2020, 04:52 PM
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Originally Posted by captainmarknc View Post
The rooster tail on yamaha jet skis can be 8' high and water is a good conductor.

I also heard lightning rods work by discharging the negative build up of electrons. Maybe that isn't correct?
that is correct....it is incorrect, rooster tail will not, does not "attract" lightning, kind of makes you wonder about all these stories about lightning hitting the water near a boat, the boat is certainly higher than the water. Lightning rods provide a good electrical path to ground, that's the important bit, a good electrical conductor to ground will near eliminate damage, the problems occur when a bad path to ground is stuck, the high voltage and current blows things to bits trying to get to ground.

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