Go Back  The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum > BOATING FORUMS > The Boating Forum
Reload this Page >

Another example where the kill lanyard should have been used

Notices
The Boating Forum

Another example where the kill lanyard should have been used

Old 10-12-2020, 05:50 PM
  #21  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: SWFL
Posts: 346
Received 209 Likes on 120 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by frogbite View Post
Watched the YouTube video from Fell's on installing the unit. Looks super simple. In the video, the guy wired it directly to the kill switch, but looking on Amazon, they sell "FELL Marine Mob+ System Multiple Engine Harness". I have twin Zukes, I don't think I would need this if wiring at the kill switch right? I would just insert it at the pigtail where both engines hook in I think.
Depends on how the existing kill switch is set up. See the lower right explanation on this page: Suzuki_QuickGuide_Jan17-1.pdf

When I installed one on a boat with twin Merc sterndrives I didn't need anything additional and the job took less than an hour. On my WC w/twin Yami's, the dealer installed it for me as a courtesy. I just gave him the basic unit and I don't think he used anything else.

Maybe it'll be on sale on Amazon after midnight tonight!
Old 10-13-2020, 09:15 AM
  #22  
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 67
Received 43 Likes on 10 Posts
Default

My adult son and I wear the lanyard around our wrist on throttle hand at all times. We form a slip loop in it and is just second nature,never a problem. i would imagine hooking it to your torso would take more time and be more obtrusive.
Old 10-15-2020, 06:45 PM
  #23  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 9,739
Received 1,910 Likes on 1,092 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Sproly View Post
Not a fan at all of the traditional kill lanyard. For every life it saves you have 10 more instances of bad situations turning for the worse because of whoever is piloting the vessel jumping away from the helm to throw a flotation device or a loose one falling out and killing your engines in a situation where having power is the only thing keeping you upright. In the heat of the moment the last thing anyone is concerned with is checking the kill lanyard when trying to figure out why your engines died and won't start back up in the rush of a crisis situation.
Really?? Like joeballow, I'd love to know where those stats come from. There's enough stretch in mine to move half way down the cockpit without killing the engine and on the couple of occasions I have forgotten to disconnect it from myself (it soon becomes second nature if you wear it all the time), the 'ping' of it popping out makes it really obvious what has happened and I didn't for a moment quiz myself as to why the engine died and I don't believe I would in a crisis situation.

There have been many instances of fatal or life changing injuries due to not wearing a kill lanyard - is there any documented evidence that anyone has even been hurt due to accidentally killing an engine by forgetting they were hooked up to the kill switch? If I'm keeping the boat upright with power, I can't imagine for a moment that I would risk moving away from the helm - it's not just the power that keeps a boat on course in a bad sea, it's also the steering!!
Old 10-15-2020, 06:51 PM
  #24  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Northeast
Posts: 192
Received 59 Likes on 39 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by ZMAN617 View Post
I would like to know, who really uses a kill lanyard on a offshore boat over 25' long?
I don't nor can I recall any boat that I have been on where the captain wore one. Yes, I can see if the captain is going solo that makes sense. But, in reality, who wears one?
I wear my wireless MOB every time I go out. The thought of falling out of my boat fishing/trolling scares me to death. Given it is only a couple hundred dollars it is a no brainer to install one in my opinion.
Likes:
Old 10-15-2020, 06:58 PM
  #25  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: SWFL
Posts: 346
Received 209 Likes on 120 Posts
Default

If the skipper connected to the lanyard is the one thrown how does another crew member start the engines to maneuver for a rescue? If things are rough enough that the skipper takes a dive it may be very difficult to swim back to the boat. The MOB+ only kills the engines for 6 seconds before allowing a restart.
Old 10-15-2020, 07:02 PM
  #26  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Jupiter FL
Posts: 374
Received 29 Likes on 25 Posts
Default

According to our local news the captain of the boat was promptly arrested for dui. He blew a 1.3. Lanyards are fine and all boat don’t get shitfaced and run a boat.
Old 10-15-2020, 07:08 PM
  #27  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Dickinson, TX
Posts: 242
Received 78 Likes on 44 Posts
Default

Well its law in Texas
Old 10-16-2020, 06:52 AM
  #28  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Central Florida, East Coast
Posts: 462
Received 110 Likes on 75 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by brobin View Post
Depends on how the existing kill switch is set up. See the lower right explanation on this page: Attachment 1119810

When I installed one on a boat with twin Merc sterndrives I didn't need anything additional and the job took less than an hour. On my WC w/twin Yami's, the dealer installed it for me as a courtesy. I just gave him the basic unit and I don't think he used anything else.

Maybe it'll be on sale on Amazon after midnight tonight!
Thanks Brobin, I am going to purchase the device. Seems trivial since everything goes to the same place on the kill switch. Some configs may be more complex.
Old 10-16-2020, 06:57 AM
  #29  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Central Florida, East Coast
Posts: 462
Received 110 Likes on 75 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by brobin View Post
If the skipper connected to the lanyard is the one thrown how does another crew member start the engines to maneuver for a rescue? If things are rough enough that the skipper takes a dive it may be very difficult to swim back to the boat. The MOB+ only kills the engines for 6 seconds before allowing a restart.
This is another argument for using the electronic devices. The point though is that it is better to stop the motor than to let it keep running though. If the skipper is thrown, someone else may not be in position to take control before they are thrown, such as this example. I think the kill lanyard is better than nothing, but I am really liking the idea of these MOB devices that kill the motor.

When I use to fish bass tournaments, as you left the staging area you had to prove not only that it was connected to you, but that when you pulled it the engine cut off. Even if you had another system, the kill lanyard was still mandatory.
Old 10-16-2020, 06:59 AM
  #30  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: SWFL
Posts: 346
Received 209 Likes on 120 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by acassidy View Post
Well its law in Texas
Blowing a 1.3 or using a lanyard?
Likes:
Old 10-16-2020, 07:24 AM
  #31  
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Suburb of Sugar Tit SC
Posts: 14,990
Received 9,518 Likes on 5,165 Posts
Default

I added the Fell Marine MOB+ to my boat and love it. The only quirky thing on my Yamaha is that the unit must be powered up and the kill fob connected to the head unit prior to turning on the key to the motor. If not, it gives a kill switch error code and won't start. I do like that if the kill fob goes out of range and kills the motor it automatically bypasses and allows the engine to start without fiddling with it.
Old 10-16-2020, 07:29 AM
  #32  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: North Shore MA
Posts: 605
Received 81 Likes on 48 Posts
Default

I was tossed out of my boat when I was 17 due to catastrophic steering failure. Both hands cut up and I almost bled out. 35 years later I try to remember to wear all the time and insist everyone else does when they’re at the helm. Just remember to remove near the dock so you don’t kill engine working lines. Never a hassle
Old 10-16-2020, 07:37 AM
  #33  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: SWFL
Posts: 346
Received 209 Likes on 120 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
I added the Fell Marine MOB+ to my boat and love it. The only quirky thing on my Yamaha is that the unit must be powered up and the kill fob connected to the head unit prior to turning on the key to the motor. If not, it gives a kill switch error code and won't start. I do like that if the kill fob goes out of range and kills the motor it automatically bypasses and allows the engine to start without fiddling with it.
That's to ensure you've turned on the fob. When I turn the key and get the alarm I just press the button on the fob and I'm good to go.
Old 10-17-2020, 12:42 PM
  #34  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 9,739
Received 1,910 Likes on 1,092 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by brobin View Post
If the skipper connected to the lanyard is the one thrown how does another crew member start the engines to maneuver for a rescue? If things are rough enough that the skipper takes a dive it may be very difficult to swim back to the boat. The MOB+ only kills the engines for 6 seconds before allowing a restart.
I can’t speak for all makes, but Mercury, Evrinrude and Honda all have facilities to quickly retstart without the kill cord for just such a situation (Merc and Evinrude really easily, Honda a little more fiddly) if your engine doesn’t have this ability, just hang a spare near the kill switch.
Old 10-17-2020, 01:22 PM
  #35  
Senior Member Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Lighthouse Point, Fl.
Posts: 2,586
Received 765 Likes on 377 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by ZMAN617 View Post
I would like to know, who really uses a kill lanyard on a offshore boat over 25' long?
I don't nor can I recall any boat that I have been on where the captain wore one. Yes, I can see if the captain is going solo that makes sense. But, in reality, who wears one?
Get thrown out of a fast moving boat one time and I doubt you will ever forget the experience. In my case it was over 40 years ago and long story short I was lucky that for some reason the motor quit and I was able to swim to it.
Fell's is a sponsor here and during my installation of their wireless I found their email tech support GREAT. It was early in its development and when my major issue appeared they redesigned the system for my twin's which greatly simplified the installation.
There is however one scenario I thought about where a wireless kill would basically be useless as opposed to where a wired would save you. And yes you could install wireless and still have the wired. Of course in that scenario a lightning bolt would probably due in your sorry *ss. You're alone and get thrown from the helm and get knocked out from say a head injury as you land say in the stern of the boat. Since the FOB is still within the short distance to the control unit, and not in the water its signal is not broken so the motors don't shut down.
Old 10-17-2020, 01:30 PM
  #36  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 232
Received 113 Likes on 68 Posts
Default

I always wear the lanyard as well as a PFD. Water here is cold and I won’t be able to catch up swimming to the boat even in idle...
Old 10-17-2020, 05:12 PM
  #37  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Pensacola, Fl
Posts: 12,290
Received 613 Likes on 448 Posts
Default

Alabama has the law that the kill switch lanyard must be worn in an open boat less than 24' and an outboard of greater than 50 HP. I have also seen several dinghies where the solo person aboard was thrown out--and no kill lanyard attached; the boat circled until it was corralled or the engine stopped by a piece of floating line.
Old 10-17-2020, 05:29 PM
  #38  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Pompano Beach, FL
Posts: 562
Received 98 Likes on 56 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by ZMAN617 View Post
I would like to know, who really uses a kill lanyard on a offshore boat over 25' long?
I don't nor can I recall any boat that I have been on where the captain wore one. Yes, I can see if the captain is going solo that makes sense. But, in reality, who wears one?

I wear a wireless Fell Marine lanyard 100% of the time I’m offshore, especially now since fishing solo w COVID. Truth be told though, if wireless lanyards did not exist there is no way I could wear one.

Twice
Old 10-17-2020, 06:49 PM
  #39  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Holland, Michigan
Posts: 1,980
Received 492 Likes on 296 Posts
Default

I looked at the wiring guide, can the FELL work on an old twin inboard gasser with two stations? Maybe cut power to the coils? Seems like a good price for what it can prevent.
Old 10-17-2020, 07:59 PM
  #40  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 327
Received 91 Likes on 60 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Sproly View Post
Not a fan at all of the traditional kill lanyard. For every life it saves you have 10 more instances of bad situations turning for the worse because of whoever is piloting the vessel jumping away from the helm to throw a flotation device or a loose one falling out and killing your engines in a situation where having power is the only thing keeping you upright. In the heat of the moment the last thing anyone is concerned with is checking the kill lanyard when trying to figure out why your engines died and won't start back up in the rush of a crisis situation.
I wear it when alone with the kids.

But yeah I sometimes forget and kill the engine. Then once I forgot to put it back. Next day the new-this-season engine won’t start. My wife is shaking her head citing the amount of money I spent on it. Took a couple minutes but I finally remembered.

Seems like the engine should beep or alarm if you try to start without it..

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.