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Jacking Up Trailer + Boat

Old 10-12-2020, 09:59 AM
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Default Jacking Up Trailer + Boat

Right up front, please forgive my ignorance with these questions. I only recently learned that I should be jacking the trailer wheels off the ground during winter storage. And trying to avoid any disastersThe BIG RED Torin Steel Jack Stands look good, but the support saddle is only 3 wide, which means my trailer i-beam will not sit inside that, but will be resting on top. I feel that if its resting on top, it could easily slide off, particularly when Im jacking up the other side of the trailer. Is this a valid concern, and how do I get around that?

The weight of the motor counterbalances the tongue weight. With that said, where should I place the jack stands? Front of the front axle, rear of the rear axle, or try somehow to place it in between both axles?

My tongue jack is rated for 1200 lbs. The boat and trailer come in at just under 6000 lbs. Assuming most of the weight is usually off the tongue because of the counterbalancing, do I need to also get a jack stand for the tongue, or would the trailer tongue jack suffice?

Could I put plywood under the jack wheels when lifting so the wheels dont bury themselves into the recently re-paved blacktop

Lastly, when jacking up the trailer, where is the preferred place to put the jack pad? On one of the axles, or on the i-beam?

Thanks so much!!!
Old 10-12-2020, 10:13 AM
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Jack stand under the axle behind each wheel, and a chunk of 2x6 under the tongue jack wheel to protect asphalt.
Old 10-12-2020, 10:18 AM
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Ive never jacked up the wheels and Ive not had any ill affects. However if you do want to do it, be wary of the front of the trailer - it wont take the shift of the weight ( I have jacked up a trailer and boat, just not to save the tires) so make sure its well supported.
i would also borrow a person and another jack and lift both sides at the same time.
but TBH, Id rather risk a tire than jacking up the boat and trailer.

Last edited by Clinker; 10-12-2020 at 11:48 AM.
Old 10-12-2020, 10:26 AM
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I put 14"X14" pavers down and put the trailer on that. It keeps the tires off the wet ground. I've never had a tire problem but I don't tow often.
Old 10-12-2020, 10:29 AM
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I don't jack mine up - just move it a few times over the winter
Old 10-12-2020, 10:38 AM
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I jack up trailer with boat on it. I remove wheels for storage. I put cinder blocks under frame behind where wheels were. I slant boat to one side by very little to help drainage.
Old 10-12-2020, 10:46 AM
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Do NOT jack it up under the axles.
SOME axles are hollow and will crush, and if torsion-axles will ruin the suspension.
On non-torsion, the leafsprings will no relax if jacked (if you care about that.)

Jack a trailer by placing the Jacks under the FRAME immediately/directly aft of the axles.
Old 10-12-2020, 11:41 AM
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I don't lift mine... I roll all trailers on planks (desired length and width to accommodate for wheels) and cover them for winter.

Just a thought if I needed to jack the whole thing up - would lowering the tongue all the way, supporting the rear on both sides where the strength points are, and than jacking the front (with appropriate jack, no the traditional one) work? Once the front comes up this way, the back won't have where to go lower, so the whole thing will lift up, with the back end SUPPORTED and BALANCED. Reverse steps to bring down...

(Disclaimer for everyone out there - I'm not recommending this, just do at your own risk if decide to.)
Old 10-12-2020, 12:03 PM
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Never tried to lift the trailer during winter storage in all my years up there.

We used to square off a few tree trunks (just like those before you split them for firewood) and stack them under the hull to take the weight off the trailer. Same style the yard would use to block your boat on hard.

Lower the tongue way down and stack up under the transom just before/until contact. Raise the tongue way up and place mid-hull and bow stacks until just to the hull. When you lower the trailer back to normal +90% of the weight was off the trailer. It would still sit on the trailer with the strakes resting on the bunks but almost all the weight was on the blocks right down the spine of the hull.
Old 10-12-2020, 12:21 PM
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This is more of a problem with the small high pressure tires that used to be common on boat trailers. As long as they are a modern tire, and you are only storing for the season (not multiple years), you do not need jack it up.
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Old 10-12-2020, 12:27 PM
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Don't store my boats on the trailers but I never jack it up.
Old 10-12-2020, 12:58 PM
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When jacking up my trailer I almost always jack it up on the axle tube just inside of the leaf spring.

I have a single axle leaf sprung set up. For winter storage I would place the jacks directly outboard of the leaf spring after the wheel was off.

The axle and leaf springs are designed to hold this weight. This would mean that you would need 4 jack stands for a dual axle trailer.

If you have a torsion axle trailer I don't know what to tell you.

I have also used jack stands on the frame when replacing the axle. But, that was not long term storage.

I had both tires break belts over the winter last year. I'll be taking them off this year.
Old 10-12-2020, 01:09 PM
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Raise the trailer tongue a couple of cranks and put a jack stand under it. Lower until it makes solid contact. With a floor or bottle jack and a short length of 2x6 on top, jack the frame either just behind the wheel (single axle) or between the wheels (tandem) until the wheel is just off the ground. Use wood blocks under the frame just aft of the wheels and lower onto them after removing the wheel. Or use enough heavy blocking that you can leave the wheels on. You can then level the trailer or give it a slight rearward pitch using the tongue jack and then adjust the jack stand accordingly. Doesn't hurt to leave the jack stand or blocking under the tongue.
Old 10-12-2020, 01:26 PM
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I always use concrete blocks and 2x8's and sometime 4/4's to take up any space. On my trailer I put them under the last cross member near the I-beam.
Lower your front jack all the way. Put whatever you're going to use aft of the rear axle. On the cross member or I-beam.
Raise the jack until weight is removed from the axles.
Support the front of the trailer with something.
Old 10-12-2020, 01:38 PM
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WARNING: Concrete Blocks are not designed for this. They can suddenly shatter to dust and drop whatever ON you!
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Old 10-12-2020, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Fishinado View Post
Do NOT jack it up under the axles.
SOME axles are hollow and will crush, and if torsion-axles will ruin the suspension.
On non-torsion, the leafsprings will no relax if jacked (if you care about that.)

Jack a trailer by placing the Jacks under the FRAME immediately/directly aft of the axles.
If you have axles on your trailer that will crush you may need a new trailer.
Old 10-12-2020, 02:05 PM
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I grew up on a farm. We had dozens of pieces of farm equipment that sat all winter. I'm sure it was at least 75 different tires, maybe over 100 tires. I don't ever remember any damage from tires sitting all winter. My trailer just sits on the ground.
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Old 10-12-2020, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by BuffsBoat View Post
Right up front, please forgive my ignorance with these questions. I only recently learned that I should be jacking the trailer wheels off the ground during winter storage. And trying to avoid any disastersThe BIG RED Torin Steel Jack Stands look good, but the support saddle is only 3 wide, which means my trailer i-beam will not sit inside that, but will be resting on top. I feel that if its resting on top, it could easily slide off, particularly when Im jacking up the other side of the trailer. Is this a valid concern, and how do I get around that?

The weight of the motor counterbalances the tongue weight. With that said, where should I place the jack stands? Front of the front axle, rear of the rear axle, or try somehow to place it in between both axles?

My tongue jack is rated for 1200 lbs. The boat and trailer come in at just under 6000 lbs. Assuming most of the weight is usually off the tongue because of the counterbalancing, do I need to also get a jack stand for the tongue, or would the trailer tongue jack suffice?

Could I put plywood under the jack wheels when lifting so the wheels dont bury themselves into the recently re-paved blacktop

Lastly, when jacking up the trailer, where is the preferred place to put the jack pad? On one of the axles, or on the i-beam?

Thanks so much!!!
Who told you that jacking up the trailer was a good idea.
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Old 10-12-2020, 02:26 PM
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I have a couple cars and trailers that sit unused all winter, the local tire dealer told me to just over inflate tires for winter storage, which i do.
I have done this for years with no ill effects.
Old 10-12-2020, 03:44 PM
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I have stored my 21 foot boats on the trailer for 30 years - no blocks, no over inflation, no problems - ever. But knock yourself out.

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