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Viking Convertible 45' or 60'

Old 10-05-2020, 11:24 AM
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Default Viking Convertible 45' or 60'

I am in the market for a Viking Convertible ranging from 45'-60'. I recently sold my 28' Pursuit CC and I'm looking to move up. My price range is $300-500k which means I can get a newer 45 or 48 vs a 54 or 60. I know there are advantages to both, fuel, space etc. I am looking for any advice from other experienced owners in what route they may go and why? I am leaning towards getting a newer 45 or 48, keeping for a few years and then deciding if I want to move up. Any advice would be appreciated.

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10-06-2020, 05:18 PM
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mwolf3030--you'll be surprised what will happen once you get serious about a purchase. In 2016, I spent over a year, nearly $20k in travel expenses, and three surveys before I found the right boat. I was looking in the 40-45 range and while walking the docks in St Augustine I came across an '88 55 Hatteras that was IMMACULATE and MASSIVE with a "for sale by owner" sign on it. I called him up and he told me to help myself to the bridge and cockpit, he would be there shortly. An hour later I had a survey scheduled for the next morning which revealed exactly what I suspected, a ridiculously maintained battle wagon. The asking price was about $40k over my budget but I am pretty mechanically inclined so I knew I would be doing all the maintenance and have no issues with diving the bottom and cleaning it myself so those financial requirements were accounted for. I made an offer for $130k (with a budget of $150k and asking price of $189k) and the seller jumped on it without hesitation. I returned home, completed all the necessary logistics and planned to return to the boat for a week long prep to run her north to Wilmington, NC. The day we pulled out of the slip I had 0 seat time in a boat this size, but it didn't matter. I was patient, confident, and super stoked with my purchase, and what a better way to get to know her then to run her 600 miles to her home port. Three years later I don't regret my purchase one bit, as a matter of fact, I would do it all over again without hesitation. BEATs Therapy has detroit 12-71 diesels @ 900hp each and burns 78gph at 20 knots BUT I cruise 20 knots in lake like conditions or 5-6 footers, she's a beast. Have fun with the process and good luck
Old 10-05-2020, 11:41 AM
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I haven’t owned either boat. Our family owned a boatyard for many years in Freeport, Texas. The expense of operating and maintaining boats the size that you are looking at is not linear but, is exponential. I don’t know how much maintenance that you plan to do personally but a 46-48’ is large enough to get all of the equipment mounted in the engine room where you can actually work on it. Fuel is not currently a big issue but a 60’ burns quite a bit more than a 46’ boat. It takes about 2x the horsepower to push a 60 footer. If you aren’t running very far to fish that may not be an issue. A 60’ will give you an extra stateroom if you need it.
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Old 10-05-2020, 11:52 AM
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Depends on what you want to do with the boat. If you're going to run the boat yourself, I'd stay on the smaller side of your range and work up from there.
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Old 10-05-2020, 11:54 AM
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Originally Posted by mwolf3030 View Post
I am in the market for a Viking Convertible ranging from 45'-60'. I recently sold my 28' Pursuit CC and I'm looking to move up. My price range is $300-500k which means I can get a newer 45 or 48 vs a 54 or 60. I know there are advantages to both, fuel, space etc. I am looking for any advice from other experienced owners in what route they may go and why? I am leaning towards getting a newer 45 or 48, keeping for a few years and then deciding if I want to move up. Any advice would be appreciated.
Have you factored in annual maintenance costs? My buddy has a 54, I think he spends $50k per year on average for maintenance, slip, fuel, insurance, winterization, etc.
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Old 10-05-2020, 02:18 PM
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Unless it's the deal of the century it's going to be very, very difficult to find a 54' or 60' even remotely close to $500k. In that size range to stay within budget you'd be looking at an early 2000's 55' convertible as the best bet.

An early-mid 2000's 45' or 48' convertible is doable in the $300-500k range and is probably a better first step out of a 28' center console to see how you like the convertible and get comfortable running one. A 55' would be a big jump to a lot of boat unless you've got a lot of helm time on 50-60'ers.

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Old 10-05-2020, 02:40 PM
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first post?
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Old 10-05-2020, 02:40 PM
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If your budget is 300-500 then I would suggest staying away from the larger boat. A 60’ could easily hit you for 60k a year . And any 1 year might be the Big Bang year. And there goes a $100k. I have been on the receiving end. Not bad for me , very bad for you.
Old 10-05-2020, 03:29 PM
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he's jumping from a 28 to a 45-60 footer. seems appropriate.
Old 10-05-2020, 03:37 PM
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Originally Posted by dsharp View Post
I haven’t owned either boat. Our family owned a boatyard for many years in Freeport, Texas. The expense of operating and maintaining boats the size that you are looking at is not linear but, is exponential. I don’t know how much maintenance that you plan to do personally but a 46-48’ is large enough to get all of the equipment mounted in the engine room where you can actually work on it. Fuel is not currently a big issue but a 60’ burns quite a bit more than a 46’ boat. It takes about 2x the horsepower to push a 60 footer. If you aren’t running very far to fish that may not be an issue. A 60’ will give you an extra stateroom if you need it.
Thanks for the info. Unfortunately I am in the Orange Beach, AL area and our run out is 50-80 + miles to the drop and rigs. It will be used for a place to stay overnight for 2-4 people typically (no more than 2 straight nights) Definitely understand about the maintenance and I am factoring at least 10% of the purchase price in maintenance annually.
Old 10-05-2020, 03:38 PM
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I have factored approximately 10% of the purchase price annually in maintenance cost.
Old 10-05-2020, 03:56 PM
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The 10% figure of purchase price for maintenance is a realistic number. Normally some years less and some more but as an average that's fairly accurate. If your mechanically inclined and have the time to do some of the maintenance it can reduce some of your costs. Agree with starting with 45-50' for a few years before moving up. It would be an expensive mistake to jump up to 55-60 and find out its not your cup of tea. Did you keep your Pursuit at a marina, trailer or at house in the water? As an estimate 10% of value for insurance.
Old 10-05-2020, 03:56 PM
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Seems like you have your finances in order . Now for the fun factor. Running a 40 something may be more enjoyable the a 60’ bigger isn’t always better. Small boat . Small crew , easier handling, . You might actually use the small boat more then the big boat. And as far as weather is concerned, if I can’t do it in a 40’ I’m just not going period. I have seen many a boat owner overstep their expectation. Get the best and smallest boat that will do the job. You will never regret it. Buying a large 60’ can be overwhelming.
Old 10-05-2020, 05:29 PM
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Originally Posted by mwolf3030 View Post
I have factored approximately 10% of the purchase price annually in maintenance cost.
You need to figure 10% of the cost of the boat new. They don’t get cheaper to maintain as they get older.
Old 10-05-2020, 05:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Phins360 View Post
he's jumping from a 28 to a 45-60 footer. seems appropriate.
most insurance companies and lenders won't let that happen. hard enough to go from 30 to 40 feet
Old 10-05-2020, 06:23 PM
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Originally Posted by mystery View Post
most insurance companies and lenders won't let that happen. hard enough to go from 30 to 40 feet
Don’t derail, he didn’t ask about lenders or insurance
Old 10-05-2020, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by mystery View Post
most insurance companies and lenders won't let that happen. hard enough to go from 30 to 40 feet
nonsense, just pay the bill
Old 10-05-2020, 06:40 PM
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Originally Posted by fireisland1 View Post
nonsense, just pay the bill
Some have issues with more than 5 foot jump but most have issues with 10+ foot jump when you get into the 40+ foot range.
Old 10-05-2020, 07:19 PM
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Id get the 40'. It took me about 12 trips and lots of practice docking to get used to jumping from a 27 to a 32 with no wind. When its blowing 15 you better know wtf youre doing.
The beam gives you no room for error when docking. 15' vs the 9' you were used to is a massive difference.
The boat responds slower due to the inertia of all that weight.
Then there are all the systems to learn.
Not much difference in a 40 and 60 system wise but a learning curve coming from a cc. The 60 motors will be big boys with big bills and massive fuel consumption.
A 60 is more than I would want to run solo.
Did I mention the draft?
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Old 10-05-2020, 07:33 PM
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Mystery has a very valid point. If original poster is looking for advice on size of vessel to buy he needs to be aware that jumping up in size has :hidden" costs he may not be aware of- such as an Insurer requiring a Full Time captain on a 60' boat.
Old 10-05-2020, 08:22 PM
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Another first time post on a topic sure to provoke a healthy amount of debate, so I suppose no harm even if the question is in fact hypothetical trolling.

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