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Calling THT marine electricians... butt connected outlet install

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Calling THT marine electricians... butt connected outlet install

Old 08-03-2020, 08:24 PM
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Default Calling THT marine electricians... butt connected outlet install

I am very hands on but I dont mess with AC electrical stuff on my boat, not that I cant do some stuff, I just rather transfer the risk/liability onto a third party

Any ways, I hired a marine electrician, top dollar $$/hr, to install a couple outlets. I am inspecting his work and noticed he used butt connectors on one of them in the middle of the engine room. I recall him saying he didnt have enough materials and thats why he had to come back to finish the job but didnt realize he was a few feet short of where the wire needed to go into my electrical room, which is on the other side of the engine room.

The engine room is subject to a crazy environment between heat, salt air, humidity, etc. I dont feel good about the butt connectors but want to know if that is normal / fine in the long run? I recall in houses, these types of connections must be made in an enclosed junction box?

Thanks in advance!
Old 08-03-2020, 08:33 PM
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Properly sized, crimped, soldered, sealed and secured, no problemo.
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Old 08-03-2020, 08:36 PM
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Did you do a search on butt connectors?

He probably gave you shoddy work, ripped you off and now your boat is gonna burn to the ground.
Make him come back and do it right?
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Old 08-04-2020, 05:48 AM
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Originally Posted by alloyboy View Post
Properly sized, crimped, soldered, sealed and secured, no problemo.
Will it be obvious if it was soldered? I will ask but rather confirm myself. Thank you
Old 08-04-2020, 06:19 AM
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There should be no solder connections anywhere on a boat

Butt connections where you mentioned aren't terrible, but a continuous run would be better
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Old 08-04-2020, 06:29 AM
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Originally Posted by hotwire_marine View Post
There should be no solder connections anywhere on a boat

Butt connections where you mentioned aren't terrible, but a continuous run would be better
all my battery cables are soldered i believe... as are my antenna wires/connectors... never heard solder is bad on a boat...

i guess what i am getting at, if i am paying top $$/hr, would it be expected for someone to have done a continuous run and if they were a few feet short, gone and gotten the right length wire? i have never had any AC electrical work done and had a wire hacked together to extend a few feet, at least to my knowledge. there will be a big continuous electrical load on this wire in particular.
Old 08-04-2020, 06:35 AM
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The only thing soldered would be the vhf antenna connection. Battery cables shouldn’t be. Solder on a boat is very prone to corrosion and vibration.

if you are unhappy with the butt connectors make the guy come back and change them or find someone else?
Old 08-04-2020, 06:39 AM
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Originally Posted by hotwire_marine View Post
There should be no solder connections anywhere on a boat
ABYC E-11 AC and DC ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS ON BOATS

Name:  ABYC-11-16-3-7-Solder-anno.png
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Old 08-04-2020, 06:52 AM
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Originally Posted by hotwire_marine View Post
The only thing soldered would be the vhf antenna connection. Battery cables shouldn’t be. Solder on a boat is very prone to corrosion and vibration.

if you are unhappy with the butt connectors make the guy come back and change them or find someone else?
Mercury Marine and Yamaha say to solder battery cables.
Old 08-04-2020, 06:53 AM
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Originally Posted by hotwire_marine View Post
The only thing soldered would be the vhf antenna connection. Battery cables shouldn’t be. Solder on a boat is very prone to corrosion and vibration.

if you are unhappy with the butt connectors make the guy come back and change them or find someone else?
Possibility of corrosion is mitigated by sealing the connection. Vibration is mitigated by properly securing the wires from movement.
Old 08-04-2020, 07:07 AM
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Why is the difference between only soldered and also soldered so hard to understand?


Don't only solder to make a connection on a boat.
Old 08-04-2020, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Texas 17 View Post
Why is the difference between only soldered and also soldered so hard to understand?

Don't only solder to make a connection on a boat.
My belief is that folks that can't solder (don't know how and/or are not willing to learn) have a bad experience with solder. They then are prone to tell others that soldering should not be done. If they can't do it then others should not even consider doing it.

By the same token, folks with crappy fuel quantity indication systems are quick to tell others that nothing can be done. They are all crappy so don't use them. They like to curse the darkness. Even though the light switch is right by them.
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Old 08-04-2020, 07:24 AM
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I thought any 115/240 connections had to be boxed. You cannot just butt connect 115/240v wires. I'm not an electrician but I thought one told me this.
Old 08-04-2020, 07:30 AM
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I thought quality heat shrink butt connectors were THE go to connection on a boat. At least that's what the books I've read (12 volt bible) say.

I don't deal with AC on my boat so maybe that's different.
Old 08-04-2020, 07:37 AM
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I also don't like it but I think it's common. When I rewired my boat there was a hidden butt splice on the wire from the battery to the selector switch and it was corroded (I was having intermittent issues which could have been any connection they all looked nasty ). I made sure to replace with continuous wire no splices anywhere I always try to minimize the number of connections.
Old 08-04-2020, 07:39 AM
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Originally Posted by mystery View Post
I am very hands on but I dont mess with AC electrical stuff on my boat...

Any ways, I hired a marine electrician, top dollar $$/hr, to install a couple outlets. I am inspecting his work and noticed he used butt connectors on one of them in the middle of the engine room.
According to ABYC E-8.15, all AC connections must be in appropriate weatherproof enclosures, rated to UL 514C, mounted to minimize moisture intrusion.
Old 08-04-2020, 07:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Texas 17 View Post
Don't only solder to make a connection on a boat.
Name:  E-11-solder-exception.png
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Old 08-04-2020, 07:46 AM
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Originally Posted by mystery View Post
Any ways, I hired a marine electrician, top dollar $$/hr, to install a couple outlets. I am inspecting his work and noticed he used butt connectors on one of them in the middle of the engine room... he was a few feet short of where the wire needed to go into my electrical room, which is on the other side of the engine room.
Note that ABYC E8.17 requires AC receptacles mounted in machinery space to have GFCI protection.

There are not ignition protected GFCI receptacles (to my knowledge), so that protection should be provided outside the ignition protection environment.
Old 08-04-2020, 07:54 AM
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Is a spliced wire the same as a wire connection in ABYC's eyes?

Let's not forget that ABYC is just a recommendation. Not mandatory.
Old 08-04-2020, 08:56 AM
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I Use a LOT of heat shrink butt connectors, However occasionally situations arise where soldering seems to be more appropriate (different wire gauges or maybe a 2 into 1 joint) In that case I will use heat shrink over the solder joint and if it in a location subject to getting constantly wet seal the ends of the heat shrink tube with liquid neoprene (liquid electrical tape). if done properly it makes for a real solid wire joint that will last as long as the wire.

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