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Aluminum offshore boat?

Old 06-09-2020, 08:16 AM
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Default Aluminum offshore boat?

I have started to like the simplicity of some of the aluminum offshore boats. I have had to pretty boats, the bell and whistle boat, etc. None of those were what I would say is a lifetime boat, and I don't care how pretty it is, it will not catch bigger or more fish than an ugly boat. All that said, can anybody speak to the ride quality of an offshore aluminum boat? Seems to me that if you want a plain Jane lifetime boat this may be the way to go. Any input is appreciated.
Old 06-09-2020, 08:42 AM
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The ride quality depends on the shape of the hull more than on the material. One can certainly build a nice hull out of aluminum. West Coast is full of aluminum boats. Aussies and Kiwis love them as well.

As everything, aluminum has its advantages and disadvantages. Compared to 'glass, aluminum hulls are tougher and require less maintenance. They have their own set of vulnerabilities, though -- leave one in a marina which is careless about electricity and your hull might dissolve in a matter of weeks. Aluminum can also get very hot (and very cold) and is generally noisier than 'glass. It's also more expensive because a good welder earns quite a bit more money than a guy who unrolls and wets out fiberglass.

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Old 06-09-2020, 03:56 PM
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Default aluminum boat

Check aluminumalloyboats.com
Old 06-09-2020, 04:17 PM
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Aluminium boats are often first choice here for offshore fishing. I have a 25fter that will ride as well as all but the heaviest glass equivalents. Ally boats can be lighter than glass boats and often don't have running strakes. Means the hull designs are different. High deadrise angle and fine entry are common on good heavy weather ally hulls. Also heavy plate thickness on the bottom. This design can make them feel a bit tender in sizes under 25ft or so. Under 20ft i don't like it. Hulls that carry their beam well forward and have big 'shoulders' may ride harder in big seas.

Comments above about insulation and being careful about electrical protection are true, but easily manageable.
Old 06-09-2020, 04:18 PM
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What coast you on?
that kind of makes the decision or at least
makes it more expensive.
east coast not a whole lot of options.
pacific/black lab used to be available
some used still come up. Pretty good riding
hulls, not amazing though very well made though.
sound marine in NY custom welds rock salt hulls I think.
they are pretty bad ass.
gulf coast has some very good builders,
razorhead, and metal shark.
all the other high quality builders are in
the northwest there are a ton of them.
you are going to find it hard to find a hull
design in aluminum to perform as well as
aLot of the big name deep vee Companies.
seevee, contender, etc.
not to say there isn’t some out there
or another design that could work for you
personally I’m obsessed with aluminum
something like alumacat!
aluminumalloyboats is a good resource
not super active though
but there are some very knowledgeable guys
on there.
good luck
Old 06-09-2020, 04:21 PM
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Gulfcraft, there is no substitute
Old 06-09-2020, 04:28 PM
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Sorry it’s lumacat


Old 06-09-2020, 04:49 PM
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.

Last edited by 500000KV; 06-10-2020 at 02:37 AM.
Old 06-09-2020, 04:59 PM
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Alabama gulf coast area on the Gulf of MEXICO. Most likely in the 24 foot range. Single outboard power center console.
Old 06-09-2020, 07:06 PM
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There are plenty of examples of what you are talking about to be found in Louisiana. Metal shark, Gaudet, American, scully,etc to name just a few. I personally own a Gaudet so can speak to some of the differences between fiberglass and aluminum.
Pro’s
most of these guys build bullet proof boats and are extremely durable
you can blast, paint, re power and have a brand new boat
ride depends on the shape of the hull but they do tend to be louder when running in seas
weight... most will build whatever you want but mine has heavier plate which allows for more weight and a better ride
if you want to change something all it takes is a welding machine

con’s
every dissimilar metal has to be insulated
if the metal isn’t prepped right paint can be an issue
louder in waves
less storage in the hull due to all the ribbing
in deck insulated boxes can be a big problem... fiberglass and insulating it can be done but needs to be done right

let me know if you have any specific questions


Old 06-09-2020, 07:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Drako View Post
The ride quality depends on the shape of the hull more than on the material. One can certainly build a nice hull out of aluminum. West Coast is full of aluminum boats. Aussies and Kiwis love them as well.

As everything, aluminum has its advantages and disadvantages. Compared to 'glass, aluminum hulls are tougher and require less maintenance. They have their own set of vulnerabilities, though -- leave one in a marina which is careless about electricity and your hull might dissolve in a matter of weeks. Aluminum can also get very hot (and very cold) and is generally noisier than 'glass. It's also more expensive because a good welder earns quite a bit more money than a guy who unrolls and wets out fiberglass.
Originally Posted by 500000KV View Post
west coast has a lot of manufacturers, from full custom to more of some big names manufacturers (Duckworth, NorthRiver, Boulton, Kingfisher)
How big are you looking for?
here’s our families Kingfisher 2825 offshore. Twin Merc 200’s, 15hp kicker, with dual stations. Ours rides well with upgraded suspension seats up front. Factory ones left something to be desired. We love it. Go for tuna or fish inshore, works for what we do.


Unfortunately, almost none of them have a hull design to provide a good ride in lumpy water. Virtually all the aluminum boats up in the PNW are 18-21 degree deadrise boats with the helm way forward in the front 1/3rd of the boat.The lumacat might be it.
Old 06-09-2020, 07:28 PM
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Look up offshore tinnys, crazy Australians take their 14 footers out many miles from shore. I can attest a 16 foot Lund SSV will handle some decent swells and chop for some good inshore fishing about 1-2 miles out, and they're basically among the simplest boats you can buy and operate. I really wish I had one honestly, but since I live near and fish freshwater I went with a smaller option.
Old 06-09-2020, 07:29 PM
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Metal Shark, Gaudet's, or an old Gravois hull could be what you are looking for.

I think you may suffer sticker shock if you haven't priced these hulls.
Old 06-09-2020, 08:00 PM
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Long Beach customs in Long Beach ms
Old 06-10-2020, 09:37 AM
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I ran the Lumacat for the season before it went up to Alaska. Great boat. Builders make aluminum tanks. We often joked about testing the durability by running over a derelict glass boat just for fun . Biggest concern was harming the lower units, not our hull.

We have plenty of very comfortable aluminum boats out here. Guys prefer the forward helm to open up the rear cockpit. No reason you couldn’t move the helm back and shrink the size of the pilot house, or make a cc instead of a pilot house. Great thing about aluminum is there aren’t “molds”. Lots of ways to customize the boat in the way YOU want to use it.

ACI, Allied Boats, Coldwater, and Northriver are quality builders out here. Croziercraft is a 1 at a time guy that does some great utilitarian builds too.

yes, proper bottom paint and anodes are important of wet slipped. For a trailer boat, not really an issue.

they can be noisier. Closed cell foam above the waterline takes care of that. I got way less thud and shuttering in the Lumacat than with my WorldCat. Solid as could be.

We have thousands of boats in eastern WA and OR where summer temps exceed 100°f. I had one over there too. Never felt the “hot” that folks refer too. If worried, seadek or like flooring takes care of that.

pros: drop 18# downrigger balls on the deck and don’t worry. Gaff the side and don’t worry. Hit the dock and don’t worry. Miss thumping a fish and hit the deck, don’t worry. Spider cracks don’t happen. We rarely wax/buff them. That was tough to get used too, coming from nice shiny glass boats. Easier cleanup.

cons: if poorly designed, the ride could suck. Not as “pretty” and curvy as glass boats. Can be loud in choppy conditions. Can get corrosion between dissimilar metals and under paint (many of us don’t paint). Need a smart builder for designing properly insulated fish boxes. We use commercial 1/2 totes in ours. (Cheap and amazing).
Old 06-10-2020, 03:08 PM
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If you are in Lower Alabama, my first stop would be to see Silver Ships. They are on Bellingrath Rd in Theodore.

Build boats for commercial, military, law enforcement, & recreational applications for clients all over the world.
Theodore, AL 36582

https://www.silverships.com/


Old 06-10-2020, 04:22 PM
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https://www.one3powerboats.com/

If I could I would.
Old 06-10-2020, 04:51 PM
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I looked at the One3 boat. That’s actually what started this whole thread. Looking good so far. I’m mostly concerned that the ride isn’t something weird that I haven’t heard about. I never used the fish boxes on my old boat but a few times, used a big K2 cooler most of the time. I also like the idea of sealed bulkheads instead of foam. It seems like some water will get in the foam some how more times than not on most boats. I know they run a lot of them down in Louisiana, I just have never been on one. Not sure if it’s a good idea or not but sure sounds like there is a lot of upside to them.
Old 06-10-2020, 04:52 PM
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Slam dancer, thanks for the heads up, I will check them out.

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