Go Back  The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum > BOATING FORUMS > The Boating Forum
Reload this Page >

Accident that could have gone very bad!

Notices
The Boating Forum

Accident that could have gone very bad!

Old 01-14-2020, 06:01 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: East Texas
Posts: 118
Received 37 Likes on 28 Posts
Default Accident that could have gone very bad!

I am sharing this post from Crappie.com, member Yaker:

I witnessed a man fall backwards out of his boat today,if it hadn’t been for his partner finally getting the motor shut off things could have been worse.The fellow who fell out wasn’t wearing a life jacket, and had on heavy overalls and an insulated work coat.
The water temp was about 38°F, after several attempts to get him back in the boat to no avail,they managed to tow him to shore hanging onto the side of the boat ,he was in the water about 8 min,it made me think about all the times I fish alone,in the winter in my kayak most often with the PFD hooked over the seat.
Two things I’ve gleaned from this,I need a kill switch on my trolling motor,and I need to invest in a much better PFD that is non intrusive to wear.
Old 01-14-2020, 06:07 PM
  #2  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: One bridge south of Clearwater Beach
Posts: 1,645
Likes: 0
Received 920 Likes on 460 Posts
Default

I think you need to glean a third thing from that....you need an exposure suit. If you fall off a kayak in 38 degree water without one and your solo, you better hope your within 20-30' of shore. I don't believe that fellow would have made it had the boat not towed him and gave him something very solid to hold on to (or have someone in the boat holding him)....I know my kayak isn't providing any notable flotation or steadiness to hold onto.
Old 01-14-2020, 06:39 PM
  #3  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 14,412
Received 2,035 Likes on 1,501 Posts
Default

did he have to go the hospital for hypothermia?

was help called for at any point?

i agree with the poster above. life jacket doesnt do much good in cold temps. i'd be wearing an exposure suit and also having a life raft aboard because some marine units shut down for winter and response times can be very long
Old 01-14-2020, 06:46 PM
  #4  
mbb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Posts: 2,402
Likes: 0
Received 617 Likes on 325 Posts
Default

Duck hunters died needlessly every year in boating accidents.

Even as far south is Louisiana in the warm springtime, people die. they don't realize that Mississippi River water is 45° bringing down snowmelt from up North.


As a 10-12 yr old on a cold day, wearing blue jeans and a heavy winter jacket, I decided to ride a homemade log raft down a rain-swollen little creek in the woods. It rushed along quickly. This little creek was maybe 15 ft wide and 1 foot deep and it's raging state.

But when it hit the non moving lake that it dumped into... The raft stopped suddenly. I then flew off the raft into the cold water. The raft was taken away by a swirling eddy.

I'm here to tell you that trying to swim in heavy clothing doesn't work. I managed to get to the bank maybe 15 feet away.... And my lips were the only thing above water when I did. One of several very very close calls I had in life that just seem to stick with you.

And, I was by myself. Smart huh?

Last edited by mbb; 01-14-2020 at 06:56 PM.
Old 01-14-2020, 07:21 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: East Texas
Posts: 118
Received 37 Likes on 28 Posts
Default

I can't answer your question with certainty but the original poster did not notice any activity of this nature.

Originally Posted by mystery View Post
did he have to go the hospital for hypothermia?

was help called for at any point?

i agree with the poster above. life jacket doesnt do much good in cold temps. i'd be wearing an exposure suit and also having a life raft aboard because some marine units shut down for winter and response times can be very long
Old 01-14-2020, 07:29 PM
  #6  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 1,034
Received 88 Likes on 69 Posts
Default

If I was to kayak in the cold I would probably see out a dry suite. Give a flotation jacket a look. They are really warm and not to bulky to wear. Inflatables can fail. Last year on Lake Michigan in 5'ers a seasoned sail boater went in in full rain gear and it never went off and he sunk below the surface.
Likes:
Old 01-14-2020, 08:01 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 317
Likes: 0
Received 92 Likes on 49 Posts
Default

I witnessed a a similar accident in Virginia. It was in January early 2000's. Water temps were just above freezing, Bunch of people fishing from canoes and small boats. No engines allowed on that lake. Man fell out of a canoe. After much yelling for help another small boat with only a trolling motor got to him but had to tow him to shore. He had to tie him to the boat because he couldn't hang on. His life jacket saved him. The paramedics arrived quickly and got him to a hospital and fortunately he survived, but if he'd been in the water a few more minutes he would have been gone. I was on the shore when this happened (I was running around the lake). His wife was on the shore too. She was hysterical and the paramedics had to treat her too. I kept his life jacket and we used it in boating safety seminars.
Old 01-14-2020, 10:16 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: East Texas
Posts: 118
Received 37 Likes on 28 Posts
Default

For me, the message here is to wear a kill switch and a pfd. If this man would have been by himself in the boat, he likely would have died. Even in cold water, giving yourself a few more minutes to get back into your boat could mean life or death. Obviously the colder the water is, the more protection you may need. Not sure being in a kayak in very cold water is a good idea at all.
Old 01-15-2020, 01:27 AM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 2,181
Received 469 Likes on 262 Posts
Default

Hello. Water will conduct away your body temp about 20 times faster than air, unfortunately often when you fall into cold water the first thing you do is gasp and breathe in heavily thereby augmenting your problem by possibly breathing in some water, even droplets complicate things. If I remember correctly one or two cold water immersions per year raise your ability to not breathe in heavily and cope with the sudden shock quite effectively. I have done a lot of cold water diving including under ice, obviously with correct exposure suit and never by myself. Having a plan of how to get back into your boat when you are by yourself and practicing it is a very good idea, if you have no ladder you can deploy from the water by yourself you could be in a heap of trouble, PFD and kill cords should be used. Also imagine the other scenarios such as pulling a big guy who is wet and unable to help or uncooperative into a boat with moderate freeboard and no platform, coasties are usually the masters of this kind of thing, sailors have been known to use sails as rescue slings too. There are some frightening numbers on your chances of survival depending upon ambient water temps and physical shape.
Old 01-15-2020, 02:21 AM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Perth WA
Posts: 2,545
Received 497 Likes on 309 Posts
Default

easy message here >>> """USE COMMON SENSE""" .

a little bit of common sense in areas where water is cold when your boating accidents like this don't happen.



Old 01-15-2020, 04:20 AM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 7,576
Received 814 Likes on 464 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by mbb View Post
I'm here to tell you that trying to swim in heavy clothing doesn't work. I managed to get to the bank maybe 15 feet away.... And my lips were the only thing above water when I did. One of several very very close calls I had in life that just seem to stick with you.

And, I was by myself. Smart huh?
It's a huge percentage - I can't remember exactly, but in the order of 90% - of drownings that occur within 30 ft of safe refuge - people who can swim just don't appreciate the dangers of ending up in water accidentally as opposed to intentionally and the difficulty of getting an MOB back onboard is massively underestimated by most people. PFD and a suitable means of calling for help attached to your person (PLB/VHF for instance) are essential for any on-water activities including ordinary boating - and as already mentioned, in cold weather a means of protecting against that cold.
Old 01-15-2020, 05:31 AM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 928
Received 109 Likes on 81 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by 1breakinit View Post
easy message here >>> """use common sense""" .

A little bit of common sense in areas where water is cold when your boating accidents like this don't happen.
common sense ,is the least common,
Old 01-15-2020, 05:50 AM
  #13  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsyltucky
Posts: 7,286
Received 1,535 Likes on 712 Posts
Default

Another thing to be learned from this is that all boats should have some means to be able to get back in the boat from the water. A ladder, a swim deck with a ladder, etc. But it has to be set up so you can get back into your boat from the water if you're boating by yourself. Not just a ladder that you stow in your boat that can only be deployed from within the boat.
Old 01-15-2020, 06:06 AM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Algonac michigan
Posts: 5,940
Received 1,013 Likes on 542 Posts
Default

Mustang makes some nice cold weather gear that floats. If you fish in cold water,why not use that? Face it,if you fall in and don't get out fairly quick,you are toast. Happened to a friend of mine and his dad.
Old 01-15-2020, 06:17 AM
  #15  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 14,412
Received 2,035 Likes on 1,501 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Brad1 View Post
Another thing to be learned from this is that all boats should have some means to be able to get back in the boat from the water. A ladder, a swim deck with a ladder, etc. But it has to be set up so you can get back into your boat from the water if you're boating by yourself. Not just a ladder that you stow in your boat that can only be deployed from within the boat.
definitely

problem is in cold weather one may not be able to climb up if no protection from the cold water
Old 01-15-2020, 06:36 AM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 376
Received 69 Likes on 31 Posts
Default

Wasn’t in a boat, but fell through the ice with winter cloths on and winter boots - hell of a time getting out even with help and was a good mile away from shelter - talk about shrinkage! Out boating in winter I can imagine serious problems. I wonder how those guys up in Alaska prepare for such an event?
Old 01-15-2020, 06:48 AM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 1,419
Likes: 0
Received 43 Likes on 33 Posts
Default

Shocked by just how severe the jolt of jumping into the NJ ocean on JAN 1 years back.

Way worse than expected
Old 01-15-2020, 06:49 AM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 818
Received 837 Likes on 252 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by mystery View Post
did he have to go the hospital for hypothermia?

was help called for at any point?

i agree with the poster above. life jacket doesnt do much good in cold temps. i'd be wearing an exposure suit and also having a life raft aboard because some marine units shut down for winter and response times can be very long

A life jacket can indeed be a lifesaver in instances of cold water immersion. It'll certainly pale in comparison to the value of an immersion suit though.

There are no absolutes when it comes to cold water immersion. The easiest way to think about it is the 1-10-1 model.

1 minute of initial shock where you gasp and hyperventilate and have little control over your reaction. A PFD will keep you afloat during the initial shock.

Following that you have about 10 minutes of cold incapacitation where you will gradually lose the ability to swim. It is during the fleeting few minutes of remaining muscular function that any self-rescue will have to take place. Having a way to reboard the boat can be critical. A swim platform with ladder or some kind of collapsible ladder in the boat that has a tending line within reach of a person in the water is best. The strongest, most fit of us will struggle to otherwise pull ourselves aboard with heavy wet clothing. A PFD and boarding ladder give us a fighting chance.

The last 1 in the model is one hour. One hour before hypothermia kills us. With the right PFD we can survive as hypothermia slowly sucks the life out of us. With no PFD we will drown.

Edited to add: There really aren't any survival suits that lend themselves well to recreational activities like fishing. The more protective the gear the less normal function it allows.

This is a pretty good read.

1/10/1

Last edited by USCG Safe Boating D8; 01-15-2020 at 06:57 AM.
Old 01-15-2020, 07:08 AM
  #19  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: San Diego area.
Posts: 144
Received 36 Likes on 25 Posts
Default

My boat is a I/O that when bought had no way to climb the tall sides to get back into the boat other than the outdrive. We would use the outdrive as a step on our other boat to get on the swimstep platform and it worked sorta. My new boat I installed H/D over size swim steps on the transom and a easily accessed from the water H/D ladder.
Once out fishing at sea in another boat a drunk passenger decided to go swimming. By the time he surfaced the current pulled him away from the boat and he was moving fast. By the time I got the boat to him and a rope in his hands it was nearly impossible to get him back into the boat.
I carry mustang pfd’s, spring suits with booties and gloves just incase something bad happens and we have time to suit up.
Old 01-15-2020, 07:18 AM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 7,576
Received 814 Likes on 464 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by USCG Safe Boating D8 View Post
The last 1 in the model is one hour. One hour before hypothermia kills us.
Which is of course why an effective means of calling for help kept on your person is as essential as a PFD worn at all times - even if you're not boating alone, you can't be sure the other crew members won't be in the water with you or incapacitated from being able to rescue you.

Being able to call for help without staying afloat, nor being able to stay afloat without being able to call for help is going to work out well. Keeping a PLB or HH VHF radio in a grab bag isn't sufficient IMO.

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.