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Electric Boats

Old 12-02-2019, 08:40 AM
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Default Electric Boats

So what's your take on electric mobility now that it's almost 2020?

There's a few companies out there that make electric boats.

I'm curious if anyone is familiar or has seen them in action?
Old 12-02-2019, 09:12 AM
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welcome to tht

Electric Outboards

and there was a thread about this boat recently but i dont know where it went:
Old 12-02-2019, 10:48 AM
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Electric boats are very viable at displacement speeds/hull designs. Not as viable for planning hulls.
Old 12-02-2019, 11:54 AM
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My concern - & I mentioned this in the last electric boat thread - what happens if you swamp? A 12 volt battery submerged under water will not shock you. What battery tech is used to power an electric boat & what does it electrify when submerged in an electrolyte like salt water? What about in an accident when the battery shell cracks?

I would worry about being in the water with a million volt battery lighting me up.


That said - if it can be demonstrated as safe - I like the idea. I use my trolling motor all the time - nothing wrong with the concept of electric.
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Old 12-02-2019, 12:02 PM
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The basic problem with electric boats is the same as with all the electric vehicles: the power density of batteries is very very low compared to gas or diesel. Electric drives work reasonably well if you apply not too much force for not too long. They've made inroads in low-speed situations (e.g. trolling) and in short-range situations (e.g. dinghies to get to and from a mooring). If you need to run significant distances at adequate speeds, electric doesn't work for now.
Old 12-02-2019, 12:03 PM
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The tech will trickle down to marine from automotive like anything else. I expect we'll see some more entry-level/affordable electric options in the next 10 years or so.

There are some nice electric wakeboarding/ski boats you can buy right now....but they are not cheap.
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Old 12-02-2019, 12:08 PM
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Diesel electric systems are used in boats now. No need for huge battery banks. Just generate the electricity as needed. Works well for locomotives.
Old 12-02-2019, 12:17 PM
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Here is one of the other recent threads on this subject: How long until emotors?
Old 12-02-2019, 12:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Rick Dangerous View Post
The tech will trickle down to marine from automotive like anything else. I expect we'll see some more entry-level/affordable electric options in the next 10 years or so.

There are some nice electric wakeboarding/ski boats you can buy right now....but they are not cheap.
I would expect the tech would move very quickly once the issues are figured out but I have a hard time thinking an entry-level affordable option would be available in 10 years if you mean a planing hull saltwater boat. Their may be wake/ski/freshwater boats in that time frame, the difference being the range requirements customers want in the boats. I can see how you can market a wake boat or freshwater boat that has a 50 mile range when used at planing speeds but few who are using their boats in the salt will accept that. I think batteries are a long way from where a saltwater boater with a planing hull will accept it. Basically if you ask me Lithium-Ion batteries will never make the cut, it'll be a new technology which will need some testing before it is accepted as safe enough on a boat. There are quite a few new tech possibilities that seem close to real word use but they are not there yet. Once they do figure it out it will start very expense and get cheaper over time which is why I rule out entry-level boats. It'll start in high end boats.
Old 12-02-2019, 01:06 PM
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Let's do a crude example. Take a boat with a single 150 motor. Let's assume that at cruise the motor produces 100 hp. 1 hp ~ 750 watts, so we're doing 75 KW and in one hour we'll use up 75 KWh. That's Tesla's battery size. There's no regenerative braking so using the 1/3 rule a boat with a Tesla-sized battery will have the range of 20 mins at cruise, about 10 nm, maybe?
Old 12-02-2019, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by OldBay View Post
Diesel electric systems are used in boats now. No need for huge battery banks. Just generate the electricity as needed. Works well for locomotives.
That's how cruise ships are powered now. Diesel generators generating the electricity for electrical motors. Some will be transitioning to LNG instead of diesel soon but will still power the electrical motors. Still uses a lot of fuel currently
Old 12-02-2019, 01:44 PM
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Water intrusion is not the issue most think it would be. Electric motors in seawater are nothing new. Milspec electronics are sealed and epoxy coated all the time. Not difficult or expensive to seal a battery pack. Li-ion or chemistry is fine, (much better than lead acid in a saltwater environment from a safety perspective) the issue here for offshore planing hulls is range and weight. Very simple.

If you want to see practical applications of electric boats, these guys have been building them for a long time. https://www.budsin.com/en/

I have been to their shop several times and seen the boats. They are great for small lakes where HP limits are imposed and water quality is of concern. They are also great for tour boats or water taxis on calm protected waters. Electric motors are also used with diesel gensets on work barges all the time and are frequently used as bow thrusters on large yachts and sportfishers.

There has been some develpment in commercial/military/offshore planing hulls that utilize turbine gensets to power electric motors. You could definietly ski behind them but you wouldn;t want to pay the fuel bill. Think of them as jet airplanes that never fully take off. https://www.geaviation.com/marine/engines/commercial
Old 12-02-2019, 03:26 PM
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Electric boats....plenty around in WWII.
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Old 12-02-2019, 03:59 PM
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We rented a Duffy electric boat in Oceanside, CA a few years ago. It was not fast but it was a lot of fun to cruise around the bay in it.

https://duffyboats.com/
Old 12-02-2019, 07:37 PM
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Originally Posted by coastboater View Post
Electric boats....plenty around in WWII.
??? More info please???

edit,..... Ahhh, subs???
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Old 12-02-2019, 09:15 PM
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The Deep Blue of Torqeedo has several outboards with power to plane small boats--the range is a different problem. Torqeedo has outboards from 1.5 to 80 hp. Inboards from 33 to 133 HP. Batteries range up to 360 Volts and 40 kWh. I have used a 3 hp Torqeedo dinghy motor for 7 years. Works fine--I have even used it as a slow kicker on a 25' pilot house boat. Range at 2 knots pushing a 9 1/2' air floor inflatable, is about 15 miles....faster--less. Top speed about 6 knots--range only. a few miles.
Old 12-02-2019, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by On the Half Shell View Post
That's how cruise ships are powered now. Diesel generators generating the electricity for electrical motors. Some will be transitioning to LNG instead of diesel soon but will still power the electrical motors. Still uses a lot of fuel currently
this was discussed in every thread about electric boats, they use diesel electric for a completely different reason than saving fuel or better efficiency.
Old 12-03-2019, 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by electricmobility View Post
So what's your take on electric mobility now that it's almost 2020?

There's a few companies out there that make electric boats.

I'm curious if anyone is familiar or has seen them in action?
https://www.tradeonlytoday.com/post-.../surging-ahead

I'd be interested in something like this. 3 hour run time would be perfect for back country trips for me. Keep a solar panel on the lift to charge it on off days.... Sign me up!


Old 12-03-2019, 08:17 AM
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While many of the boats competing in electric-only tournaments are custom, Rebele and his team designed Pure Watercraft battery packs to fit in the gas tank compartment of a Tracker Pro 170. The cost breakdown is $6,000 for the motor, $8,500 for the battery pack and $2,000 for the charging system. (Warranty information was unavailable.)
Won't ever be mainstream at that cost. A brand new tracker 170 pro with a 40hp Merc costs $15,000 ready to roll.
Old 12-03-2019, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Elgreco809 View Post
Won't ever be mainstream at that cost. A brand new tracker 170 pro with a 40hp Merc costs $15,000 ready to roll.
No doubt. Give it a few years though... Batteries have come a long way.

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