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Bad Day on the Water

Old 11-26-2019, 09:58 PM
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Originally Posted by c_m_25 View Post

I bet they were turning some rpms though. I bet that lower unit didnít survive.

I have done this exact thing on a aluminum prop on a i/o 4.3l motor. Took all three blades off . If you found that stump in va I probly still have the hub . I look tomarrow in the garage.

Long story short. Was tubing like 10 yrs ago. Did a hard 180 to sling the tubers (4person tube) with a quick drop of throttle halfway In the turn, followed with wot coming out of the turn would sling the boat around instantly. It would really get that tube moving with some g force. . Well I made the 180 but no hole shot coming out . Good thing I always carried two props on that boat. one for pulling another for cruising. I thought I had damaged the lower unit. But never had a issue with it .had that boat for 6-7 year and 3 junkyard motor later was sold with same lower unit .
Old 11-27-2019, 09:12 AM
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Originally Posted by leonreno View Post

These blades were a little stronger.
Stainless steel is five times as strong as aluminum.
Old 11-27-2019, 09:15 AM
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Several people have commented or asked about calculating the speed based on the blade spacing, but the interesting thing is that the boat speed doesn’t really matter, only the pitch of the propeller.

Yes, prop slip comes into play, and that is, to some degree, a function of boat/engine speed, but the differences are very marginal.
Old 11-27-2019, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by lydoniablock View Post
it's a good one, but... photo shop. The horizontal stump surface behind the first blade impact (direction of travel) is far wider than the distance between blades. How did this area avoid contact with a blade? It would have been struck first.
I don’t think so necessarily. Without a side-shot photo, it’s hard to say, but it looks to me like it is about the same distance as the blade spacing, with the big gap there.

And the vertical area of the stump in front of the third blade avoided any impact with the lower unit??? Not a chance. At least it got my long repressed math brain working again
Now you are making a better case. In fact I am surprised nobody has commented on the angle the blades are at; the break is near horizontal implying the hub of the propeller passed over the stump, and of course the skeg as well. How could the skeg not leave a mark and/or kick up the lower unit?

I don’t know if the photo is real or staged. I saw it over a week ago when a friend sent it to me; it had made the rounds on FB. I don’t know where it was taken, who took it, or when it was taken.

But while I concede it could be staged, I do not think it is likely it was Photoshopped. Why do people think someone would go to so much trouble for so trivial a photo? Good digital manipulation is very hard work. Taking three broken blades, jamming them into a stump, and taking a photo with your phone, not so much.
Old 11-27-2019, 11:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Tom W Clark View Post
Several people have commented or asked about calculating the speed based on the blade spacing, but the interesting thing is that the boat speed doesnít really matter, only the pitch of the propeller.

Yes, prop slip comes into play, and that is, to some degree, a function of boat/engine speed, but the differences are very marginal.
you left out deflection...anyone who believes there was a prop strike hard enough to chop three blades off almost perfectly even and the boat or lower unit didnt move enough to stagger the blades is dreaming...

Originally Posted by Tom W Clark View Post
I donít think so necessarily. Without a side-shot photo, itís hard to say, but it looks to me like it is about the same distance as the blade spacing, with the big gap there.



Now you are making a better case. In fact I am surprised nobody has commented on the angle the blades are at; the break is near horizontal implying the hub of the propeller passed over the stump, and of course the skeg as well. How could the skeg not leave a mark and/or kick up the lower unit?

I donít know if the photo is real or staged. I saw it over a week ago when a friend sent it to me; it had made the rounds on FB. I donít know where it was taken, who took it, or when it was taken.

But while I concede it could be staged, I do not think it is likely it was Photoshopped. Why do people think someone would go to so much trouble for so trivial a photo? Good digital manipulation is very hard work. Taking three broken blades, jamming them into a stump, and taking a photo with your phone, not so much.
do you really think a better case had to be made?...physics is a bitch and the photo pretty much defies physics...
Old 11-27-2019, 11:30 AM
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Redneck log splitter.
Old 11-27-2019, 11:30 AM
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It actually looks like the stump may have taken two hits before they broke.
Old 11-27-2019, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Marlin009 View Post
It actually looks like the stump may have taken two hits before they broke.
You know, thatís a really interesting observation. I had assumed that was preexisting damage to the stump, but yes, I agree, it could well be that the blades nicked off some of the stump before the blades really stuck, then broke.
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Old 11-27-2019, 05:53 PM
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Originally Posted by SeaCat22 View Post
Somewhere, there is a dude laughing his arse off, thinking, "Wait 'till they find these 3 prop blades I hammered into this stump". "Someone will probably try and calculate the speed by the separation of the blades". Lol
HAHA spot on man...I saw this photo online the other day and I literally thought to myself "How long before THT has a 5 page debate about this!"
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Old 11-29-2019, 09:18 PM
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The only way that happens is if the boat tried to jump on plane right above the stump. The distance between the front of the stump and the first blade is greater than the distance between the blades. Punch it, stern drops, pop pop pop, blades are sheared off with almost no forward movement. It almost looks like the space between the blades decreases front to back which might indicate a loss of forward movement.
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Old 11-29-2019, 11:39 PM
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Crazy prop pictures for sure
Old 12-01-2019, 11:31 AM
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great pics,

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