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-   -   It floated a couple minutes but then Sank...Total loss (https://www.thehulltruth.com/boating-forum/1046999-floated-couple-minutes-but-then-sank-total-loss.html)

sullivan504 11-18-2019 08:31 AM


Originally Posted by Maggiesmaster (Post 13114211)
I launch my 17 ft boat by myself without leaving my suv. Tie a strong line from the trailer to the boatís eye. Unhitch all straps, then back down to the water. When sufficiently deep, hit the brakes hard; boat slides off the trailer and is stopped by the rope.


I used to do this until the first time I hit a slick spot on the ramp and the truck skidded backwards while I was braking. Truck stopped with rear axle just kissing the waterline.

No disaster (surprisingly, even my pants) but it certainly got the adrenaline pumping. It made launching easier but I won't back down like that any more. I really should have learned after the previous launch a week before that one: the outboard's skeg hooked immediately after the hull started floating and acted as a rudder, causing the boat to drift hard to the side and bumping the hull into a piling.

SeaSquid631 11-18-2019 08:45 AM

Iím skeptical of the effectiveness of a chock on a slippery surface behind a wheel which is locked and sliding Backward opposed to rolling. Hard to beat 4x4 on a slick ramp

fishingfun 11-18-2019 08:52 AM


Originally Posted by Maggiesmaster (Post 13114211)
I launch my 17 ft boat by myself without leaving my suv. Tie a strong line from the trailer to the boatís eye. Unhitch all straps, then back down to the water. When sufficiently deep, hit the brakes hard; boat slides off the trailer and is stopped by the rope. Slowly drive up, park, lock (and chock!) suv, then pull the boat to the bank by the rope,

I had a friend that did this and one day the rope snapped and his boat floated away. No one around so he had to go swimming and it was November in Va.

SWF Pontoon Angler 11-18-2019 10:37 AM


Originally Posted by SeaSquid631 (Post 13115758)
Iím skeptical of the effectiveness of a chock on a slippery surface behind a wheel which is locked and sliding Backward opposed to rolling. Hard to beat 4x4 on a slick ramp

My Touareg is a 4 x 4

cudjoe21075 11-19-2019 08:16 PM

I like the "chocks on lines" move.

Misterfu02 11-19-2019 09:45 PM

I keep a chock in my tow vehicle for this very reason.

rear tires are under, but I tested it using a front tire and it holds the truck, boat and trailer on my ramp. Ymmv.

Finsinchessy 11-20-2019 01:49 AM


Originally Posted by Misterfu02 (Post 13121075)
I keep a chock in my tow vehicle for this very reason.

rear tires are under, but I tested it using a front tire and it holds the truck, boat and trailer on my ramp. Ymmv.

I chock my front tires if my tears are on the slick slime.

SWF Pontoon Angler 11-20-2019 04:11 AM


Originally Posted by cudjoe21075 (Post 13121007)
I like the "chocks on lines" move.

Yes, this sounds like a great Idea.

Ex Nuc 05-28-2020 07:32 PM

Ideally, the tow vehicle should weigh more than the load + trailer being towed. It's one of the reasons why a semi-tractor weighs about 20 tons, typically about the same as a fully loaded 53' semi-trailer, which weigh about 20 tons.

Laws of physics (momentum and impulse) always win out over marketing and slick brochures. Using the right tool for the job holds true when choosing the type of vehicle to tow a load with. It is safer in the end to have a tow vehicle capable of handling a load in a panic stop, crosswind or an evasive maneuver. The empty weight of the tow vehicle should serve as the guide to the maximum weight that should be towed.

ReelTime3979 05-28-2020 07:55 PM

What was your insurance company experience? Did they balk at this? Or did they work with you?

default_user8 05-28-2020 08:49 PM


Originally Posted by acme54321 (Post 13099095)
Say what?

This is true, anyone that owns/owned a standard knows this. E brake is forward only, even tells you in the owner's manual, parked pointed up a hill put car in 1st gear and turn wheel away from curb. That way if it does roll it will roll against the curb and stop moving. Having said all that I still set the parking brake in my truck when I back a boat in to launch by myself. It's called a false sense of security. 😁

SWF Pontoon Angler 05-29-2020 04:38 AM


Originally Posted by ReelTime3979 (Post 13698444)
What was your insurance company experience? Did they balk at this? Or did they work with you?

My insurance company, USAA not only covered everything, (no questioned asked) they gave me more for my Ford than what the Kelly Blue book said it was worth.

Clinker 05-29-2020 04:56 AM

If anyone laughs at any safety precaution you take, from chocs to wearing PFDs just give yourself a smile knowing that you are more experienced than they are and that's why you do it.

Experience does not come from length of time served but from what you learn - I know some 18 year old kids that are more experienced than others in their 60's.

DrewsCrews 05-29-2020 05:03 AM


Originally Posted by default_user8 (Post 13698538)
This is true, anyone that owns/owned a standard knows this. E brake is forward only, even tells you in the owner's manual, parked pointed up a hill put car in 1st gear and turn wheel away from curb. That way if it does roll it will roll against the curb and stop moving. Having said all that I still set the parking brake in my truck when I back a boat in to launch by myself. It's called a false sense of security. 😁

That false sense of security saved me a few years back...Bought a Durango for the family and it also towed well....has the 8 speed with the dial shifter. Long story short..liftgate up, backing down the ramp so I can see the bunks...set E brake, shift into what I thought was Park..get out, load boat, get back in...hit the button to lower the liftgate, wont go down, try again..nada..look at the dash..tells me I cant lower it in gear...GEAR???? I was in reverse!!! I was on the ramp, out of the car, in reverse, loading the boat that was only held back by the E brake.....I must've been in neutral as I rolled to the desired trailer depth, and the shifted into reverse. LUCKY!!!

STIPulation 05-29-2020 05:15 AM


Originally Posted by rdmallory (Post 13099049)
E-brakes are not designed to work in reverse.
They use forward rotation to work.

Doug

This gets repeated often, and is simply not true. Where I work we are required by a federal regulatory agency to use parking brakes and they have to hold "on the steepest incline the vehicle will travel", forward or backward, transmission in neutral, with the normal load the vehicle carries. I looked up the SAE standard for vehicles several years ago while we having a lot of problems with this, and it requires maximum load on a 15% incline in either direction.

ETA: if your brakes don't hold they are either out of adjustment, worn out, or the vehicle may be overloaded.

Sirhc 05-29-2020 05:39 AM

The next time you go to the ramp or even a steep hill, use the E-Brake. I bet you they work, despite what any owners manual say. If they dont work then I'm willing to bet they won't work if you were facing downhill. There is nothing special about how your E-Brakes work, a cable driven by leverage that collapses the caliper or extends the drum pad. Gives you the same action as if you applied pressure to the system via the brake pedal. E-Brakes can go out of adjustment due to cable slack or really worn pads.

billinstuart 05-29-2020 05:49 AM


Originally Posted by SWF Pontoon Angler (Post 13099042)
Most I've talked to said linkage on transmission must have broke.

There probably is no linkage..electronic. Many vehicles release the parking brake when shifting out of park.

billinstuart 05-29-2020 05:53 AM


Originally Posted by STIPulation (Post 13698999)
This gets repeated often, and is simply not true. Where I work we are required by a federal regulatory agency to use parking brakes and they have to hold "on the steepest incline the vehicle will travel", forward or backward, transmission in neutral, with the normal load the vehicle carries. I looked up the SAE standard for vehicles several years ago while we having a lot of problems with this, and it requires maximum load on a 15% incline in either direction.

ETA: if your brakes don't hold they are either out of adjustment, worn out, or the vehicle may be overloaded.

That's a hold over from self energizing drum brakes. Many vehicles today have either discs or a small set of non-energizing drum brakes for parking.

default_user8 05-29-2020 05:59 AM


Originally Posted by Sirhc (Post 13699085)
The next time you go to the ramp or even a steep hill, use the E-Brake. I bet you they work, despite what any owners manual say. If they dont work then I'm willing to bet they won't work if you were facing downhill. There is nothing special about how your E-Brakes work, a cable driven by leverage that collapses the caliper or extends the drum pad. Gives you the same action as if you applied pressure to the system via the brake pedal. E-Brakes can go out of adjustment due to cable slack or really worn pads.

Boy did we hijack this thread lol, I do admit that with today's disc brakes in the rear the E brake is a lot better, I had 3 other standards in the past that the E brake worked much better rolling forward than in reverse(all with rear drums) I always just assumed it was from the auto adjustment feature on drum brakes.


And that makes post number 10! lol

Dan_F 05-29-2020 06:15 AM


Originally Posted by Ex Nuc (Post 13698387)
Ideally, the tow vehicle should weigh more than the load + trailer being towed. It's one of the reasons why a semi-tractor weighs about 20 tons, typically about the same as a fully loaded 53' semi-trailer, which weigh about 20 tons.

Laws of physics (momentum and impulse) always win out over marketing and slick brochures. Using the right tool for the job holds true when choosing the type of vehicle to tow a load with. It is safer in the end to have a tow vehicle capable of handling a load in a panic stop, crosswind or an evasive maneuver. The empty weight of the tow vehicle should serve as the guide to the maximum weight that should be towed.

A semi tractor weighs 8-10 tons, not 20. With doubles that ten ton truck can pull up to 30 tons.


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