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Composite material in new boats. How will it hold up 20 years from now?

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Composite material in new boats. How will it hold up 20 years from now?

Old 10-12-2019, 07:22 PM
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Default Composite material in new boats. How will it hold up 20 years from now?

In the past boats were made mostly with wood, but now the newer boats are lighter and made with rot resistant materials. Opinions?
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Old 10-12-2019, 07:37 PM
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I think you just answered your own question..
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Old 10-12-2019, 07:43 PM
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We have a boat that has the honeycomb core stuff (I don't really know what it's proper name is) but while it may not rot the honeycombs either let go of the top fiberglass or compress or something and it's just as soggy as a rotten plywood deck. Hasn't cracked yet though. Only seems to have happened on the bow though.
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Old 10-12-2019, 08:04 PM
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Coosa 26 Bluewater De-lamination

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Old 10-13-2019, 06:11 AM
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Originally Posted by BigShrimpin View Post
as far as I know this is a very isolated case and most likely the board was contaminated by something before it was layed up.
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Old 10-13-2019, 06:20 AM
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No follow-up in that thread on why it happened.
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Old 10-13-2019, 06:29 AM
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Depends on how many hours they spend in the sunlight. I collect old long surfboards and I have one made in 1956 That was stored indoors and never used. You would think it was just manufactured.
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Old 10-13-2019, 06:35 AM
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Craftsmanship trumps materials. The materials only matter if the craftsmanship is equal.
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Old 10-13-2019, 07:17 AM
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Originally Posted by fishmaster273 View Post
In the past boats were made mostly with wood, but now the newer boats are lighter and made with rot resistant materials. Opinions?
new boats are lighter? Maybe because they are not yet waterlogged. Lighter is not necessarily a goal in boatbuilding. Kinda depends on the application.

As for the rest...dead horse alert....
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Old 10-13-2019, 07:40 AM
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Light weight is definitely not a plus. Of course if your trying to achieve better speed and fuel performance vs ride. Then yeah Light weight helps. But light weight is also a boat builders wet dream boat sale pitch. They buy fiberglass by weight not length. o the lighter its made the cheaper it coast them. Of course their claim to fame is Its lighter and stronger and you pay through the nose for something that is not there. Newer composites definitely improve water and rot concerns. But not all adhere well with resign. So delamination can still happen. And certain foam cell densities break down over time. Balsa Core Was one of the best material ever made that would adhere to resign. But Unfortunately with the most minimal water intrusion you had rot. As you mentioned 20 years from now. Will just wait and see.
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Old 10-13-2019, 08:04 AM
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Originally Posted by THE BARRACUDA View Post
Light weight is definitely not a plus. Of course if your trying to achieve better speed and fuel performance vs ride. Then yeah Light weight helps. But light weight is also a boat builders wet dream boat sale pitch. They buy fiberglass by weight not length. o the lighter its made the cheaper it coast them. Of course their claim to fame is Its lighter and stronger and you pay through the nose for something that is not there. Newer composites definitely improve water and rot concerns. But not all adhere well with resign. So delamination can still happen. And certain foam cell densities break down over time. Balsa Core Was one of the best material ever made that would adhere to resign. But Unfortunately with the most minimal water intrusion you had rot. As you mentioned 20 years from now. Will just wait and see.
This could be the most innacurate post I've seen on here in a long time.
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Old 10-13-2019, 09:41 AM
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Wait and see??

My '98 Pro-Line 251 is completely wood free and made using Divinycell core. About 4300 operating, engine hours.

Not one structural issue anywhere. No delaminations or soft spots.

Look at this picture. There was no waterlogged foam. No separation. No problems.

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Old 10-13-2019, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by tommat View Post
I think you just answered your own question..
he does in almost every thread he starts haha
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Old 10-13-2019, 09:51 AM
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Originally Posted by THE BARRACUDA View Post
Light weight is definitely not a plus. Of course if your trying to achieve better speed and fuel performance vs ride. Then yeah Light weight helps. But light weight is also a boat builders wet dream boat sale pitch. They buy fiberglass by weight not length. o the lighter its made the cheaper it coast them. Of course their claim to fame is Its lighter and stronger and you pay through the nose for something that is not there. Newer composites definitely improve water and rot concerns. But not all adhere well with resign. So delamination can still happen. And certain foam cell densities break down over time. Balsa Core Was one of the best material ever made that would adhere to resign. But Unfortunately with the most minimal water intrusion you had rot. As you mentioned 20 years from now. Will just wait and see.
You probably should not tell this to a Jim Smith owner.
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Old 10-13-2019, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by a7ewizard View Post
Wait and see??

My '98 Pro-Line 251 is completely wood free and made using Divinycell core. About 4300 operating, engine hours.

Not one structural issue anywhere. No delaminations or soft spots.

Look at this picture. There was no waterlogged foam. No separation. No problems.
While the transom may still be solid, the cut of the top of the keyhole looks like it barely had enough area for the gasket on the outer transom plate to seal! I would not be happy with how they cut that out! Any leaks from up top?
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Old 10-13-2019, 02:54 PM
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Originally Posted by bills106 View Post
This could be the most innacurate post I've seen on here in a long time.
Okay??? Which part??? Welcome all forms of explanations. Are you buy any chance a boat builder ??

Last edited by THE BARRACUDA; 10-13-2019 at 02:59 PM.
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Old 10-13-2019, 02:56 PM
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Originally Posted by muskrattown View Post
You probably should not tell this to a Jim Smith owner.
Who is Jim smith??, am I missing something here??? Feed back or examples are always welcome.
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Old 10-13-2019, 03:08 PM
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My 28 Henriques Express is a 1999. It is a solid glass hull with fiberglass fuel tanks. I THINK the stringers are wood glassed over - I'm not sure of that though. All of the top sides, deck, hatches, hard top, etc are built with H80 divinycell. I have very few stress cracks and overall the boat looks great. A good wet sanding, compound, and polish - the boat would look new inside and out.
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Old 10-13-2019, 03:18 PM
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Originally Posted by THE BARRACUDA View Post
Okay??? Which part??? Welcome all forms of explanations. Are you buy any chance a boat builder ??
Perhaps you could add something useful to the discussion by posting some information and examples to support your claims.
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Old 10-13-2019, 03:30 PM
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My 1997 Dakota was all poured composite transom ; hull sides and deck, stringers are honeycomb, 2002 Jupiter is also all composite , my 2000 concept too, not sure where the”new” part in your statement comes from, obviously builders have been using it for 20 plus years
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