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Outboard install time

Old 06-17-2019, 07:41 AM
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Default Outboard install time

Question for those who know more than me, whatís a reasonable amount of time to install and rig twin outboards. Waiting on a new boat, came out of fabrication end of May. Itís been in the rigging shop since that time getting wired and all that.. Twin Mercury DTS 200s are set to arrive first week of July. the boat should be all complete and waiting for the motors. I figured it would be a couple day turn around to install and sea trial, but was told July 15th to July 19th it would be completed. To me that seems a little long but I am not a mechanic/boat builder by any means. Itís a welded aluminum 24ft center console if that makes any difference.

Chase
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Old 06-17-2019, 09:42 AM
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A guy who does it for a living should be able to rig 2 motors in a day. If you give him another day to check over the rigging and test it, I can see 2 days but this better be the best installation you ever saw. Two weeks? They are working you in when they are not doing something else.
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Old 06-17-2019, 09:48 AM
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Originally Posted by gfretwell View Post
A guy who does it for a living should be able to rig 2 motors in a day. If you give him another day to check over the rigging and test it, I can see 2 days but this better be the best installation you ever saw. Two weeks? They are working you in when they are not doing something else.
Would you like to discuss this?
Right here?
It's a very broad open ended claim without any idea of the work involved and once again, gives people a false sense of the actual time it takes to complete.
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Old 06-17-2019, 10:04 AM
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this is a brand new boat being built, let them do their job! let them do it right!
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Old 06-17-2019, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Parker Yacht View Post
Would you like to discuss this?
Right here?
It's a very broad open ended claim without any idea of the work involved and once again, gives people a false sense of the actual time it takes to complete.
Originally Posted by Rolandt03 View Post
this is a brand new boat being built, let them do their job! let them do it right!
It's really hard to grasp the scope of work from the OP's post. If it's a straight forward repower, a week may be fair. If the boat is new, the challenges can be massively open ended even more so with a credible shop if they intend to do prop testing etc. So lets say you're going from Yamaha 2-stroke OX66's to a pair of new Merc v8's w/ AMS mid sections. The similarities are the holes in the transom, that's it. Sometimes a rigger estimated a harness length and didn't realize your particular rigging run is longer than their measurements. The list is endless and putting a time table on it, especially for a new build, is not wise. Prop testing, height adjustments, calibrating & recalibrating, updating, setting toe, etc.
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Old 06-17-2019, 03:00 PM
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The required time also is affected if the boat comes with controls and dash pre-rigged. Some boats are super bare and the installer has to put in the whole steering system also.

Don't forget to add time for electronics installation and any other accessories that may be included. As mentioned before, setting up and calibrating the digital gauges, fuel levels, and controls also add to the time needed. Sea trials, engine height and prop selection can take time. Don't accept a rigging job where they just hang the motors, fire them up on a hose, and then tell you that they are good to go.
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Old 06-17-2019, 07:03 PM
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Two weeks? 80 hours? Really.I agree if you are drilling dash holes and installing the steering it might be another day but 2 weeks is ridiculous.
It does shed some light on why they said rigging my 70 was $800 dollars and that was not drilling a single hole since the Merc and Yamaha stuff was uses the same patterns. I am an amateur, reading the book and I was done in about 4 hours from motor in the crate to turning the key using a come along, not even a real lift.Maybe I just go faster than the regular mechanics. I admit when I watch them, it is apparent to me a time motion study could pay for itself a few times over. They always seem to be at the other end of the shop from the tools they need.
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Old 06-17-2019, 07:22 PM
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It is a new build, the builder is the one installing the engines. They are very thorough and they will be testing props and a full sea trial. I have no doubts that they will get it done right.

I will give them the time they need I just am bummed that they will be longer than I planned. I am waiting to hear back from the builder on what they need the two weeks for but I’m suspecting they pushed the boat back in the priority list as they were doubting the engines would arrive in July.
The boats been in the works for two years so I am getting excited to get on it. When we placed our order in December, we were told it would be done by May if the engines arrived on time. we had a lengthier wait on the engines and now that we have a delivery estimate on the engines I was hoping they could turn it around quickly. It’s a work boat and July is our busy month, some of the equipment off the old boat has been stripped to go on the new one so running a minimal set up right now.
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Old 06-17-2019, 07:35 PM
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It does not matter what the rigging time is. If the dealer told you when the boat will be ready then that is when the boat will be ready.

Or go tell him that he is full of shit and THT told you so. See how far that will get you.

If I were the dealer I would say sorry. I meant to say that it will be ready some time in August.
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Old 06-17-2019, 08:06 PM
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If it is a production boat, they should have it all figured out after the first couple of boats. Unless the buyer wants something custom, it should not take that long. However, there is a holiday involved and maybe the rigger it going on vacation.
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Old 06-17-2019, 09:24 PM
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Customer wants his boat now, dealer said it will be ready in a couple of weeks, after rigging, setting up the motor, water testing, correcting issues found on water test, water test again, tighten things up, clean the boat, check fluids, lights, electronics, fit to trailer, final wipe down/clean of boat. Call customer and set up delivery. Happy customer, forgets all about how long it took.

Scenario two: Customer wants his new boat now. Dealer says it will be ready in two weeks. Customer gets pissy and dealer says alright come get it at the end of week one. Dealer installs motors, fires them up on the hose, cleans the boat, calls pissy customer and tells him to come get his boat. Customer takes boat out for the weekend and finds all the issues wrong that the dealer was going to find in week two. Schedules warranty work and is told dealer is four weeks out because he is properly riggin boats for his patient customers.

Which scenario works for you?
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Old 06-18-2019, 03:52 AM
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Custom rigging takes time, if you want it done right. Rome was not built in a day, or two weeks. I’m dealing with one of those “Hurry up, when is it going to be ready” customers on a project now and it’s not an enjoyable process. I’m absolutely making sure my job is done right, but I’m doing everything I can to just get this job done so I don’t have to deal with them anymore. Don’t be that guy! Let them get their job done without breathing down their necks. Just like I had to tell our customer, I’m not trying to be a dick but if you wanted your boat sooner, you should’ve got the ball rolling on it earlier and got it to us sooner than you did.
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Old 06-18-2019, 05:21 AM
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Originally Posted by CD156 View Post
Question for those who know more than me, what’s a reasonable amount of time to install and rig twin outboards. Waiting on a new boat, came out of fabrication end of May. It’s been in the rigging shop since that time getting wired and all that.. Twin Mercury DTS 200s are set to arrive first week of July. the boat should be all complete and waiting for the motors. I figured it would be a couple day turn around to install and sea trial, but was told July 15th to July 19th it would be completed. To me that seems a little long but I am not a mechanic/boat builder by any means. It’s a welded aluminum 24ft center console if that makes any difference.

Chase

there was a good thread on this subject maybe a month or so ago

ps. you have not even told us what hours they are quoting for the install, just the dates it should be ready. most boat yards/builders have a back log so its possible they are not even starting hanging / rigging until july 12 or 15! if you have a firm date of the engines being delivered, i'd talk to them and see if they can do you a solid and turn it around quicker.
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Old 06-18-2019, 12:48 PM
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I suppose the definitive answer is how much is he charging you? If it is not $6000-8000 he is not spending 2 weeks working on it (80 hours @ $75-100 an hour, typical labor charge). There is a lot of "sitting around the yard" time in there.
Maybe I have unrealistic expectations because when my boat is down, it is the only thing I do until it is going again, to the point that it makes my wife nuts but she is also asking me" when will the boat will be ready".
I understand in a big shop, everyone's boat is down. I apologize to David and Parker if I offended them. Seriously, My bad.
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Old 06-18-2019, 06:11 PM
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They haven't said that the job will take two weeks, they've said it will take two weeks for them to fit it in. When I've bought a new car, twice I've picked it up the day it arrived at the dealer - once I had to wait a week from it getting to the dealer before they could have it ready. Look at it this way - if they sold so few boats they could jump on it the minute it arrived and work on it non-stop and have it ready for you in a couple of days, wouldn't you worry about how few people bought a boat from them?
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Old 06-18-2019, 07:50 PM
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Depending on where the OP is, it may still be the beginning of the season and the shop is working overtime anyway because EVERYBODY wants their start of season boat work done NOW!
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Old 06-19-2019, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Clinker View Post
They haven't said that the job will take two weeks, they've said it will take two weeks for them to fit it in. When I've bought a new car, twice I've picked it up the day it arrived at the dealer - once I had to wait a week from it getting to the dealer before they could have it ready. Look at it this way - if they sold so few boats they could jump on it the minute it arrived and work on it non-stop and have it ready for you in a couple of days, wouldn't you worry about how few people bought a boat from them?
I understand that but the question was how long does it take to actually install it/them. I say if the dealer is honest, divide the labor cost by the hourly rate. That should be a fairly accurate guess about how long it took them.
We all understand boats at the dealer sit in the yard far more than they sit in the shop, no matter why they are there.
When you are making the decision about DIY, that needs to be taken into account if you use your boat a lot.
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