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Wood on Boston whaler

Old 05-15-2019, 02:47 PM
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Default Wood on Boston whaler

I have mahogany on my Boston Whaler Montauk 17. I am noticing it looks a little rough in some spots on my seat.

I sanded at 120 grit and varnished the anchor locker and it looks great.

do I need to take the seat apart in order to varnish or could I just hit with some sandpaper without taking it apart and put a coat of varnish on?
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Old 05-15-2019, 03:01 PM
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Yes, it certainly can be varnished in place. It all has to do with the level of fussiness or perfection.
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Old 05-15-2019, 03:04 PM
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120 is a bit on the "ruff" side.
Leastwise for finsih coats, I'd use more like 220-320 grt.
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Old 05-15-2019, 04:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Parker Yacht View Post
120 is a bit on the "ruff" side.
Leastwise for finsih coats, I'd use more like 220-320 grt.
my question is do I need to take the seat apart or can I leave it together and sand and then varnish? 320 can work.....
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Old 05-15-2019, 04:27 PM
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320 gr? Are you going for a mirror polish?
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Old 05-15-2019, 04:39 PM
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320 is a bit of an overkill usually. Likewise, yes 120 is a bit coarse for varnish. 150 or 220 depending on the condition of the current varnish and what you are looking for as a finish.
I answered your specific question in post #2.
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Old 05-15-2019, 05:11 PM
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Originally Posted by NedLloyd View Post
320 is a bit of an overkill usually. Likewise, yes 120 is a bit coarse for varnish. 150 or 220 depending on the condition of the current varnish and what you are looking for as a finish.
I answered your specific question in post #2.
Im pretty fussy.....i have captains varnish. Do I need to remove all the parts to the bench and varnish?
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Old 05-15-2019, 05:16 PM
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you need to strip it nekked
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Old 05-15-2019, 06:05 PM
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I was sure this was something else
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Old 05-15-2019, 06:16 PM
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Do not take the seat apart. Tape off with painters tape, sand with 220 grit, put on at least 3 coats sanding between each one. Sand with 320 grit before the final coat. If you put on one coat, you have sanded off more than you put back on.

If you use coarse paper the varnish will look good at first but the shine will dull in a matter of weeks or months. Fine sandpaper before the final Coat will leave you with a shinier, more long lasting finish.

I find Epiphanes Wood Finish Gloss to be longer lasting and easier to work with than most varnishes. It allows you to recoat without sanding if you want to, although itís easier to see where youíve been if you give it a light sanding between coats.
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Old 05-16-2019, 04:13 AM
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Originally Posted by 71Outrage View Post
Do not take the seat apart. Tape off with painters tape, sand with 220 grit, put on at least 3 coats sanding between each one. Sand with 320 grit before the final coat. If you put on one coat, you have sanded off more than you put back on.

If you use coarse paper the varnish will look good at first but the shine will dull in a matter of weeks or months. Fine sandpaper before the final Coat will leave you with a shinier, more long lasting finish.

I find Epiphanes Wood Finish Gloss to be longer lasting and easier to work with than most varnishes. It allows you to recoat without sanding if you want to, although itís easier to see where youíve been if you give it a light sanding between coats.
thank you so much this is great advice. Iíve had a lot of succcess with captains varnish.

also Iíve been hitting the hatch for the anchor every year with 120 and then putting a coat of varnish this is where I got the idea....
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Old 05-16-2019, 05:55 AM
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Some good advice above. One thing you should try to do is keep the boat covered. Even if you buy a cheap mooring cover, it will help your varnish job last. I used to varnish the seats/console/anchor locker on our old 15 Super Sport. I preferred removing everything in the offseason and putting all the components in a room where dust was kept at a minimum to do the job. Eight coats of Epiphanes was my ritual. If covered, it would last for years, in lieu of redo's every year or touch ups.
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Old 05-25-2019, 12:34 PM
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The wood used on classic Montauks, with few exceptions, was teak, not mahogany.
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Old 06-25-2019, 08:22 PM
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How do I remove the seat from the boat to take my garage to refinish. And I think I will also hit all the other areas on my boat........

pic enclosed

https://photos.app.goo.gl/LQJ5F4BZ2WsezUik8

I see the 4 screws held by the wood piece is it as simple as unscrew those? Then what about the wood what is holding that in place
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Old 06-25-2019, 10:36 PM
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You need to remove the rod holders first, then use a 5/32” nut driver to unscrew the nylocjs on the inside while using a #2 Phillips screwdriver to keep the screw heads of the machine screws from spinning.

Once you removed all eight machine screws from the pivot blocks, carefully lift the seat back straight out, then wiggle the pivot blocks off the ends of the stainless steel pivot frames.

It is easier if somebody helps you by slightly spreading the pivot blocks apart while you lift the seat back out.

I also recommenced you mark the pivot blocks so they go back in exactly the same position and orientation; the screw holes are not always perfectly symmetrical.
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