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Self priming bilge pump?

Old 04-18-2019, 09:56 AM
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Default Self priming bilge pump?

Trying to find a bilge pump that will self prime in a lifting situation. I want to mount the pump up higher where I can reach well and mount an intake where there is little room.

All I'm finding are the jabsco pumps again like 3-5/6 gallon a minute. Are there any other viable options for this? Doesn't need to be automatic but I want it to move a lot of water if needed. Tried several searches but I'm not searching right or there isn't much available.

Thanks for any help!
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Old 04-18-2019, 10:01 AM
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Diaphragm pump. Flow rates much lower than common centrifugal bilge pumps
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Old 04-18-2019, 11:47 AM
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If you have an I/B you can rig a crash pump y-valve and hose system to your existing RW pump feed. That might pump up to say 20 gal /min for a small block gasser. But that would only be for manual emergency use as it is tricky to use.
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Old 04-18-2019, 02:57 PM
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Would a wash down pump work for your application?
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Old 04-18-2019, 06:06 PM
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That’s going to be a tough one. Centrifugal moves a lot of water, but not self priming. Probably some sort of Jabsco is your best compromise (will move descent water and self priming.) It will be pricy though as you will need a good size DC motor to drive it.
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Old 04-18-2019, 06:11 PM
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Whale now offer a self-priming pump with the pickup mounted remote. But not large capacity. Only 450 GPH

https://www.westmarine.com/buy/whale...4?recordNum=29
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Old 04-18-2019, 06:23 PM
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Thanks gentlemen! Not I/o so that won't work, it's an inspected boat so can't do the washdown idea.

I may be able to double up with the west Marine option and make that work.

Or.... May just have to get these stubby T-rex arms down into the bilge to get the total flow I like.

Thanks again!
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Old 04-18-2019, 06:28 PM
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You can put a bronze foot valve on an end suction centrifugal pump and it will do what you describe. But typically those are higher energy pump configurations. What size boat and what kind of power do you have?
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Old 04-18-2019, 06:44 PM
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What about putting the pump on tall bracket, so you can lower the pump down to the bottom of the bilge but fasten the bracket to the boat near the top? The hose and wiring could follow the bracket too.
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Old 04-18-2019, 06:46 PM
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I have a similar situation. My Downeaster has a 4” wide area at the bottom of the keel and you are never getting down there for service. I mounted a 4000 pump on a plate with the switch but it did not go low enough. I had to go back to an 1250 to fit at the bottom. That left me uncomfortable with such a small pump on a big boat. I took the 4000 and made an emergency pump with a 1.5” discharge hose. If the s—t hits the fan, I can drop it in and put the 1.5” hose over the side. That baby moves some water.
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Old 04-19-2019, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by km1125 View Post
What about putting the pump on tall bracket, so you can lower the pump down to the bottom of the bilge but fasten the bracket to the boat near the top? The hose and wiring could follow the bracket too.
This may end up being the winner! Sometimes it is the simple solutions that are hardest to see.
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Old 04-19-2019, 07:48 AM
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Originally Posted by xlr8ngn View Post
You can put a bronze foot valve on an end suction centrifugal pump and it will do what you describe. But typically those are higher energy pump configurations. What size boat and what kind of power do you have?
Twin Yamaha outboards on a 25' center console. I usually like 3 pumps on my boats but access is terrible compared to what I have done In the past. Boat is self bailing but that doesn't help in a hull breech situation.

On my bigger boat I have 3 pumps. 2- 3/4" and an emergency 1.5". I like redundancy when it comes to being able to get water out of the boat.
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Old 04-19-2019, 08:33 AM
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The hardest thing to do is to find a suitable pump. Most pumps are not built to cycle on and off often, or run dry. They are built to run, and when they start and stop often like a bilge application can have the motor windings overheat. If they run dry the seal is ruined and it leaks out on your deck. I will look around and see if there may be a purpose built pump for your type of application.
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Old 04-19-2019, 09:34 AM
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Thank you for looking.
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Old 04-19-2019, 10:48 AM
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one of mine is a whale gulper

it has a hose extending down into the lowest part of the bilge

works ok but cant get the last inch of water out with the mesh filter thing on the end to keep things from getting sucked in
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Old 04-19-2019, 11:01 AM
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https://www.defender.com/product.jsp...232&id=3021276

How about this one at 15gpm. Has a dry run impeller design for 5 min, self priming lift to 4ft. The negative I see is the motor does not have cooling fins so it will not dissipate heat that well and could overheat if ran for more than 1/2hr continuously. It is also a painted steel casing on the motor that will eventually rust with saltwater.
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Old 04-19-2019, 02:56 PM
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Give Depco Pump a calland tell them exactly what you are looking for. They are extremely knowledgeable and carry every pump known to man that's worth knowing about.
Depco Pump Company
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Old 04-19-2019, 07:39 PM
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Get a big hand powered diaphragm pump.
If you're really concerned about a hull breech, great to be prepared, but how it would likely go down isn't a scenario where you need a pump on for hours, and it's just the pump that's keeping you afloat... think about ti: if you have a hull breech that is so bad you can't slow the water flow to a trickle in a few minutes, you likely aren't going to have much luck with 3 or HOWEVER many battery powered pumps you have. You'll also be focusing on other things by then, like, not being in the boat when it sinks, maybe, getting someone to come pick you up if it does sink...those kinda things.
A hull breech doesn't generally go down like that though, what would likely happen is you'd have your hull breech, say you dose off and you wake up when you hit something, and then you go down to the engine room or cabin and you say, holy shit there's a lot of water in the boat, i've just put a hole in it. Then if you haven't shat yourself, you'll look for the hole and you'll jam something in it or cover it from the outside with some impervious fabric or whatever the hell you have to do, but it won't be like a long drawn out time period where the pumps are keeping you afloat and that's the only think saving you....And if for some odd reason my made up story about how every hull breech ever goes down should differ, well then your battery powered pumps would drain your batteries quickly enough or to the point where you're going to need to put in some elbow grease.
Those things can move a lot of water and you can run the suction to wherever you want. So it can also be used to dry the bilge where you can normally get to. If you do go this route, make a couple handles for it, they always break, and most importantly make it like twice as long as the manufacturer did...you'll have to take it easy and not break the pump, but it sure willl make life easy.
You said your boat was inspected though...why don't you already have one of those?
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Old 04-20-2019, 05:12 AM
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Those hand-powered diaphragm pumps actually don't shift nearly as much water as an electric.. The double action jabsco, for example, is only 1800GPH, at best. Without the person operating it tiring. Smaller ones can be as low as 600GPH. I have experience with them, we had them as a survey requirement on our commercial fishing boats, only got checked once a year for gear survey. If you have an inboard, and the engine is still running, a 2" impeller pump will shift much, much, more. Or a couple of conventional bilge pumps--if you are outboard powered, engines are likely still running, so you have plenty of battery power. You should always have two anyway, IMO, separately powerd, for redundancy.
If you have a decent hull breach under the deck of a trailer boat, you won't likely be accessing it in a hurry. Or keeping up with it with any kind of pump you are likely to have fitted.
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Old 04-20-2019, 07:41 AM
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Call Jabsco for the pump. (Maybe #18600123 as a starting point). They make a lot of pumps. I would ask them what is needed given lift distance and desired capacity.
Call or look up from Perko the brass strainer head which goes in the bilge.
Rubber hoses you can find.

Confirm with Jabsco whether the pump is a run dry or not.!!! You need to know.
Or any larger marine supply house should know how to put it together.

Good luck.
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