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Dock Cleats

Old 04-13-2019, 04:51 AM
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Default Dock Cleats

Is there a spec for load ratings for dock cleats? I know there is a line size guideline for the size of the cleat, but cannot locate info on dock cleat material (SS, aluminum, galvanized iron, etc.) and load ratings.
Thanks in advance for any help.
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Old 04-13-2019, 05:36 AM
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I have never seen one broken! That being said I have seen dozens pulled out! The attachment hardware will fail 99.999999999 times before the cleat. Unless of course you are using plastic cleats?
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Old 04-13-2019, 05:50 AM
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Originally Posted by offshorebri View Post
I have never seen one broken! That being said I have seen dozens pulled out! The attachment hardware will fail 99.999999999 times before the cleat. Unless of course you are using plastic cleats?
yup

through bolted to non-rotted wood using marine grade stainless is a good first step
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Old 04-13-2019, 06:12 AM
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We had cleats shear off in Florence that were cast aluminum on the marina floating dock. That is why I am trying to get information for a better replacement. The cleats were ~ 12 years old.
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Old 04-13-2019, 07:03 AM
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This is an area where you don't want to go cheap. I've seen MANY broken off docks at public ramps. Pulled out as well. These see a lot of abuse. For a dock I'd go with Galvanized and large enough to hold your boat in a hurricane. Through bolted where possible. BIG lags if that's all you can do.
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Old 04-13-2019, 07:06 AM
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The ones I used on my dock were foundry made and were definitly lifetime. No steel is best.
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Old 04-13-2019, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by kennyboy View Post
The ones I used on my dock were foundry made and were definitly lifetime. No steel is best.
Please define 'foundry made'. Out of what material?
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Old 04-13-2019, 09:40 AM
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Mooring Bollards & Cleats - J.C. MacElroy Company page 26 and after of the product catalog should answer most if not all your questions.

Last edited by 1NO REGRETS; 04-13-2019 at 09:46 AM.
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Old 04-13-2019, 11:05 AM
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I like to kick them as hard as possible in the dark with flipflops apparently. This one was very well mounted to the dock.
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Old 04-13-2019, 12:56 PM
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There are places meant for walking which should not have cleats.
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Old 04-13-2019, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by v12mac View Post

I like to kick them as hard as possible in the dark with flipflops apparently. This one was very well mounted to the dock.
No points, toe are all straight. Kick harder!
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Old 04-13-2019, 02:50 PM
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never had a failure with a galvanized cleat. I always use a 2x8 backer board about 24" long under the dock because I don't trust the 2x6 dock planks which are often not in the best of shape, drill through and use 1.5" washer with two nuts to clamp them down.
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Old 04-13-2019, 04:18 PM
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Bigger is better. As is more cleats than necessary. One in each side of every corner, and a mid cleat on all useable sides.
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Old 04-13-2019, 04:37 PM
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While bigger is better I am looking for load ratings on cleats. I want specific info and cannot locate an specs.
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Old 04-13-2019, 04:40 PM
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Originally Posted by aftergolf View Post
While bigger is better I am looking for load ratings on cleats. I want specific info and cannot locate an specs.
never seen a load rating. But how are you going to even ballpark estimate load? Size the cleats to be at least handle the lines in use, and you should be good to go.
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Old 04-13-2019, 04:48 PM
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If my boat weighs 25,000 pounds wet, the cleats need to be rated for at least that amount. Since we had an aluminum cast cleat break with floating docs during Florence, clearly the cleats either were not rated correctly, had corrosion or both. I need to replace with a cleat that will do the job adequately if my vessel stays in her slip in a CAT 1 storm.
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Old 04-13-2019, 05:24 PM
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google Cleats boats us foundation. This should give a better understanding of cleats. Try to buy the proper cleat with known brand name on the cleat.
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Old 04-13-2019, 05:30 PM
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Originally Posted by aftergolf View Post
If my boat weighs 25,000 pounds wet, the cleats need to be rated for at least that amount. Since we had an aluminum cast cleat break with floating docs during Florence, clearly the cleats either were not rated correctly, had corrosion or both. I need to replace with a cleat that will do the job adequately if my vessel stays in her slip in a CAT 1 storm.
weight of the boat has little to do with that. Wind cross section is much more significant.
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Old 04-13-2019, 05:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Riverbend View Post
google Cleats boats us foundation. This should give a better understanding of cleats. Try to buy the proper cleat with known brand name on the cleat.
Looked at Boat US and did not find much info
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Old 04-13-2019, 05:38 PM
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Helped rebuild a marina docks here on Long Island after Sandy came through years ago. 600-700 feet of docks were destroyed and rebuilt with 8-10" piles every 10' on center. We only put cleats in when a customer requested them. They were told to tie off their boat to the pikes instead because the odds of breaking one of these is highly unlikely. Most customers listened to the owners thinking while others wanted/needed cleats. I thinks the ones that wanted the cleats had no idea how to tie off a dock line to a pile. OP, is this an option on your dock?
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