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Old 05-23-2010, 09:56 AM
  #12  
k9medic
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Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Central FL
Posts: 1,222
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I coached my oldest son's 4-6 y/o soccer team last year. I had a great time with one exception - I was always coaching, and didn't get to enjoy watching my son having fun playing a game that he loves. He is very good at soccer and football (can't catch a baseball to save his life though). I did enjoy watching the kids develop their skills over the season though.

I had 3 types of kids. The ones who wanted to be there, the ones who didn't care either way (parents made them come) and the ones who watched butterflies. All 3 types got to play, but when I noticed the butterfly watchers losing interest or the 4 year olds getting tired, I swapped them out for the ones who wanted to play.

This last season, I chose not to coach, but to watch. The city got some guy to coach who had never even seen a soccer ball, but his daughter was on the team. He was nice guy, but his philosophy was that every one played an even amount of time, regardless of interest or age. He had the 4 year olds playing a full 10 minute quarter which just exhausted them, while the 6 year old kids were sitting on their butts begging to play. His own daughter didn't want to play, yet he yelled at her to get on the field while 3 other kids begged to go on the field.

At the end of the day, my son broke his collar bone 1 practice after their first game (he did get to score 3 goals though) and couldn't finish the season. He made the statement "but I didn't break my leg, I can still play."

Point of the story - as a coach you will never get the respect that you deserve regardless of how well you do, but the kids will always remember the respect that you showed them.
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