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Old 04-12-2010, 08:07 PM
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Default Drive on vs. float on trailer

Still pretty new to boating. Can anyone explain to me the difference between a float on trailer and a drive on trailer and the advantages of either. I think I have an idea. It may be a dumb question and probably self explanatory. So if the question warrants any smart remarks, I'll take 'em like a man.

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Old 04-13-2010, 04:13 AM
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Hmm...

I always thought a "float on" style trailer and a "drive on" style trailer were the same thing: a bunk trailer with wide bunks that are generally positioned low and wide on the hull.





Many ramps prohibit "driving" the boat on the trailer because prop wash can cause excessive erosion at the end of the ramp.
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Old 04-13-2010, 04:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gf View Post
Hmm...

I always thought a "float on" style trailer and a "drive on" style trailer were the same thing:
They are.
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Old 04-13-2010, 05:04 AM
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Float-On is a brand name....

What everyone else said is correct...the boat is loaded on the trailer using its own power as opposed to winching it all the way up.
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Old 04-13-2010, 05:22 AM
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I agree with the group statements. Do you mean "float on" (bunk) vs. "easy-load" (roller) trailers? If that is the case, there are several advantages and disadvantages to each type. -GD
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Old 04-13-2010, 04:19 PM
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"Float-on" is a just a brand name, like Kleenex.
Oddly enough I have seen a Float-On brand trailer that said right on the side "Do not Submerge" The trailer was a 40' long bunk trailer designed for hauling 2 small boats at a time, but had to be loaded with a lift.
Maybe it should have been called "Crane-On"
I have both a Bunk and roller trailers, I like the bunk trailers better, but Power loading is allowed in my area. If not I would probably prefer the rollers
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Old 04-13-2010, 08:45 PM
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Thanks for the input. Just trying to educate myself a little.
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Old 04-22-2010, 11:32 PM
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Back it in far enough, and they are all float-on trailers.
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Old 04-23-2010, 05:09 AM
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Default Not exactly erosion. worse. It causes a gully then a sandbar .

Quote:
Originally Posted by gf View Post
Hmm...

I always thought a "float on" style trailer and a "drive on" style trailer were the same thing: a bunk trailer with wide bunks that are generally positioned low and wide on the hull.





Many ramps prohibit "driving" the boat on the trailer because prop wash can cause excessive erosion at the end of the ramp.
I have seen where at certain tides there is no way to get the trailer deep enough that the boat can make it back on the trailer.A gully and a sand bar at the end of the ramp is a bad ramp.
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