The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum

Go Back   The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum > BOATING FORUMS > SportFishing and Charters Forum
Search

Notices

Random Quote: Use the Power of THT!!!
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-31-2004, 11:17 AM
  #1    
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Dubai, U.A.E
Posts: 127
Default Man killed by Marlin

Jose Rojas Mayarita, 39, hooked a 10ft (3m) blue Marlin off Acapulco. He struggled with it for hours, and as he reeled it in, it leapt and landed on top of him, impaling his stomach with its sword. He drifted in the Pacific for four days until he was spotted by a U.S. helicopter. His pulse was week, but he explained what had happened. Intestinal fluid had leaked into his kidneys and he died of renal failure in hospital on 1 August. Independant.

Has anyone else any of these kind of real stories or pictures.

__________________
================================

Tight Lines
Sheik Mark of Dubai "Sail fish hunter and Vodka drinking champion"


"If you want to Soar with the Eagles, don't surround yourself with Turkey's"
mcharman is offline  
Old 10-31-2004, 11:28 AM
  #2    
Senior Member

 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Quebec, Canada and Pirates Cove, OBX, NC
Posts: 19,397
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

Read on another board that*a guy who got stabbed by a swordfish five or six years ago and was found dead with the fish in the boat . . . do not know if this is truth or myth ? ? ?
__________________




.[________________________________


auguste is online now  
 
Old 10-31-2004, 11:47 AM
  #3    
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Dubai, U.A.E
Posts: 127
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

I guess the moral to the story is :-


"NEVER BRING A BOTTLE TO A SWORD FIGHT"

__________________
================================

Tight Lines
Sheik Mark of Dubai "Sail fish hunter and Vodka drinking champion"


"If you want to Soar with the Eagles, don't surround yourself with Turkey's"
mcharman is offline  
Old 10-31-2004, 03:14 PM
  #4    
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

There was an incident in Australia about 10yrs ago where the "wireman" was impaled through the chest by the bill of a huge black marlin. I dont believe he died though. I think a helicopter picked him up at sea,
 
Old 10-31-2004, 03:40 PM
  #5    
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: mass/Point Judith, RI dockage
Posts: 9,101
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

One of the espn fishing shows during a tourney showed a wireman get skewered through the arm. they had to head in but it wasn't life threatening. Sure bummed the crew out though.
gerg is offline  
Old 10-31-2004, 04:07 PM
  #6    
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Dubai, U.A.E
Posts: 127
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

Here is another one Baraccuda this time:

Fisherman Hospitalized After Barracuda Bite
Rescuers Pry Fish Off Victim

POSTED: 11:30 a.m. EDT August 7, 2003

ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. -- A Palatka fisherman is home from the hospital a morning after he was bitten by a barracuda that jumped into his boat.

"The fish got me instead of me getting the fish," Brian Warwick told Channel 4's Damany Lewis.

Warwick and some friends were fishing for bait about nine miles off the coast of St. Augustine Wednesday when Warwick caught a barracuda. A moment later, a second barracuda jumped into the boat, biting Warwick.

"He was after the bait that was in the other barracuda's mouth and he came out and hit me in the lower abdomen," Warwick said.

Rescuers had to pry the fish off him, then he was taken to Shands-Jacksonville Medical Center, where he was treated and released.

This was Warwick's first time fishing for barracuda and he said it will most likely be his last.

"I'll bass fish in the river. Their teeth are not near as big," Warwick said
__________________
================================

Tight Lines
Sheik Mark of Dubai "Sail fish hunter and Vodka drinking champion"


"If you want to Soar with the Eagles, don't surround yourself with Turkey's"
mcharman is offline  
Old 10-31-2004, 04:34 PM
  #7    
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Dubai, U.A.E
Posts: 127
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

And another,

A Marlin to Remember
By Capt. Peter B. Wright (more by this author)


I'm often asked if any particular catches are more memorable than others. Of course, the biggest marlin stand out, but other fish stick in your mind for different reasons. One of my most memorable was a black marlin that we tagged and released one day in the middle of Australia's Cormorant Pass. This fellow then turned on a dime, crashed into the boat and skewered my deckhand in the chest with its massive bill. That was 30 years ago, but the day remains burned into my brain; I could never forget that fish. Those of you who saw professionally distributed copies of the home video shot that day probably won't forget either, and many of you have questioned me about the day Jimmy Burns got speared.

My team on board Kingfish included angler Bill Chapman and wire man Emmett ''Mutt'' Coble. I had talked another captain, Jim Burns, into coming along as our third crewman for a couple of weeks. Burns was a handsome young man with a beautiful wife and two small children. A bricklayer by trade, he had a great physique with a sculptured musculature from lifting thousands of bricks and concrete blocks.

Joining us on the first mothership trip this far north of Cairns were noted Australian Capt. Peter Bristow and his crew and charter on Avalon. Along with our catamaran mothership, the Tropic Queen, we trolled north along the outside edge of the Great Barrier Reef until we were due east of Lizard Island, where we reached the top of Number Ten Ribbon Reef.

We enjoyed wonderful fishing as we progressed farther and farther north, but wondered each day when we were going to get too far up the reef and run out of fish. Some days one game boat would have slow fishing, but the other would have a great day, so we kept pressing on into new territory.

I couldn't believe my eyes the morning I saw a sleek sport-fishing cruiser approaching from the north. Garrick Agnew, an Australian multimillionaire, had heard about the giant marlin being caught off Cairns and had run his custom-built 53-foot Pannawonica completely around the top half of Australia, over 3,000 miles from his home port of Perth. On Kingfish we had already tagged two or three marlin that day, and just before the two boats met in the middle of Cormorant Pass, we hooked up again.

The fish made a long run with enormous greyhounding leaps across the surface. Anywhere else in the world, the 600-pound marlin would have been a trophy. Here it was slightly above average, but no where near ''large'' and well short of the ''it's-a-horse'' distinction we used for marlin over 1,000 pounds and later called ''granders.''

The hook might have started out in the fish's mouth, or maybe it was hooked in the fish's back from the start. In either case, the marlin rapidly took line off the big Fin-Nor reel faster than I could back up in Kingfish. It took 200 yards out before I could get the boat turned around and give chase. I ran at planing speed from the control station in the tower. As we chased the marlin across the waves I could see the remains of the scad bait lying on its shoulder, where the hook had caught near the dorsal fin.

Chapman had recovered most of the line by the time the marlin began to slow down to recover from the oxygen debt incurred in the long, sustained run. All those majestic leaps had helped burn up the available oxygen in the bloodstream, and oxygen was necessary to allow the mighty muscles to function.

The thought flashed through my mind that here was our chance to show the new guys how a really good crew fought and caught marlin. I dropped from the tower to the flying bridge and spun Kingfish with the engines to back up after the marlin. Because I had stopped in a position up-sea and upwind from the fish, I was able to back up fast with no water pouring over the transom covering boards and with little spray even reaching the angler and crew.

The marlin continued to swim down-sea and came up to surf on the swell and chop generated by extended periods of 15- to 25-knot southeasterly trade winds. As the fish got a free ride from each wave, the tip of its huge sickle tail would protrude slightly above the surface of the water, and through our polarized sunglasses we could all see the color of the huge body under the surface.

I kept Kingfish backing up hard but angled her off to one side. Once Chapman had two turns of the 30 feet of doubled 130-pound line safely around the reel, he increased the drag. With the boat racing back after the fish and the increased drag slowing the marlin's forward speed, we continued to gain line until the big snap swivel connecting line and leader came within Coble's reach.

Coble, a tall, burly and athletic man, took hold of the swivel and heaved, then got a wrap of wire around a gloved hand and heaved again. The fish came ever closer to the boat. Now I could see that the leader was tangled around the fish and was pulling from a point behind the rigid bone of the pectoral fins. The marlin was both hooked in the dorsal fin and lassoed by a hitch of wire around its body. Coble would not be able to lead the fish from the head; he would have to try to pull the 12-foot-long, 600-pound body sideways through the water.

The black marlin and the boat were both racing down-sea with the fish alongside and to starboard. It was swimming parallel to the cockpit, with its head even with our transom, when Burns stepped in for the tag shot. As he reached out with the 10-foot tag pole, the marlin spurted forward past our stern and hurled itself into the air, out of his reach.

''Don't break it!'' I yelled from the bridge as the marlin launched itself into the air again. Coble bent his knees to keep his body low so he could pull against the steel wire with his full strength. The marlin's leap went up more than out, and Coble, gauging the strain on the wire, continued to hold on. As the marlin went airborne in a high reverse somersault, Burns scuttled around Coble to reach out over the stern to apply the tag. I rapidly shifted from reverse to forward, then applied full throttle.

''Watch your hands!'' I cried as water from the spinning props jetted out from under the stern. It first stopped our reverse momentum, then started accelerating Kingfish forward. The boat was starting to move away from the fish, but although I didn't know it yet Coble's thickly gloved hands were not our greatest concern.

Burns reached far out over the transom and tagged the marlin in the shoulder as it finished the somersault and landed on its side with a huge splash. The video camera shows Burns backing up to get away from the marlin as it instantly jumped again - this time directly toward the boat.

I remember the boat starting to move, but too slowly. The video shows Burns getting caught on the armrest of the chair and being unable to move away from the oncoming fish as it came over the covering board and half into the boat. In the video you can see the bill making contact with Burns' left side. Some people even claim to see a bulge in the back of his shirt in one frame.

I heard a cry that registered at the time as ''got him'' as the fish landed half on the covering board and fell back into the sea. I thought the crew meant the tag was in, and we didn't need to continue with the fish. The boat sped away from the tagged marlin, and Coble hung on and broke the wire. Then I saw Burns clutch his chest, sit on the starboard gunwale and stagger into the salon and out of my sight.

I stuffed the gear levers into the neutral position and leapt from the bridge into the cockpit. I was the first one to reach Burns, who sat on the salon floor, leaning against the portside daybed. He was holding his chest, slightly to the left of center, directly above where most people think the heart lies. Blood stained his shirt and oozed through his fingers.

My heart sank, and I thought to myself, ''Oh God, I talked him into coming with us, and now I've killed him. And his family - what'll they do? I've really done it this time!''

I remember feeling terribly melodramatic as I grabbed his collared polo shirt and ripped it open. I was expecting a huge hole right in the center of his chest, and when I saw a smaller wound over to one side, closer to his armpit, I felt a rush of relief.

The relief was short-lived when I realized that the tissue I could see protruding through the lips of the wound was part of Burns' lung that had been pulled out when the rasplike bill exited after penetrating his upper body. I grabbed half of the torn shirt and wadded it up to hold it over the wound.

''Get me something to make a bandage,'' I said over my shoulder to the others who stood behind me. ''No, not the paper towels. Get a clean sheet and tear it into long strips.''

We made a bandage of a folded section of sheet secured with strips of sheet tied around his chest and made Burns as comfortable as we could. He sat on the salon floor, leaning back against a corner formed by the day berth and the bulkhead. ''Let him rinse his mouth with water,'' I said to the others. ''But don't drink anything, Jim. We're heading for Lizard Island. You're going to be all right.''

The Vietnam War was still in full swing with guys suffering horrible chest wounds every day, and I figured that if we could get Burns to a hospital quickly enough he would be OK. Briefly, I thought about the risk of infection from the material that the fish's bill could have introduced, but reasoned that if Burns lived long enough to have an infection, with modern antibiotics his chances of coming through this were excellent.

I grabbed a chart and ran up into the tower. There was no Loran or GPS in Australia in those days, and no buoys or aids to navigation in these remote waters, but a glance at the chart showed a narrow pass through the outer reef, then several miles of open water with no worry about coral heads. I grabbed the radio and called a Mayday, which was answered immediately, as I throttled up and started to run for help.

Within minutes I had relayed our situation to Bob Dyer, who was fishing much farther south on his Bertram Tennessee II. I planned to head for Lizard Island and asked that the Royal Flying Doctor Service send one of its airplanes to the small dirt landing strip that I had been told existed on the uninhabited island. Confirmation of my message and the successful relay to shore by boats nearer to Cairns brightened the outlook.

I stopped in the calmer, more protected water inside the reef and went below to check on Burns. I unwrapped the blood-soaked bandages to reappraise the damage and relay it to the doctors. Burns tried to sit up, but blood poured from the hole in his chest, and he fell back against the bunk. I was sure that what I could see was lung tissue, but Burns' pulse remained strong, and he was conscious, alert and breathing slowly and steadily. I reapplied the bandages.

''I got through to Bob Dyer, and he relayed it to Cairns,'' I told him. ''The flying doctor has been contacted. You're going to be OK.'' I tried to be more optimistic than I felt and didn't say anything about the punctured lung.

Chapman came into the tower with me and held the chart open in the wind so I could see how to approach the island. I had decided to run the boat up onto the beach if necessary, but we found a small commercial fishing boat in the anchorage and borrowed a dinghy.

We moved Burns off the deck and onto the bunk once we anchored in the calm waters of the lagoon. After talking to him and again checking his pulse, I went ashore and found a caretaker, the sole inhabitant of the island, living in a tent on the beachfront site where a fancy new resort that would become today's Lizard Island Lodge was soon to be built.

The caretaker's radio had the flying doctor frequency, and soon I was talking to a doctor who was already in the air aboard an air ambulance. They would be able to land at Lizard Island in under an hour. ''Take off the bandage and make an airtight covering over the wound. We want to prevent his lung from collapsing if it hasn't already. Plastic cling wrap under a bandage will do,'' the voice said through a background of static. ''Move him ashore, off the boat - we can do surgery on the spot if necessary.''

We decided not to follow these instructions. The inside layers of sheet were soaked with blood, and I was sure our bandage was already airtight. The boat was cleaner than any place on the island, and it was completely still in the anchorage in the island's lee. If there was emergency surgery to be done, we would let the doctor decide if the island was better than the boat.

We waited alongside the dirt strip with a small tractor. When the plane landed we carried a doctor and nurse with two large wooden cases and a stretcher to the beach and ferried them and their equipment to Kingfish.

Quickly and efficiently the team sprang into action. The wooden boxes unfolded into an emergency operating theater, complete with instruments and oxygen. They could have done open-chest surgery on the spot, and my relief at no longer being in charge was enormous! Less than two hours had elapsed since the accident.

After an inspection that revealed a partially collapsed lung, we strapped Burns onto a stretcher and transported him by boat and tractor back to the waiting airplane. After takeoff, the plane flew at almost zero altitude, skimming the waves en route to Cairns. A decrease in atmospheric presure from a high-flying airplane could be fatal.

The pitch dark of a moonless tropical night caught us several miles short of our mothership. I picked my way slowly through the treacherous coral heads with the the aid of a spotlight. When we finally reached safety at Tropic Queen, they yelled across the water that the evening news on the radio had reported Jim Burns was resting comfortably in Cairns Base Hospital in ''good'' condition. Our ordeal was over.

Postscript: Within two weeks, Burns was back at sea running a boat. When we got a chance to talk, I told him I had not wanted him to know how serious I believed his injuries to be as we ran for help. He in turn had thought we did not appreciate how badly he was hurt.

''I had this feeling that if I could keep from coughing and tearing myself up I might make it,'' he said. ''The urge to cough was awful, but I tried to keep breathing steadily.''

The doctors told Burns that the punctured lung was serious, but even more important, the tip of the bill had missed his heart by only millimeters. His heavily muscled chest possibly provided that fraction of an inch that meant the difference between life and death.

Every year, the Royal Flying Doctor Service gets my grateful donation!




Originally Published: October 2001
2004 World Publications, LLC

__________________
================================

Tight Lines
Sheik Mark of Dubai "Sail fish hunter and Vodka drinking champion"


"If you want to Soar with the Eagles, don't surround yourself with Turkey's"
mcharman is offline  
Old 11-01-2004, 12:56 AM
  #8    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Washington DC, Offshore
Posts: 973
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

Watched a Discovery Channel Health piece on bizarre injuries that included a story involving a marlin. A woman brought in a 600 lb Marlin (those always seem to be the dangerous ones, eh?) and had it at boatside. Itgave one final surge right at the boat and drove its spear through her arm and into her chest.

Very long story short they got her back to shore and she started a long slow recovery. The kicker at the end though: They found her breast implant INSIDE her chest cavity, where it had stayed after the Marlin spear pushed it through her ribcage. If not for the silicone padding on the spear she might not be around today...it kept the serrated edges of the weapon from tearing up her lungs and heart.

Time for a new implant though
__________________
Monarch
Topaz 32 Sportfisherman
MI Ben is offline  
Old 11-01-2004, 08:29 AM
  #9    
Senior MemberSponsorCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Central FL, US
Posts: 2,567
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

I have met Peter Wright several times and enjoyed his company for a few cocktails in Bimini and Port Lucuya. He has a lot of great stories and has probably caught more granders than anyone on record. He is a great guy and has some really good advice for being successful while Marlin fishing.

I spoke with him again year before last at the Fishstock tournament (formerly the Daytona Striker) in New Smyrna Beach.

In fact, we caught this Blue shortly after having breakfast with him at Bimini Sands.

__________________

East Coast Trailers is offline  
Old 11-01-2004, 09:32 AM
  #10    
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: West Carolina
Posts: 17,586
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

It doesn't seem that long ago but it was probably 10+ years ago. A 29 year old named Chris Bowie (sp?) was a mate in the Big Rock Blue Marlin Tourney. I am not sure of all the details but they were tagging a blue marlin and he got the wire wrapped around his hand. The fish jumped and pulled him out of the boat. In an effort to save him apparently the angler locked down the drag which broke the line. They never found him.

I remember the day well as we were Spanish fishing and could hear the USCG radio traffic out but not from the boats. We heard enough to know that something was really wrong. When we got in we saw it on the news that night. It was a very sad day. He left behind a wife and a very young child.
Shag is offline  
Old 11-01-2004, 09:51 AM
  #11    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Boston, Ma. & Ft. Lauderdale, Fl.
Posts: 699
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

?
052520 is offline  
Old 11-01-2004, 08:04 PM
  #12    
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Dubai, U.A.E
Posts: 127
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

just watched a video called "cockpit chaos" where a guy get pulled straight out of the boat behind a 1,000lb Marlin off Madeira. Great footage the video is by Nautical Dreams Video , and I bought it two weeks ago from Milton International Tackle on the web, it was made in 1997.
__________________
================================

Tight Lines
Sheik Mark of Dubai "Sail fish hunter and Vodka drinking champion"


"If you want to Soar with the Eagles, don't surround yourself with Turkey's"
mcharman is offline  
Old 11-02-2004, 08:36 AM
  #13    
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Dubai, U.A.E
Posts: 127
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin


From the Washington Post.
By Angus Phillips

Sunday, July 21, 2002; Page D03

When Capt. Billy Verbanas, a well-known Delaware offshore fishing captain at Indian River Inlet, was yanked from his charter boat into 7,000 feet of water by a mako shark and drowned 12 days ago, it called to mind a similar incident off North Carolina in 1994 when billfishing mate Chris Bowie of Lisbon, Md., was pulled overboard by a blue marlin and dragged under, never to be seen again.

Both were skilled professionals who died in the most dangerous phase of big-game fishing, wiring a fish at the end of a fight to bring it close enough to either gaff it and bring it aboard or release it.

In either case, the "wire-man," as he is known, braces thighs against a gunwale, wraps the wire leader around one hand to control the fish and then bends at the waist and reaches overboard with the other to sink the gaff or free the hook.

This moment of eye-to-eye combat at water level is dangerous enough with a white marlin of 50 or 60 pounds, when the wire-man can be whacked or speared by the bill or knocked off balance by a sudden lurch of boat or fish. It's downright scary when the fish outweighs the man and can yank him overboard by brute power, as it appears happened in both these fatal instances.

"It's like a bullfight," said marlin fisherman Carlos Bentos of Ocean City. "It's just you and the beast. Sometimes you get the bad bull who doesn't do what he's supposed to do."

Verbanas, longtime skipper of the Reel-istic and perennial big shark record holder in Delaware, was doubly endangered by the fact he was working on a wild, black, windy night when trouble struck.

He and mate Chris Greigg were hosting a party of Amish anglers from Pennsylvania on an overnight trip near Poorman's Canyon. They hooked the mako at about 11 p.m. and had fought it about an hour when it came close to the boat a third and final time. According to onboard accounts, Verbanas grabbed the wire leader, wrapped it twice around a gloved hand as is customary and instructed one of the anglers to shoot the fish with a rifle as he pulled its head up.

But the fish instead leaped and gave a mighty tug that plucked Verbanas, a strapping, 41-year-old father of six, off the boat and into the water before he could utter a sound. With the deck pitching in 30-knot winds and seven- to eight-foot seas, unstable footing doubtless contributed to the reversal.

"He didn't do anything wrong," said Bill Baker, a fellow offshore captain and owner of Bill's Sports Store, the Delmarva supplier where for years Verbanas had outfitted his boat. "Sometimes, things like that just happen."

Something similar happened to Bowie, the victim in the North Carolina incident eight years ago. When the 200-pound blue marlin he was wiring leaped next to the boat and made a 180-degree turn in midair, he was unable to extricate his hands from the tangled wire. As skipper Alan Fields and a fishing party on the boat Trophy Box looked on in horror on a calm, clear day, the Howard County man was dragged into the clear depths and vanished from sight.

Verbanas also was dragged under but broke free and popped to the surface within a minute or so, according to Nate Beiler, one of the fishermen aboard.

"Capt. Billy surfaced about 150, 200 feet from the boat and he hollered to Captain Chris [mate Chris Greigg], 'Start the motors!' " wrote Beiler in an e-mail account of the ensuing struggle.

"The wind was howling and Captain Chris jockeyed the boat near to Billy and we threw the life ring to him but it just blew away. At that point my friend Mike stripped his clothes and dove into the water with no regard to his own safety or thoughts of the shark nearby. The seas were now seven to eight feet and we saw Billy watching when his head just went under. Mike had him within seconds and we hauled him into the boat and began CPR."

"All six of us took turns pumping; for two hours we never gave up."

But it was to no avail. A Coast Guard helicopter summoned by radio eventually arrived to airlift the body to shore, but Verbanas was gone.



__________________
================================

Tight Lines
Sheik Mark of Dubai "Sail fish hunter and Vodka drinking champion"


"If you want to Soar with the Eagles, don't surround yourself with Turkey's"
mcharman is offline  
Old 11-02-2004, 09:02 AM
  #14    
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: West Carolina
Posts: 17,586
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

There is a film of Chris Bowie being dragged overboard but apparently only the boat owner, the tournament committee, and the members of the NC Marine Fisheries Committee were the only ones to see it. They refused to let it go public even though I am sure they were offered good money for it. To me that showed a lot of class and compassion.
Shag is offline  
Old 11-02-2004, 04:45 PM
  #15    
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Dubai, U.A.E
Posts: 127
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

I agree, As tragic as these stories are, they are interesting and sometimes lessons can be learnt. I wll always carry a line cutter around my neck whenever I go bill fishing or tuna or shark fishing, ahh hell, I'm just always going to wear a line cutter whenever I step foot on a boat from now on.
__________________
================================

Tight Lines
Sheik Mark of Dubai "Sail fish hunter and Vodka drinking champion"


"If you want to Soar with the Eagles, don't surround yourself with Turkey's"
mcharman is offline  
Old 11-02-2004, 05:50 PM
  #16    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location:
Posts: 105
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

CHRIS BOWIE WENT TO GLENELG HIGH SCHOOL WHERE I GRADUATED IN 99. I NEVER HAD THE PLEASURE OF KNOWING HIM BUT EVERYDAY I WALKED TO SHOP CLASS I SAW HIS TRIBUTE PLAQUE. I HAD ALWAYS UNDERSTOOD HIS PASSION FOR FISHING AS IT WAS ALSO MINE. FROM TALKING TO MY TEACHERS HE WAS ONE HELL OF A GUY.
__________________

33trojan is offline  
Old 11-06-2004, 02:48 PM
  #17    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: New Orleans,La. U.S.
Posts: 178
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

Here in louisiana a couple of years back,the crew of a sportfishing boat caught a small 50-70lbs white marlin,the way I understand it the fish was muscled in very quickly on heavy tackle,at the side of the boat as the wireman leaned over the small fish jumped basically straight up,the bill went in his mouth,into the roof of his mouth and kept going,at first he thought he was fine the bleeding started to stop rather quickly,and every one kind of calmed down a little,after a short period of time his neck began to get very stiff,so they took him to the nearest oil platform and called for a helicopter,when they got him to the hospital the surgeons found a sliver of the fishes bill had boken off in his spine,within millimeters of his spinal cord,just goes to show you even the small ones can be deadly!
fishhunter is offline  
Old 11-07-2004, 10:26 PM
  #18    
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location:
Posts: 215
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

Awesome. And scary for those who work the cockpit.
shortwave is offline  
Old 11-08-2004, 08:18 AM
  #19    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: NC
Posts: 1,032
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

I am the wireman in the big marlin tournaments I fish and love doing it. But you better believe I wear one of the safety line cutters, make sure there are bolt cutters on the boat for cutting 3x hooks, and my wiring gloves are welder's gloves that I have had the seams cut and enough material taken out so the gloves are real snug on my forearms.

Although it is a little easier these days with wind ons and mono vs. 20 or so feet of 19 wire, a lot of common problems still happen when wire or mono gets caught because the glove bunches up.

I have had a lot of near misses and only one mishap, and that was entirely my fault due to complacency, as wiring a sail in the winter with no gloves and it proceeded to shoot straight up and run it's bill through my hand. It could be your first time on the wire or it could be your thousandth fish with the most careful crew in the world...... you just never know when something is going to go wrong. I feel for all those guy's families.


Keep your thumbs pointed together out there,
Tom.



Tom Bare is offline  
Old 11-11-2004, 05:37 PM
  #20    
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Bluewater 2350
Posts: 1,384
Default RE: Man killed by Marlin

George Poveromo got creamed by a flying sailfish once. I won't say where though , Required a trip to the hospital.
Mako Madness is offline  
 
 
Closed Thread

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The real truth on marlin and billfish killed fishcop SportFishing and Charters Forum 16 08-26-2008 02:43 AM
Man killed on job prockvoan Dockside Chat 17 11-20-2007 11:54 AM
Fla man spears 480lb marlin eb1326 SportFishing and Charters Forum 44 12-21-2006 11:19 AM
Man loses swordfight with Marlin.... WATERDOG91 SportFishing and Charters Forum 4 07-24-2006 06:21 PM
Man speared by 800 pound Marlin kingair Dockside Chat 2 07-24-2006 04:43 PM

 



©2009 TheHullTruth.com

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0