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Old 01-10-2009, 01:56 PM   #1
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Default YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

with yellowfin season soon approaching...i wanted to start a thread to get tips and techniques from those of you who are seasoned veterans at the art of yellowfin fishing ....so i'm gonna throw a couple of questions out there and please feel free to add whatever you think might help...btw...i will be attending the ED DWYER Seminar coming up soon !!
1. What pound fluorocarbon do you use? Which make of fluro do you like ...Seaguar? Yozuri? Blackwater? How long are your leaders? Do you crimp the lines or use a double overhand knot ?

2. Which lures do you guys like best? todds? ilanders? marauders? bluewater? calcutta?

3. how fast do you guys troll when trolling artificials?

4. do you guys troll lures w/ rigged ballyhoo? which do you prefer artificals / or artificials with meat?

5. How far behind the boat do you troll the lines? 100yds, 200? 300? what would make you pull the lures in closer?

6. How about live baiting ? do you do that often? or chucking? how often are these techniques used? why would you live bait or chunk?

7. Tackle: 30w? 50w? what strength mono mainline on your reels? 50? 60? 80? MOMOI ? STREN? clear? hi viz?


ive search many forums for techniques but havent' found anything that answers these questions....

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Old 01-10-2009, 02:30 PM   #2
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Default RE: YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

Please take a look at some of the articles I've written on this at the attached link.

Particularily Spring Training - Rally the School - Science of Fishing

Alot of these questions are answered there. Email anytime as well.

http://www.canyonrunner.com/articles.php
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Old 01-10-2009, 03:50 PM   #3
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Default RE: YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

thanks capt. ! pm sent
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Old 01-10-2009, 04:12 PM   #4
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Default Re: YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

I use 80# seaguar fluro on a 8' leader, momoi fishing line, TLD 25's, tiagra 30W's and 50w's, and crimps where I can. I like Bluewater candy seawitches and jag heads the best, with illanders coming in next, all over a rigged ballyhoo. Instead of wiring the hoo to the hook, I like to use springs on a pin rig. I'll also troll a spreader bar way , way, way back on my center rigger or put a daisy chain either way back or in close, and stagger the other baits where I can turn without tangles. I also have them staggered where if they don't like a certain rig that I have in the water, another one will come over their heads as they turn off the first one. We generally troll at 6-8 mph. Hope this helps. Main thing to remember is, tuna are very leader shy, and they will test every componet on your rig. Good luck
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Old 01-10-2009, 04:20 PM   #5
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Default Re: YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

i can smell the tuna already
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Old 01-10-2009, 04:41 PM   #6
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Default RE: YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

I've moved across country and don't fish the otherside anymore but I wouldn't go without a couple of Marauders or Yo Zuri Bonitos behind the boat. We had trips where all we were catching were little yellowfins and blackfins, dropped a Marauder back and got big(80-120#) fish. On those same schools we still got little fish on the cedar plugs and feathers.
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Old 01-10-2009, 05:04 PM   #7
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Default RE: YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

I used to use flourocarbon leaders. Not anymore. About 6 years ago went on an overnight trip to a floater (semi-sbmersible oil rig). Moon was full and the rig was obviously in the middel of a problem or a turn around because they burned the flare full blast all night. The water was slick as glass and between the 100+ foot flame from the flare and the full moon, it was like daylight. We chummed up a school of 60-80 lb yellowfin right under the boat. We could watch them take the bait and run. What we were doing was cutting up a pogie (menhaden), sticking a hook in one piece and tossing the whole handful over the side. Then just watch to see which tuna grabed the one with the hook in it. What I found out after watching this show for hours was that it didn't matter if you had a flourocarbon leader, a wire leader or no leader at all, the fish would take it and run. But if your hook was too heavy and the chunk of meat witht that hook in it sank too fast... forget it. They wouldn't touch it. They'd gobble down every other chunk in the water, but they wouldn't even come near the one that sank too fast. I now just tie my hooks straight to the 80 # test on my reel and neer have a problem. Pic from the haul that day.

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Old 01-10-2009, 05:25 PM   #8
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Default RE: YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

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Back-in-Black - 1/10/2009 5:04 PM
But if your hook was too heavy and the chunk of meat witht that hook in it sank too fast... forget it. They wouldn't touch it. They'd gobble down every other chunk in the water, but they wouldn't even come near the one that sank too fast.

I want to share with you about how this same thing happened in the Keys when we were Yellowtailing one day. We would have them right in sight behind the boat, in the chumslick, but we had our hooks tied to leaders that were tied to "swivels" to stop the line from twisting when you reeled back in. They would run RIGHT UP to the baits and stop dead in their track, like they were sniffing the bait or looking at it and then turn and run for a piece of chum.

As soon as we removed the swivels and tied our lines straight to the hooks, the baits "flowed" in the chumslick and we nailed them all day long!

And unfortunately, I most certainly don't have a pic of the days fishing like you do. What an AWESOME haul you guys had that day!
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Old 01-10-2009, 05:48 PM   #9
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Default RE: YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

Quote:
Back-in-Black - 1/10/2009 8:04 PMI used to use flourocarbon leaders. Not anymore. About 6 years ago went on an overnight trip to a floater (semi-sbmersible oil rig). Moon was full and the rig was obviously in the middel of a problem or a turn around because they burned the flare full blast all night. The water was slick as glass and between the 100+ foot flame from the flare and the full moon, it was like daylight. We chummed up a school of 60-80 lb yellowfin right under the boat. We could watch them take the bait and run. What we were doing was cutting up a pogie (menhaden), sticking a hook in one piece and tossing the whole handful over the side. Then just watch to see which tuna grabed the one with the hook in it. What I found out after watching this show for hours was that it didn't matter if you had a flourocarbon leader, a wire leader or no leader at all, the fish would take it and run. But if your hook was too heavy and the chunk of meat witht that hook in it sank too fast... forget it. They wouldn't touch it. They'd gobble down every other chunk in the water, but they wouldn't even come near the one that sank too fast. I now just tie my hooks straight to the 80 # test on my reel and neer have a problem. Pic from the haul that day.
My $.02 on the chumming with FC or straight to the hook: What you saw happen with FC is very common FC is much denser than regular mono throw in a swivel and the leader and bait will sink much faster than a bait rigged on mono straight to the hook. Also the FC is stiffer than allot of mono especially jinkai. The way we get around the the first problem is to stuff the baits full of styrofoam that makes up for the swivel and FC also use the spro swivels they are very small. Once you have the bait at the same rate of decent as the chunks to fix the stiffness you need to make sure that you have allot of extra line in the water so there is no drag on the bait at all. If you have fish in back of the boat also try to throw the chunks so the fish are swimming in the shadow of the boat, that little bit of darkness makes it allot harder for them to see the fishing line.

If you are fishing for 60-80lb yft and they willeat straight 80lb mono use that it's allot less work and money. You probably won't lose a fish we fished that way for years, and still do, just don't leader the fish have the angle pump the fish straight to the gaff.
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Old 01-10-2009, 07:08 PM   #10
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Default RE: YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

thanks guys !! keep it coming.....great tips on the chunking with the hooks tied to the mono !!
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Old 01-11-2009, 12:14 PM   #11
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Default RE: YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

BIB, quite a trip to GC you had there.... Funny how one day you can do no worng and others no right. You're right in how the chunk drifts with the chum but using lighter leaders will get you bit more often than always going straight 80. I'll admit straight 80 will do it more times than not but on those days where 5 bites could make all the difference in the world, you've got to start big and work down till you get bit.... GC notwithstanding, the fishing there is unfreakinbelievable a lot of the time. Fish more pressured areas though....

My fav is starting with those tiny 80lb Spro barrel swivels to eliminate twist with as long a leader as you can use to wire your fish. Chunking works as long as the boat can move in some fashion. If there's no wind and no current, chunking will rarely catch a fish IMO. Granted those days are rare but when that's what your faced with its either move or catch live flyers.... Live flyers will catch when absolutely nothing else will go right... Of course I can only catch them at night but you get the idea... Just another tip...
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Old 01-11-2009, 01:14 PM   #12
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Default RE: YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

About the only fishing I live for any more is heading over to the other side out of Sebastian Inlet. The best thing you can do is hook up with someone for 1-2 trips to learn the ropes. There's so much more you can learn that way versus the forums. Ed Dwyer's spring seminar is also a good primer on the subject.

So, I'll offer you a few things I've learned, especially since you're on the east coast of Florida.[*]Afternoon bite seems to be better. At sunup, it's rare for me to load up with tuna. Early bites are skippies, blackfin, dolphin, wahoo and sharks that are hungry. Toward the end of the day when we run back in, it's common to blow past 100 lb YFT greyhounding after bait. This means I can leave at sunup and arrive 9am'ish, but try to stay late for an evening return to port.[*]The two lures that work best for me are dark colored 6" Todd's lures and Braid Speedsters. If I could get away with it, I'd run nothing but speedsters but I can't do that off of the outriggers. This season I'm going to experiment with small Williams feathers when I can't get a hookup (baitfish can be really small).[*]I've pulled countless hooks on YFT, so use double hook rigs when you can. Despite popular opinion, you don't have to cross their eyes with 15 lbs of drag at hook up. You want just enough drag to keep the line tight. Remember, all that mono is one big spring out there holding tension on the fish.[*]Don't be afraid to tie your line directly to the leader. I use 60 lb main line clear mono tied to 25' of 80-100 lb mono leader. At the end of the leader, I'll have a *small* snap swivel. Each trolling lure is rigged with a double-hook rig and a heavy piece of mono or cable that extends from the lure 3-6" into a crimped loop. This connects to the swivel. My rationale for the short heavy line at the lure is to help prevent chew-throughs, and if there are wahoo around the cable gives you a chance of landing him to prevent bite offs. Most of the time the wahoo simply wait for a YFT to get hooked up before biting it in half.[*]Reels are Tiagra LSRA 30W and 50W models. Looking back, a 30W is all I really need. 50W's get too heavy after a long day of reeling in fish.[*]As for setting lines behind the boat, I've gotten hook ups 15' off the transom (scares the poop out of me). But generally I want my lines 75-100 yds behind the boat in a staggered pattern. Some folks say further back. The problem is most crews can't accurately judge how far back each line is, and the lures can be scattered all over the place. That works against you. You want your lures closer together to increase the loading up of all of your lines. One tip I'm going to try this season is to use a line counter and mark each line using floss. Speedsters off the flatlines at 100 and 110 yds, trollers off the riggers at 115 yds each. No idea on the distance (+/-), but this will make setting lines a lot easier for the crews.[*]As for distance, this other boat crew advocates something like 200-250 yds. That's why they use line counters b/c they can't see that far back. It allows them to more easily drag the baits right through the school. I might mark off my lines at both distances and give it a shot. But that far back, I may have to increase the drag to account for line stretch. Will have to see.[*]And of course, you know not to run your boat through the bird packs and cause the school to sound. In general, your first pass will be your best pass.[/list]That's enough for now. If you start catching fish and get a few of them that sound on you that you can't get up, get in touch with me or read up on how to plane fish to the surface. Using this technique, we can boat 80 lb YFT's in less than 15 minutes every time.
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Old 01-11-2009, 02:09 PM   #13
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Default RE: YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

Quote:
Mr.Chummer - 1/11/2009 4:14 PM



About the only fishing I live for any more is heading over to the other side out of Sebastian Inlet. The best thing you can do is hook up with someone for 1-2 trips to learn the ropes. There's so much more you can learn that way versus the forums. Ed Dwyer's spring seminar is also a good primer on the subject.

So, I'll offer you a few things I've learned, especially since you're on the east coast of Florida.[*]Afternoon bite seems to be better. At sunup, it's rare for me to load up with tuna. Early bites are skippies, blackfin, dolphin, wahoo and sharks that are hungry. Toward the end of the day when we run back in, it's common to blow past 100 lb YFT greyhounding after bait. This means I can leave at sunup and arrive 9am'ish, but try to stay late for an evening return to port.[*]The two lures that work best for me are dark colored 6" Todd's lures and Braid Speedsters. If I could get away with it, I'd run nothing but speedsters but I can't do that off of the outriggers. This season I'm going to experiment with small Williams feathers when I can't get a hookup (baitfish can be really small).[*]I've pulled countless hooks on YFT, so use double hook rigs when you can. Despite popular opinion, you don't have to cross their eyes with 15 lbs of drag at hook up. You want just enough drag to keep the line tight. Remember, all that mono is one big spring out there holding tension on the fish.[*]Don't be afraid to tie your line directly to the leader. I use 60 lb main line clear mono tied to 25' of 80-100 lb mono leader. At the end of the leader, I'll have a *small* snap swivel. Each trolling lure is rigged with a double-hook rig and a heavy piece of mono or cable that extends from the lure 3-6" into a crimped loop. This connects to the swivel. My rationale for the short heavy line at the lure is to help prevent chew-throughs, and if there are wahoo around the cable gives you a chance of landing him to prevent bite offs. Most of the time the wahoo simply wait for a YFT to get hooked up before biting it in half.[*]Reels are Tiagra LSRA 30W and 50W models. Looking back, a 30W is all I really need. 50W's get too heavy after a long day of reeling in fish.[*]As for setting lines behind the boat, I've gotten hook ups 15' off the transom (scares the poop out of me). But generally I want my lines 75-100 yds behind the boat in a staggered pattern. Some folks say further back. The problem is most crews can't accurately judge how far back each line is, and the lures can be scattered all over the place. That works against you. You want your lures closer together to increase the loading up of all of your lines. One tip I'm going to try this season is to use a line counter and mark each line using floss. Speedsters off the flatlines at 100 and 110 yds, trollers off the riggers at 115 yds each. No idea on the distance (+/-), but this will make setting lines a lot easier for the crews.[*]As for distance, this other boat crew advocates something like 200-250 yds. That's why they use line counters b/c they can't see that far back. It allows them to more easily drag the baits right through the school. I might mark off my lines at both distances and give it a shot. But that far back, I may have to increase the drag to account for line stretch. Will have to see.[*]And of course, you know not to run your boat through the bird packs and cause the school to sound. In general, your first pass will be your best pass.[/list]That's enough for now. If you start catching fish and get a few of them that sound on you that you can't get up, get in touch with me or read up on how to plane fish to the surface. Using this technique, we can boat 80 lb YFT's in less than 15 minutes every time.
Mr. Chummer,
Nice feedback. Do you usually run to the buoy or just to the other side? Would like to hear about how you raise the YF after they sound.
Thanks
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Old 01-11-2009, 02:41 PM   #14
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Default Re: YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

When trolling keep your spread tighter than you normally would if you want to target just Yellowfin's. You want your spread to look like a pod of bait, not just a bait then another bait 50 or 100 foot away. It helps to intice them up when they see 5 or 6 baits closer together, and most of the time you are going to have multiple YF hook ups when trolling instead of a random one here or there. I use 80 segaur fluro when I am strictly targeting YF's and here in NC we seem to have the best luck with seawitches in front of med. ballyhoo. I always run a spreader bar way back in the middle, usually a green machine bar. As for as crimps go, I crimp anything 80 lbs. and up, its easy and makes for smaller connection, also I try to use and a spro 130 inline swivel, it is much smaller than a snap swivel and is less likely to spook finicky fish. For reels, 30w's work perfect but I usually have a couple 50's mixed in too, 30's have 60 pound momoi and 50's are rigged with 130 hollow core with 130 lbs. mono top shot (overkill for yellowfin tuna though). Good luck this season.
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Old 01-11-2009, 03:42 PM   #15
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Default RE: YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

Quote:
geaux001 - 1/11/2009 2:14 PM

BIB, quite a trip to GC you had there.... Funny how one day you can do no worng and others no right. You're right in how the chunk drifts with the chum but using lighter leaders will get you bit more often than always going straight 80. I'll admit straight 80 will do it more times than not but on those days where 5 bites could make all the difference in the world, you've got to start big and work down till you get bit.... GC notwithstanding, the fishing there is unfreakinbelievable a lot of the time. Fish more pressured areas though....

My fav is starting with those tiny 80lb Spro barrel swivels to eliminate twist with as long a leader as you can use to wire your fish. Chunking works as long as the boat can move in some fashion. If there's no wind and no current, chunking will rarely catch a fish IMO. Granted those days are rare but when that's what your faced with its either move or catch live flyers.... Live flyers will catch when absolutely nothing else will go right... Of course I can only catch them at night but you get the idea... Just another tip...
Geaux, some good points you make. One thing I will debate though is the moving boat part. I didn't mention it in my first post because I did not think it was relavant to the issue. But now... We pulled up to the rig that afternoon right at dark, turned off the motors and started fishing, And we fished and fished and fished for probably 5-6 hrs. Never once had to start the motors to reposition the boat---- because we weren't moving. Full moon and all. When I had originally stopped the boat when we got there, we were only about 20' from the rig. Usually we stay farther away because of the baracudas... stinky bastards. Anyway, it was one of the weirdest things I ever experienced 90+ miles offshore. To be able to sit 20' away from a rig for hours on end and never have to worry about banging into the rig or getting too far away from it. Our normal technique is to set up drifts with the current and the wind pushing us past one side or another of the rig and then, when we get too far past it, we will crank back up and set up another drift. I've also been out there when the current was so strong we could never turn the motors off. We backed up to the rig and bumped the motors in and out of gear all night to maintain position.

Anyway, point of the original post was that I learned a lot that trip (and every trip, truth to tell), and much of what I learned contradicted all accepted wisdom on the subject. Don't be afraid to try new stuff---it just might work.
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Old 01-11-2009, 08:28 PM   #16
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Default RE: YELLOWFIN TUNA TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

Quote:
skiphughes - 1/11/2009 5:09 PM
Mr. Chummer, Nice feedback. Do you usually run to the buoy or just to the other side? Would like to hear about how you raise the YF after they sound. Thanks
I usually leave the buoy alone b/c you don't have to travel that far, not to mention it gets a lot of attention. It's not unusual to head over to it and find another boat working the area. It's uncool to be anywhere near another boat chasing tuna over there, although I guess some captains work something out where everyone trolls around it. Here's my 'been there, done that' picture. BTW, if you go there you might find a lot of bait around the buoy that can be sabikied or line caught. Saw a bunch of rainbow runners there once.




Not sure if you're asking about how to raise a school after it sounds or a particular tuna that's tied on. When the school goes deep, it's time to leave and find another school (aka run and gun).

If a big fish sounds and it's heavy enough, you may get into a winching fight. Most folks will stop the boat, put the rod into a holder, kick the reel into low gear and try to winch the fish up. Most of the time the fish comes up a little bit and then rips drag back down. We got into this about a dozen times early in 2006. These kinds of fights usually end the same way - chewed through line, pulled hooks or just a big giant head after a shark/wahoo showed up. You can try sizing up your main line/leader to win future fights, but it's not necessary.

I read that some captains (marlin chasers in particular) will plane a big fish to the surface, especially if they exhaust themselves and die. Before leaving the dock, they set their strike/max drag to 1/3 of their main line test. It's been my experience that with 50 lb main line, 50/3 = 17 lbs drag is barely enough. I run 60 lb main and set my max drag at 20 lbs. So why do this? Well, when the fish heads deep, put the reel in a holder, move the drag up to max and then start moving the boat straight or in a slow circle. Tow the fish just fast enough to pay line out, which = 20 lbs of force. Yes, the reel is paying out line. Yes, the angler is pissed b/c he's gotta reel it all back in. But what happens is that most fish can't resist 20 lbs of drag pulling him at an angle toward the surface. Eventually, the fish will raise closer to the surface. Tighten up your turn just enough to take line back. Too little pressure and the fish will head back down. Keep repeating this and you'll eventually get your line back with the fish tired out and on the surface.

After I learned this trick, I never lost a fish due to sounding and the fights always ended much sooner. Once down off of Freeport, we got a triple hookup with one of the fish being this big monster. Dragged the other two tuna into the boat and got into the fight with the heavy weight. The angler spent an hour trying to do it his way, doing the pump and wind thing. Fish went deep and stayed there. Started planing the fish to the surface and half an hour later we got him up. We got the 25' of 100 lb wind-on leader to the rod tip. Got the gaffs ready, started taking more line in and the fish turned out to be a huge bull shark. We didn't bother to tape the length b/c he was still pretty pissed and I didn't want him to bite my gelcoat. While I leadered his head on one side of the boat, his tail was under and clearly showing on the other side. With an 8'6" beam, we think he was 9 or 10' long. Estimated his girth from guessing how far I could wrap my arms around him, and the calculations said the fish was in the 800 lb range. I don't believe it, but I'll settle for 400 lbs. So if I can plane up a healthy and thrashing 400 lb shark, the technique works for big fish. Also proved I didn't need any leaders heavier than 100 lbs. Cut the leader and let him go with my brand new black Braid Speedster hanging out the side of his mouth.


Sorry for the long post, but I think you guys wanted to get the detail on how this works. Would be interested in hearing how other captains do it, but most folks I know keep the boat moving in a fight.


Here are some pics of fish landed from planing. These two 70 lb YFT hit the deck in 10 minutes, 60 lb main lines on Tiagra LSRA 30W's.




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Old 08-25-2015, 11:41 PM   #17
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Default Help with spread bars

Hey ,
I'm new with spread and trolling, I prefer to casting and jigging .
But I would like to learn more about them , I always like to have the plan b,c,d.I have a lot of doubts.i ll very be glad if you answer my questions.
The spread bar are they really good for tuna 30-150 kg ?
I got Williamson ballyhoo spread bar .Is it good ?i never used it .
I'm think to buy or make one .
Which size is better for big yellowfin? how many lures do you put in yours ?
One friend can make one bar with lures 12 inches, is it to big ? He ll make with Pakula rat. He ll make a very good price for it(he gave 70% of discount for this lure)
Can you give me your email or Facebook, so we can talke?
Best regards and sorry if I was inconvenience
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