The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum

Go Back   >
Search


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-13-2017, 09:28 AM   #1
Admirals Club
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 584
Default Analog to NMEA 2000 Converter - RS11

I purchased a Garmina 94sv which I will be installing this spring along with a 2008 Honda 150. This is the year before Honda's were NMEA 2000 compatible so I've been reading about the RS-11 and other converters that will allow my Garmin to display the Honda engine data (RPM, fuel flow, etc...).

Is this even possible with what I have mentioned? The console I have is very small so I'd like to preserve the space I've got and maintain a "clean" look by eliminating the need for engine gauges.

Any help appreciated...
TunaTeaser1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2017, 06:16 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,551
Default

there have been a few threads here, search and you will find them

this is one I recall:

Converting analog gauges to NMEA2000: AlbaCombi hands-on
Fwpratt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2017, 07:51 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 262
Default

I too, am gauge less due to having such a small console area. I am using the RS-11 for about 2 years now and it has worked well with my Garmin. I am using the tach and temp from a Merc OB and fuel level from my boat last tank sending unit and I just added a water pressure transducer. Not exactly "plug n play". It comes with a rather basic set up software that allow you to configure each input. The tach input allow you to select the number of pulses. Probably took me most of a day to get everything working right. Once it is set up, it is pretty cool to be able to make tweaks to the readings to get them just right rather than having to just get used to whatever reading you have. The wires coming into it are the ones that would be going to the gauge from the sending unit.
Name:  IMG_0148.jpg
Views: 191
Size:  198.8 KB
Name:  IMG_0425.jpg
Views: 193
Size:  277.8 KB
Name:  IMG_0424.jpg
Views: 190
Size:  304.5 KB
Name:  IMG_0431.jpg
Views: 190
Size:  246.6 KB

Last edited by spearfish III; 03-19-2017 at 08:53 PM.
spearfish III is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2017, 04:28 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Nelson, New Zealand
Posts: 751
Default

Interesting thread.

I'm thinking about an analogue to NMEA converter for my twin outboards (2S carb'd Johnson's).
[Edit: Forgot to include my engines have a 6-pulse tach signal]

I would retain the system check and hours gauges but replace everything else with the NMEA2000

Can anyone comment on whether the RS11 or Alba-Combi would be suitable. Inherently the Alba looks well set up for twin engines.
MikeAqua is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2017, 06:18 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 262
Default

I can't speak to the Alba. I went with the RS11 after doing due diligence and finding that it was the best value for me. It does discuss using it for twin engines in the manual. If you look at the picture above of the set up screen, you will see that it has 2 tach inputs and you must select "port or starboard" for each parameter. My Merc also is a 6 pulse tach which you can also see. The biggest issue I see is that it only has 2 tach inputs and 6 monitoring inputs and only 4 of them can be phantom powered by the RS11, meaning the other 2 must send a voltage to the RS 11 such as in the case of my new pressure transducer which has its own power supply and it sends a voltage whereas sending units like the temp and fuel senders are just resistors so the RS must send a signal to them to get a measurement. I believe they also state in the manual that you can also connect more than 1 RS11 to your NEMA backbone.
spearfish III is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2017, 06:58 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Nelson, New Zealand
Posts: 751
Default

Thanks for your reply spearfish. I need RPM plus another 7 inputs so the MD33 by the same manufacturer as the RS11 might do the trick.
MikeAqua is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2017, 08:15 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 262
Default

Might take a look here also. They show a 2 pack of RS11 for $530

https://www.navstore.com/noland-engi...verter-en.html
spearfish III is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2017, 09:43 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Nelson, New Zealand
Posts: 751
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by spearfish III View Post
Might take a look here also. They show a 2 pack of RS11 for $530

https://www.navstore.com/noland-engi...verter-en.html
That looks better actually (and cheaper!).
MikeAqua is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2017, 07:33 AM   #9
Admirals Club
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 584
Default

Thanks for the responses. This is all very new to me.

Spear, I'll have to buy a Honda wiring harness, so once I have that I'll essentially be plugging those wires from the motor straight into the RS-11? Assuming I'll have to map out which wires go into each port, then hook the unit up to a computer to run the software on it before connecting to the NMEA backbone? Let me know if I'm missing any steps here.

How difficult would it be for a novice to program the unit correctly for it to display on the Garmin?
TunaTeaser1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2017, 12:34 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 262
Default

I am not that familiar with Honda but if you have gauges already then you have the wires that you need already. The sending unit wire that goes to the gauge is what goes to the converter. As far as using the software goes, you need a little bit of computer knowledge but not a lot . Basically say for instance your oil pressure sending unit sends one reading at zero oil pressure and another reading at normal running oil pressure those readings are the two values you enter into the software and it programs the converter if that makes any sense .
spearfish III is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2017, 08:18 AM   #11
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 19
Default

I have the Alba-Combi unit and have been using it for about a year now.

If you have an Ethernet network on the boat adding the AC unit is as simple as plugging it into the network. The handy feature of this device is that it is completely programmed via a web interface from a browser (it like Chrome best but Firefox works). I have mine attached to the Ethernet network that also includes WiFi and N2K backbone, Means I can access it via my laptop or mobile and see the gauges real time on these devices.

Where the AC is lacking is the setup manual. In short, it SUCKS!!! The developers have some configuration templates enabled for European standard gauges. For my boat (with twin Cummins engines) none of the templates for RPM, Temp, Oil, Fuel etc worked and I've had to manually configure all of them. I believe this is where the Noland or Actisense products are better and in fact, I've used their manuals to help me to program the AC. I've sent multiple emails to AC support and they've never responded.

But, if you don't mind the research and experimentation, the unit is simple to program and works well for a twin engine application. You can connect either directly to a sender or take a feed off the back of an analogue gauge (which is nice for redundancy).

It would be very handy for anyone installing any of the AC, Actisense or Noland if there was some sort of a reference chart or spreadsheet for different sender values. Does anyone know if that sort of table exists?
TenMile is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2017, 05:26 AM   #12
Admirals Club
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 204
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TenMile View Post
It would be very handy for anyone installing any of the AC, Actisense or Noland if there was some sort of a reference chart or spreadsheet for different sender values. Does anyone know if that sort of table exists?
When I was considering an analog/NEMA 2000 interface I found http://www.chetcodigital.com/. I was concerned about calibration and they have data for their units. I'm not sure if that will work with the other units but have found them to be responsive and genuinely interested in helping me.
stephansloan@msn.com is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 08:40 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 262
Default

The Nolan set up program reads the values from the sender every few seconds. I basically used those readings and assigned them to the low value (such as 0 psi) while engine was off and I used the old gauge to assign the running value to (such as 10 psi). For the temp I used the Nolan reading cold and entered the temp of the block using a non-contact temp gauge then warmed it up and entered the Nolan reading along with the temp. Make sense? The good part is that you can fine tune the readings if you find they are off a bit. Mostly the important part is monitoring a change in trend anyway. IMHO.
spearfish III is online now   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 09:56 PM   #14
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 19
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by spearfish III View Post
The Nolan set up program reads the values from the sender every few seconds. I basically used those readings and assigned them to the low value (such as 0 psi) while engine was off and I used the old gauge to assign the running value to (such as 10 psi). For the temp I used the Nolan reading cold and entered the temp of the block using a non-contact temp gauge then warmed it up and entered the Nolan reading along with the temp. Make sense? The good part is that you can fine tune the readings if you find they are off a bit. Mostly the important part is monitoring a change in trend anyway. IMHO.
Yeah, the AC unit does the same. You can measure the reading off the sender or the electrical reading off a gauge depending on how you set it up and then basically create your own curve. It's easier for senders that have a linear reading (e.g. RPM or Fuel) basically you can take a reading at 0 and a reading at 100% and call it good -- temperature and pressure senders are tricky as their readings plot to a curve -- I'd have to go back to my Statistics 101 course to remember how to figure out the function to plot the curve properly. Where it's tricky is readings that I will *hopefully* never see e.g. how to I figure out what the reading of 200F will be, or 90 PSI that sort of thing where'd you would not normally measure/
TenMile is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:28 PM.


©2009 TheHullTruth.com

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.9.3.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.