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Old 05-16-2010, 06:50 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edd View Post
Hundreds of boats huh....why? Rig how you like. If you like your junk looking very amateurish then wire with extension cords. If your boat is worth enough to insure, you may want to check with your company to see if they will cover a loss when wired this way. It appears senseless to suggest a basic Marine Wiring Fundamentals book at this point. And if you're wiring your friends boats this way, you're doing them NO favors.
When a person gets in the habit of doing things on the cheap, those bad habits will follow them (100's of boats) for a long time. Maybe one day you will buy something expensive and you're going to wire things the same way. Well....maybe you already have.

Wire it how you like.

Edd
You still haven't explained the problem. As long as your not using junk extension cord there's no problem. If there is a loss/fire due to wiring, it will be due to chafing, incorrect routing, or incorrect gauge not because of the wire used was an extension cord.
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Old 05-17-2010, 10:01 AM   #22
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You still haven't explained the problem. As long as your not using junk extension cord there's no problem. If there is a loss/fire due to wiring, it will be due to chafing, incorrect routing, or incorrect gauge not because of the wire used was an extension cord.
You can look at it this way.......If you were buying the boat and had it surveyed, the Surveyor would make note of the extension cord wiring as 'sub-par'. Here's the thing. If you can find it accepted in any of the marine wiring guide books, then it's OK. Oh...about chafing or incorrect routing of wire....if your Adjuster can trace the fire back to NON-approved marine wiring he probably won't allow the claim.

Will the extension cord supply power to your electronics? Yes it will.

And note this; since Lowrance makes no suggestion to type of wire the installer should use, you could assume that the outdoor household extension cord will suffice. Even-though the wires they have supplied the consumer with are indeed tinned marine grade wires.

So...for viperkiller.....your answer is; It's not acceptable marine wire. It's that simple.

Edd
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Old 01-11-2017, 06:31 PM   #23
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Can single strand house wire 12 ga be used to run from the battery to feed the fuse box? Or do I need multi strand? I happen to have the single strand wire on hand and don't want to buy any if I don't have to. Thanks in advance for any knowledgeable replies.
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Old 01-15-2017, 03:43 PM   #24
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Can single strand house wire 12 ga be used to run from the battery to feed the fuse box? Or do I need multi strand? I happen to have the single strand wire on hand and don't want to buy any if I don't have to. Thanks in advance for any knowledgeable replies.
Single-strand wire has no place on a boat. Get the right stuff - marine-gauge, tinned, stranded wire
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Old 01-15-2017, 04:24 PM   #25
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Tntrdr, just to elaborate a bit, you don't want to use single strand (romex type) wire used in homes because a boat is mobile and vibrates/pounds in service. This can cause fatigue in the wire (copper work hardens), and a break. The break will likely occur next to a connection where the wire can move but the termination is fixed. Single conductor wiring is not used in cars, airplanes, golf carts, lawn mowers, etc for the same reason.

So multistrand wire is the answer when flexibility and durability is required. Also, the tinned marine wire (each strand within the wire bundle is coated with tin) resists corrosion in a marine environment. Further, if one uses terminations with adhesive lined heat shrink tubing, the wiring run is sealed from moisture/salt entering at the ends of the wire. Hope this helps clarify.
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Old 01-15-2017, 04:56 PM   #26
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It's like groundhog day... Every so often the same questions (or variants thereof) will come up and there'll always be at least one person who'll give the wrong answer... So let's do the "wiring" dance once again:

ABYC currently mandates only marine (tinned) wire for use on boats... Yes, single strand and multiple strand domestic will work... Initially!... And should your insurance claim be tracked down to you not using appropriate wire your claim will be disallowed...

I don't disagree... In times past other types of wire (e.g. welding wire) was allowed... That's not longer the case and for good reason... This is what a # 2 non-tinned (welding) wire looks like a couple of years after having its insulation nicked...



I hope this drives home why non tinned wire is a

EDIT: in case anybody thinks the above piece of wire came from a wet bilge, think again!... This came of a 1985 Bertram 46' SF... It was part of the 12 volt electrical subsystem... Basically these boats are 32 volt... The 12 volt subsystem has two functions: starting of the generator and supplying the flybridge electronics... The wiring runs from the battery under the cockpit up the pilaster to a panel under the console... This particular piece came from where the wire transited from the pilaster to the flybridge... Basically a dry area about 10-11 feet above the water line...

The reason why single strand (domestic type) wire is not suitable on boats is vibrations... Eventually the single strand will break...

Last edited by Navatech; 01-16-2017 at 03:57 AM.
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Old 01-15-2017, 07:33 PM   #27
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My apologies for my ignorance. My boating experience, long as it may be was in fresh water environments. This is my first attempt at real boating in salt water. Therefore I beg your indulgence for not really having put any real time in a harsher environment. Also, I would like to thank you for your answers to my question, it came innocently not provocatively. I'm used to using monster stereo wire with my Minn Kota trolling motor.
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Old 01-16-2017, 03:52 AM   #28
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My apologies for my ignorance. My boating experience, long as it may be was in fresh water environments. This is my first attempt at real boating in salt water. Therefore I beg your indulgence for not really having put any real time in a harsher environment. Also, I would like to thank you for your answers to my question, it came innocently not provocatively. I'm used to using monster stereo wire with my Minn Kota trolling motor.
From a corrosion POV boats (and their systems) in fresh water are a completely different animal then boats in seawater!... Fresh water isn't a good conductor... Seawater is a very good conductor...
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Old 01-16-2017, 08:10 AM   #29
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There is a reason the ABYC has a standard for marine use wire, same with UL. And there are grades to ratings as well, such as UL type 1, 2 or 3

Romex, single strand or household extension cords have no business in a boat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by viperkiller View Post
As long as your not using junk extension cord there's no problem
So you found a source for non chinese junk imported extension cords, or do you just use what is available at HF?

There is also a reason quality marine grade wire is stranded, in most cases many thin stands, tinned, flexible, UL rated insulation, oil, gas, battery acid etc resistance.

But even tinned wire can go bad when improperly installed or sits in water, eg. dock sinking.


From Ancor's page, but there are several manufacturers that make quality marine grade wire. Pacer, Deka etc.

Wire and Cable
Ancor wires and cables are long lasting, flame retardant and extremely durable. Choose from primary wire, battery cable and specialty wire in a wide variety of sizes and in all ABYC recommended colors for standardization and ease of recognition. Ancor cable and wire is extremely flexible, eliminating wear due to flexing or vibrations on the boat, and is coated to resist the harsh effects of heat, abrasion, salt water, batter acid, oil, gasoline and UV rays. Available in standard lengths from 8 ft to 1000 ft to meet just about any marine wiring application from small repairs to complete overhauls.


A source:

http://www.bestboatwire.com/

I would never buy a used boat that someone used household wiring in. Shortcuts taken with something important certainly will lead to shortcuts everywhere else.
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