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Old 03-16-2017, 11:32 AM   #1
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Default sous vide recipes thread

I just ordered a Anova Sous Vide Precision Cooker, WIFI 2nd Gen, 900 Watt

I don't know where I have been hiding to have never heard of this device. I am excited to try it. One of our favorite eats is thick porterhouse pork chops. We marinate them for a few hours prior to grilling. Question can you still marinate before Sous Vide and if so do you pour out as much marinate before cooking or can you leave it in the ziplock and cook like that? I don't want it mushy.

Post up your favorite recipes and tricks you have acquired if you don't mind sharing. Also some recipes that you can start the night before, then throw it in the Sous Vide before you go to work that day, that would be ready for dinner.
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Old 03-16-2017, 12:34 PM   #2
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I just ordered a Anova Sous Vide Precision Cooker, WIFI 2nd Gen, 900 Watt

I don't know where I have been hiding to have never heard of this device. I am excited to try it. One of our favorite eats is thick porterhouse pork chops. We marinate them for a few hours prior to grilling. Question can you still marinate before Sous Vide and if so do you pour out as much marinate before cooking or can you leave it in the ziplock and cook like that? I don't want it mushy.

Post up your favorite recipes and tricks you have acquired if you don't mind sharing. Also some recipes that you can start the night before, then throw it in the Sous Vide before you go to work that day, that would be ready for dinner.
Two best resources I have found for general info, guidelines and recipes:
https://www.chefsteps.com/
http://www.seriouseats.com/tags/sous%20vide

There are many others, but those will get you started.

You can marinate in the bag and leave it in the bag. With protein, mushiness is more a factor of time than what's in the bag. A normal thickness steak you really don't want to go more than 4 hours or so. The thicker the cut, the more time it needs.

One thing you do need to do is make sure get all the air out the bag, which can be hard with liquid in there. You'll see on both resources I provided they use the immersion method to push air out. Doesn't work great with liquid in the bag. You can just squeeze the liquid out or freeze your marinade.

Sous vide is a great resource, particularly when cooking for a bunch of people.

For overnight, full day cook recipes you are going to want large hunks of protein. Here is a great time and temp guide: https://www.chefsteps.com/activities...perature-guide

Good luck. Do some looking and post some more questions!
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Old 03-16-2017, 12:56 PM   #3
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Thanks Matt, I didn't want to derail the crockpot Sous Vide. I also like your torch that you posted. I have one of those big torch's for the big hunk of meat. Think it will work
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Old 03-16-2017, 01:55 PM   #4
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Thanks Matt, I didn't want to derail the crockpot Sous Vide. I also like your torch that you posted. I have one of those big torch's for the big hunk of meat. Think it will work
I think it might get the job done

In all seriousness though, I hate the torch... It just doesn't work fast enough. If you have full on salamander that would work great, but not many of us are that lucky!

For searing off a large roast, I'd use either a good hot grill or - perhaps even better for something large - a really hot oven with a roast rack....
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Old 03-16-2017, 07:35 PM   #5
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I have only done steaks and pork tenderloins so far, both come out consistently delicious. The links MattGoose posted above are great resources.
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Old 03-16-2017, 07:56 PM   #6
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i shrink wrap boats with that torch
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Old 03-16-2017, 09:24 PM   #7
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i shrink wrap boats with that torch
LOL I think I paid $25 for it at Harbor Freight. I used it to burn off weeds in the driveway.
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Old 03-18-2017, 05:04 PM   #8
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Ok I just did my first cook, 4 thick rib-eye steaks. I did 4 separate zip-lock bags. I seasoned them first, got the water to 134 degrees as we like med to med rare. The total cooking time was 2 hours. I finished them in a cast iron pan on the side Weber burner with butter after the pan was really hot. I also helped them a bit with a torch. They were OK, but honestly I don't think they were as good as just grilling them. I figure there will be a learning curve. What did I do wrong?
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Old 03-20-2017, 05:59 AM   #9
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Ok I just did my first cook, 4 thick rib-eye steaks. I did 4 separate zip-lock bags. I seasoned them first, got the water to 134 degrees as we like med to med rare. The total cooking time was 2 hours. I finished them in a cast iron pan on the side Weber burner with butter after the pan was really hot. I also helped them a bit with a torch. They were OK, but honestly I don't think they were as good as just grilling them. I figure there will be a learning curve. What did I do wrong?
How thick? Steaks that are 1.5" or more tend to do best.

What didn't you like about them?

Was it a regular cast iron pan, or one with grates in it?

Did you make sure to dry them off really well?

My first reaction is that your pan probably wasn't hot enough... I'm not sure how much heat the side burner puts out or how long you let it preheat. I would sear it off on the actual grill itself - or throw the pan right on the grill and let it heat there.
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Old 03-20-2017, 11:23 AM   #10
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How thick? Steaks that are 1.5" or more tend to do best.

What didn't you like about them?

Was it a regular cast iron pan, or one with grates in it?

Did you make sure to dry them off really well?

My first reaction is that your pan probably wasn't hot enough... I'm not sure how much heat the side burner puts out or how long you let it preheat. I would sear it off on the actual grill itself - or throw the pan right on the grill and let it heat there.
1:Matt I might have gotten the tough one, I ate the other half of my wife's the next day and it was delicious.

2: regular cast iron pan

3: no I did not dry them

4: I will try that next time, how ever the side burner on my Weber has one hell of a flame. But it was about 40 degrees outside.
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Old 03-20-2017, 11:33 AM   #11
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Always dry off the meat after taking it out of the bag. Otherwise you're steaming the meat with that moisture before you can get a sear.

I pretty much always use the grill itself for the sear, rather than a pan. Only time I use a pan is when I don't have a grill available.
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Old 03-20-2017, 11:38 AM   #12
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1:Matt I might have gotten the tough one, I ate the other half of my wife's the next day and it was delicious.

2: regular cast iron pan

3: no I did not dry them

4: I will try that next time, how ever the side burner on my Weber has one hell of a flame. But it was about 40 degrees outside.
OK. Good on the regular pan.

You definitely want to dry the steaks as thoroughly as possible. Takes much, much more energy to turn the water to steam than it does to brown.

My brother in laws Weber throws a big flame too, and better if you can do it outside and avoid the smoke. If curious, you can get a cheap IR monitor (like $15 a home depot). That seems like overkill though

Try drying the steaks really well next time and see what happens!
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Old 03-20-2017, 11:40 AM   #13
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Also, if you thought the steak was a little on the tough side, go longer in the sous vide bath. I regularly do strip and ribeye steaks at 128F for 6 hours, from frozen.
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Old 03-21-2017, 07:10 AM   #14
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Eggs are awesome - you can cook them to the exact temp for your preference.

For me, poached is 145* for 45 minutes, hard 165*, soft 145.5*
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Old 03-21-2017, 10:11 AM   #15
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Thanks for the help guys, I will dry it well next time. Another question if you buy baby back ribs in the cryovac sealed wrap, can you put them right in the water and cook that way instead of re-packaging them? I realize you cant spice them that way, but the blood in the original package I would think would not be good.
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Old 03-21-2017, 10:21 AM   #16
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Thanks for the help guys, I will dry it well next time. Another question if you buy baby back ribs in the cryovac sealed wrap, can you put them right in the water and cook that way instead of re-packaging them? I realize you cant spice them that way, but the blood in the original package I would think would not be good.
You probably could...

But you'll get much better results if your prep them before cooking...

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2...-food-lab.html
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Old 03-21-2017, 12:48 PM   #17
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Try some duck breast, leg and thigh pieces. Be sure to sous them long enough to break down the connective tissue. Offhand I don't remember the temps but I soused them about 8 hours. Then pan seared. The duck is delicious.
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Old 03-22-2017, 05:19 AM   #18
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Thanks for the help guys, I will dry it well next time. Another question if you buy baby back ribs in the cryovac sealed wrap, can you put them right in the water and cook that way instead of re-packaging them? I realize you cant spice them that way, but the blood in the original package I would think would not be good.
Never ever use the original packaging for sous vide. Those cryovac packages are NOT heat rated. The seams are sometimes glued and will come apart in the heat. Also, they might have those absorbent pads in them which you really don't want to cook into your food.
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Old 03-22-2017, 12:20 PM   #19
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Can you sous vide a bone-in piece of meat? Like maybe a deer shoulder to pull apart and incorporate into various dishes? Seems like it would make it really tender, but wasn't sure if leaving the bone in would give it a more gamey taste.
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Old 03-22-2017, 12:35 PM   #20
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Can you sous vide a bone-in piece of meat? Like maybe a deer shoulder to pull apart and incorporate into various dishes? Seems like it would make it really tender, but wasn't sure if leaving the bone in would give it a more gamey taste.
You certainly can....

I can't comment on what impact it would have on taste, but I can't really imagine it would have a dramatic effect.
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