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Old 02-16-2012, 04:10 PM
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Default Let's see some Dyers, Fortiers, Nausets, Sisus, and similar.

I'll start. The following is a Dyer 29 that I looked at, but didn't buy. I sometimes wish I had.
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Old 02-16-2012, 08:07 PM
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Pease Brothers First Light, Hull 00001; sold last year, a wonderful in-shore boat that made quite a splash when we moved to FLA ....
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Old 02-17-2012, 02:25 AM
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^^ Pease Boat Works Monomoy First Light < http://www.peaseboatworks.com/firstlight26.html >








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Old 02-17-2012, 03:18 AM
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Thats mine at the Mystic show... was a great experience working with Mike and Brad.
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^^ Pease Boat Works Monomoy First Light < http://www.peaseboatworks.com/firstlight26.html >








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Old 02-17-2012, 04:56 AM
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A few shots of a friend's Fortier 30 out on Buzzards Bay
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Old 02-17-2012, 05:04 AM
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Another beautiful Downeaster, forget what it is - John Williams, Spencer Lincoln? And a working boat off Westport Harbor
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Old 02-19-2012, 07:42 PM
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Before this thread slides into back page oblivion, I thought I'd mention one that I've been thinking about as a possible next boat, the Seaway 24' Hardtop Sport < http://www.seawayboats.com/index.php...d=6&model_id=6 >. I'm dubious that it would be the right sort of boat for winter excursions into the Atlantic chasing after striped bass, but it seems perfect as fair weather picnic boat, which is how my family would use it.
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Old 02-22-2012, 12:25 PM
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A New England styled hull below the waterline. Above the waterline, well, it is different. That cabin in the back makes up into a king sized berth or two singles.

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Old 02-24-2012, 03:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by interloper View Post
I'll start. The following is a Dyer 29 that I looked at, but didn't buy. I sometimes wish I had.

That's a great looking boat. Did you get the chance to take it on a sea trial? Wonder how well they ride?
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Old 02-24-2012, 03:25 AM
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This is a 1957 " Glamour Girl" we restored.
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Old 02-24-2012, 03:42 AM
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1979 22' Tripp Angler
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Old 02-24-2012, 05:17 AM
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From the land of the Trpps - that is one sweet looking Tripp!
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Old 02-24-2012, 03:30 PM
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That's a great looking boat. Did you get the chance to take it on a sea trial? Wonder how well they ride?
I've never sea-trialed a Dyer 29. The have the reputation as being good boats when meeting waves head on, but a bit squirrelly in a following sea. This seems to be true of most New England boats with a deep forefoot and rounded bilges. The video at the following link gives an idea of the performance in modest seas.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_iA-X0wkPk

My wife and I once spent about an hour talking to a sales person aboard a new Dyer 29 at the Annapolis boat show a few years ago. It was the only boat at the show that we both liked, but the $170,000 price was well beyond our budget. My vague recollection is that the Dyer 29 in the photo at the top of this thread was initially advertised for sale for $49,000, and eventually sold for $39,000.

Part of the reason that I didn't pull the trigger on the Dyer 29 is that it is way more boat than I need. For service as a family picnic boat on the lower Chesapeake Bay, a 21-foot Seaway would be more than adequate.

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Old 02-25-2012, 05:57 AM
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Interloper,
I believe this one would not only serve you as a family picnicer but also serve you on your quest to chase stripers around the Chessie.
I'm considering selling her to move back UP. What do you think of her?Jo
26 Seaway pilothouse....totally hand refurbed....
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Old 02-25-2012, 06:39 AM
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1957 dyer that i sold in palm beach in the eighty's, could yours be my old boat sold it to a boat painter
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Old 02-25-2012, 05:38 PM
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Interloper,
I believe this one would not only serve you as a family picnicer but also serve you on your quest to chase stripers around the Chessie.
I'm considering selling her to move back UP. What do you think of her?Jo
26 Seaway pilothouse....totally hand refurbed....
It's a beautiful boat, but more "fishy" than "picnicy".
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Old 02-25-2012, 05:44 PM
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Default Dyer 29 Review by Jack Horner

http://www.boatus.com/jackhornor/power/dyer29.asp



Dyer 29

Even after more than four decades in production, the Dyer 29 is in greater demand than it has ever been and is considered by many to be one of the most handsome small boats ever built. We should all be so lucky to grow old as gracefully as has this classic design built by Warren, RI boat builder, The Anchorage Incorporated.

Design credit for the Dyer 29 goes to Nick Potter who undoubtedly was much influenced by traditional New England lobster boats when he drew the lines back in 1955. The actual overall length is 28’ 6" and the beam is a narrow 9’ 6". The bottom is v-shaped forward and progressively flattens out toward the stern. The bottom rolls into the hull sides with a radiused turn rather than a sharp corner-like edge and there is long wine glass-shaped keel integral with the hull. The keel is cut away aft for installation of the propeller and rudder and protects the running gear from damage by accidental grounding. Draft is 2’ 6" and weight is upward from 6,700 lbs. depending on model and engine selection. There is nearly 5’ of freeboard at the bow and a classic sweeping sheer that drops a foot and a half between the bow and the transom.

Various deck configurations have been offered over the years including a flush deck bass boat and several trunk cabin models with either folding canvas or fixed top over the helm and portions of the cockpit.

The Dyer 29 is not only designed to look like a seagoing vessel, she is built to be a seagoing vessel. The hull is constructed with a minimum of seven layers of hand-laid fiberglass cloth. Nine layers are used below the waterline for added strength.

The method of hull construction has changed little over the years. However, as fiberglass technology and molding techniques improved, fiberglass covered plywood and solid fiberglass decks and deckhouses of earlier model boats have given way to molded fiberglass composites utilizing a balsa wood core material. These composites provide greater rigidity and considerable weight reduction.

The decks and hulls are joined at an outward turning flange with a substantial guardrail fit directly beneath the flange to prevent damage to the sheer. A full-length spray rail is fit along the hull side above the static waterline to deflect water away from the hull. On older model boats both rails are wood although, on newer models, wood has been replaced with vinyl for more impact resistance and less maintenance.

In the early 1990s, the cockpit was slightly reconfigured when Dyer switched from fiberglass-covered plywood to a molded fiberglass composite cockpit. With this change, the ungainly engine box was replaced with a slightly raised bridgedeck over the engine and fuel tanks.

Dyer’s builder has always attempted to accommodate owner’s specifications for interior modifications. They have also offered a long list of options for both the trunk cabin and bass boat models. For this reason, it would be rare to find two Dyer 29s that were identical.

Perhaps the most outstanding and consistent feature of all Dyer 29s is their huge cockpit that accounts for more than half the boat’s overall length. The cockpit easily accommodates four fishermen or a half-dozen guests for an afternoon or evening harbor cruise. Of course, large cockpits come at the expense of cabin space. The standard cabin layout was essentially the same for all models although the trunk cabin model has standing headroom while the flush deck bass boat model provides minimal headroom. Forward are two 6’ 6" V-berths and there is a small but efficient galley along the port side. Some early trunk cabin models were built with a small dinette along the starboard side of the cabin and a marine toilet below a forward berth. Later models offer the privacy of an enclosed head in place of the dinette, in which case, meals are eaten in the cockpit.

I would be hard pressed to recommend the Dyer 29 as the ideal boat for extended cruising, however, if you are willing to sacrifice a few of the conveniences of home, weekend cruising and short vacations will be quite comfortable. Ideally the Dyer 29 is a two-person boat for overnight travel because there are only two permanent berths although, with all that cockpit space and a little ingenuity, she can provide sufficient accommodations for a small family.

More than 40 years of production and countless repowers have resulted in numerous engine and transmission combinations in existing Dyer 29s, although all are single inboard installations. Engines roughly range from 170 hp gasoline to a 315 hp diesel models. In view of this substantial range of available power, cruising and maximum speed are hard numbers to clearly define.

Currently the 29’s standard engine installation is a 200 hp Volvo diesel that, according to the Dyer’s literature, provides a cruising speed of 17 knots at 3,500 rpm. At this speed the engine is reported to consume seven gallons of fuel per hour. Top speed is reported to be just over 20 knots.

In a 1990 article, long time sailor and Dyer 29 convert Bob Bavier wrote, "At our cruising speed of 14 knots we burned a little over 3 gallons per hour". Although Mr. Bavier’s boat was a 1985 model equipped with a 200 hp Perkins diesel engine rather than the, now standard, 200 hp Volvo, the question remains. Why more than a 100 percent increase in fuel consumption in exchange for a 21 percent increase in speed? The answer lies in the simple fact that the Dyer 29 was designed for comfort not speed. The hull form is what is commonly referred to as a semi-displacement type. Without getting into too much technical jargon about speed-length ratios and such, this simply means that, given enough horsepower, the boat will develop lift and exceed the speed limits imposed by the laws of physics on displacement hull forms. The semi-displacement form is a compromise between a full displacement form and a planing form which, as evidenced by the comparison above, does not operate very efficiently at high speeds. I would expect similar economy to that experienced by Mr. Bavier for the current engine if operated in the same 14-knot speed range. Such a huge cost for a few extra knots does not make sense to me but it’s nice to know you have the extra power when you might need it.

As I said, the Dyer 29 is designed for comfort not speed. She particularly shines heading into a chop where her fine entry, high freeboard and rounded chine combine to produce a smooth ride in all but the most extreme conditions. The 29 can be a bit tricky to handle in a following sea in part because the fine entry that makes her superb in a chop acts against her in a following sea. Sharp attention to steering is necessary and this is where the extra horsepower will come in handy in gaining control. All things considered this is a great sea boat and it would be difficult to find a more comfortable riding boat in this size range.

In an attempt to gather some insight on common problems of older Dyer 29s, I recently paid a visit to Bob Stine at Black Dog Boat Works, Inc. of Denton, MD. Black Dog specializes in maintaining, repairing and renovating older Dyer 29s as well as other classic yachts, sport fishermen and trawlers. As luck would have it, I found three Dyer 29s undergoing varying degrees of renovation and repair. Although two of the boats in Stine’s shop were models from the late 1950s, none were undergoing repair due to major problems resulting from age. According to Stine, these boats truly do grow old gracefully and most of his work involves upgrading systems and machinery, not necessarily fixing things that have broken. Bob explained that he has renovated some older Dyer 29 models for less than $10,000 and others for well over $50,000. The major cost factor in renovating is what to do with aging engines. Rebuilding a gasoline engine could cost under $3,000 while upgrading to a new diesel could exceed $20,000.

What separates the Dyer 29 from every other vessel that was first built nearly 45 years ago is that you can still go to the manufacturer and buy a new one. All new sales of Dyer 29s are factory direct and the base price of a new model with standard equipment is $129,900. The standard boat is well equipped but there are long lists of options that can easily push the cost past the $150,000 mark.

According to Annie Lannigan, Dyer Boats’ sales and marketing manager, hull number 332 was under construction as of mid-August 1999 and the company currently has 15 Dyer 29s on order. Unfortunately, if you placed an order for a new Dyer 29 today, you would have to wait approximately 18 months for delivery.

If you’re not willing to wait that 18 months or $150,000 is just a bit out of your price range there are a number of used Dyer 29s for sale. I was able to find two boats in Florida, two in New England, one in the Chesapeake and one on Long Island offered for sale at prices ranging from $30,000 to $85,000.

The Dyer 29 story is clearly a long way from over and I, for one, hope they are around for at least another 40 years.

Jack Hornor, NA is the principal surveyor and senior designer for the Annapolis-based Marine Survey & Design Co.

Principal Dimensions & Specifications
Measurements should be considered approximate and the manufacturer’s specifications may be relied upon. Bow & stern appendages are generally excluded.

Length Overall: 28’ 6"

Maximum Beam: 9’ 6"

Maximum Draft: 2’ 6"

Displacement/Weight: 6,700 Lbs

Fuel Capacity: 110-135 Gallons

Water Capacity: 24 Gallons

Top Speed Range: 14-24 Knots
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Old 02-25-2012, 05:46 PM
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Default Sisu 26 / Lowell 26 review by Jack Horner

http://www.boatus.com/jackhornor/power/sisu26.asp



26 Sisu / Lowell 26

Sisu is a Finnish word that loosely translated into English means to "to have guts," not momentary courage, but the ability to sustain and endure. After nearly 30 years of utility for just about everything from offshore tuna fishing, to commercial lobstering to finely finished yachts, the diminutive 26-foot model has certainly proven she has “guts” and endurance. The Sisu 26 has proven to be one of the most capable seagoing powerboats built.

The design is by third generation New England boatbuilding/designing brothers Royal and Carroll Lowell — the grandsons of legendary boatbuilder/designer Will Frost. The influence of their grandfather, who is generally regarded as the originator of Maine lobster-style boats, is certainly apparent in this design.

Built by Sisu Boat Inc. of Portsmouth, NH, the 26 Sisu was introduced in 1979 and remained in production until the company went out of business in 1988. Her principal dimensions are 26 feet in length overall, 9-foot-8-inch beam, 3-foot draft and a displacement of approximately 7,500 lbs.

Sisu offered the boat in a number of configurations including an open express, lobster boat and cabin cruiser (pictured). They also offered her in a variety of stages of completion from basic hull and deck to a completed yacht-quality cabin cruiser. It was not uncommon for other boatbuilders to purchase hulls and decks and finish them to their own specifications. Because some of these craft were not finished and put into service until after Sisu went out of business, sometimes 26 Sisu models show up for sale that are newer than 1988.

After years of being out of production, it is fitting that fourth-generation brothers Jamie and Joe Lowell have recently updated the design of their father and uncle and are now once again offering this design as the Lowell 26.

All 26 Sisu models are constructed of fiberglass composites although, whether at the whim of the builder or at the request of customers, I have seen slight differences in construction methods. For example, most hulls were constructed utilizing balsa wood core from the deck edge to the turn of the keel although on occasion the balsa core was terminated at the waterline. Structural reinforcement is provided by plywood bulkheads that are resin coated and securely attached with woven roving fiberglass cloth and polyester resin. Decks and superstructure are likewise fiberglass composites with plywood and balsa reinforcement. These methods are not fancy or high-tech but they’re proven, in many cases, by years of commercial service that can subject a vessel to more stress and abuse in one year than recreational boats are likely to see in 20 years.

Careful attention does need to be paid anywhere fittings are mounted through balsa cored composites to ensure that water has not migrated and caused core damage. Depending on where and how vessels were used, some degree of elevated moisture content and osmotic blistering can be expected below the static waterline.

The cockpit of the express and hard top workboat models of the 26 Sisu measure nearly 14-feet long by 8-feet wide and, except for a motor box, is virtually unobstructed. The cockpit deck is cambered with large freeing ports in the transom so that water drains quickly.

A variety of enclosed and partially enclosed sedan models were built some with raised bridgedecks to eliminate the protrusion of a motor box. The decks along the cabin side are only about eight inches wide and there are no side rails for support, although a hand rail is provided on the cabin top. The foredeck is sometimes open and sometimes protected by a stainless steel rail and most yacht finished models have a short bow pulpit for convenient storage and handling of ground tackle.

Depending on the service and wishes of owners, the small cuddy cabin may be outfitted with the bare essentials of a couple of shelves and a port-a-potty, finished to a fine yacht standard with V-berth, small galley and a fully enclosed head or just about anywhere in between. The accommodation space is small and when set up as a cruiser, necessitates a V-berth that is barely six feet long, cramped head and minimal galley facilities.

Because the 26 Sisu served so many different segments of the market she can be found with an equally divergent variety of auxiliary power options, both gasoline and diesel. Many of the boats used for commercial applications were powered by four-cylinder diesel engines ranging from 50 to 120 hp and operating in the eight- to 12-knot speed range. However, I know of at least one boat with a 300-hp gasoline engine that will do nearly 30 knots wide open. This is the extreme, not recommended and may be unsafe in a boat that was never intended to go this fast. From a practical standpoint, this should be considered an eight- to 18-knot boat and powered and operated accordingly.

My research, in the middle of March, found nine used 26 Sisus offered for sale, most in the New England area. Asking prices ranged from $24,500 to $59,999 while reported sales, over the last year, have ranged between $19,000 and $45,000. Prices typically reflect the level to which these boats are finished.

The 26 Sisu remains a sought after boat for commercial as well as recreational use and should continue to hold its value for years to come. This is a boat that combines solid construction, traditional Downeast design and proven seakeeping ability in conditions that most of us hope we’re never caught in.

Jack Hornor, NA is the principal surveyor and senior designer for the Annapolis-based Marine Survey & Design Co.
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Old 02-25-2012, 05:49 PM
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Default Fortier 26 reivew by Jack Horner

http://www.boatus.com/jackhornor/power/fortier26.asp



Fortier 26

At first glance, the clean, classic lines of the Fortier 26 might be mistaken for one of the Down East-styled boats that have proliferated over the last few years and are generally referred to as "Picnic Boats" after the Hinckley model of the same name that was introduced in 1995. Fortier 26 owners would likely scoff at the suggestion and insist that their’s are no "Picnic Boats" but flat out fishing machines.

The history of the Fortier 26 dates back to 1957 when the noted New England design firm of Eldredge-McInnis drew the lines for a 26’ bass boat to be built by Brownell Boat Works of Mattapoisett, MA. Later the design was slightly modified and built by Moss Marine of Fall River, MA as the Sakonnet 26. In the 1970s Alan McInnis modified the design to convert from wood to fiberglass construction. Fortier Boats, of Riverside, MA, purchased the design and began fiberglass construction in 1977. In the last 22 years 342 Fortier 26s have been built and production is still going strong.

There are bass boats and then there are bass boats. The Fortier 26 is patterned after a class of boats that evolved to meet the needs of fisherman who fished for striped bass along the shores from New Jersey through New England. Because the boat is such a stable fishing platform and handles short choppy sea conditions well, in more recent years, it has become a favorite of rockfish (striped bass) fishermen on the Chesapeake Bay. This bass boat should not be confused with the low-slung, trailerable models sporting 150 hp outboard engines and intended for freshwater bass fishing.

The Fortier 26 has a very fine bow and narrow entry forward which helps reduce pounding and improves maneuverability in short choppy seas. There is considerable flare forward and a full-length, molded spray rail that runs along the chine from the stem to the transom to help the boat and crew to keep dry. The boat’s 10’ beam is considerable for a 26’ boat of this vintage and, combined with the hard chine, provides a very stable platform from which to fish. A molded keel runs nearly the full length of the boat and adds to the boat’s directional stability as well as provides excellent protection for the shaft, propeller and rudder. The rudder is supported on the bottom by a cast bronze shoe that extends from the keel.

Although the styling of the Fortier 26 may be traditional, her construction utilizes modern, but not state of the art, materials and methods. The hull is hand laid-up utilizing chopped strand fiberglass mat and woven roving over a closed-cell foam core. The core is 5/8" thick on the bottom and 1/2" on the hull sides. Currently Core-Cell™ is used although earlier models were built with Airex™ core material. The result is a hull that is over an inch thick in critical areas and exceptionally stiff and strong. The decks are constructed in a similar fashion and deck hardware is securely attached with stainless steel nuts bolts and washers. Even fish rod holders are bolted using fiberglass-backing plates.

The hull sides of the Fortier 26 are flared at the shear to form a rub rail and a unique method of joining the deck and hull. The joint is secured and reinforced with fiberglass for the entire length that results in, for all intents and purpose, a single piece hull and deck structure which is stronger and less prone to leaking than the traditional method of mechanical and adhesive fastening the deck and hull. A stainless steel molding is fastened to the rub rail for added protection. Since the early 1990s, the cockpit deck has been constructed of two removable sections that allows easy access to the bilges for service of fuel, exhaust and steering systems and since 1990, all Fortier boats have been built with an outer coat of vinylester resin to help prevent osmotic blistering.

The downside of this rugged, heavy duty, method of construction is increased weight. At approximately 6,500 lbs, the Fortier 26 is 1,000 lbs heavier than many fishing models in this size range and will cost a few miles per hour in performance.

Make no mistake about, it the Fortier 26 is designed to accommodate fishermen not overnight guests. There is a huge cockpit that measures nearly 9’ wide and is 16’ long between the cabin bulkhead and the transom. The cockpit is deep and provides a secure feeling even when conditions get nasty. There is a 3’ by 4’ engine box about centered in the boat and raised approximately 15" above the cockpit sole. With the optional helm seat and passenger seat in place moving forward requires stepping over the engine box that is a minor inconvenience. On the other hand, the box provides additional seating or a perfect spot to put out that "picnic" lunch.

The Fortier offers minimal accommodations for two in a small cuddy cabin. One step down through the 20" wide companionway there is a single stainless steel sink on the left and a two-burner alcohol stove fitted into the counter top on the right with storage behind and underneath. Forward there are two full-length berths in a "V" configuration that will sleep two adults comfortably. There is a marine toilet beneath the port side berth. Headroom in the cabin is limited to 5’4" except directly in the companionway entrance. The accommodations offer no privacy but this is about the best that can be expected with space available.

As would be expected with any boat that as been offered for more than 20 years, there have been a number of gasoline and diesel engine options over the years. For current production the standard engine is the 200 Hp Volvo TAMD41 model. Various other offerings over the years have ranged from 255 HP Mercruiser gasoline engines to 230 HP Yanmar Diesel power. For more than the last ten years, diesel engines have been standard equipment. The engine box is easily removed for access and maintenance and if the engine ever has to be removed for maintenance or replacement the job is a snap.

Cruising speed, depending on the engine and how the boat is loaded, will range from 17 to 21 mph with a top end speed in the range of 23 to 27 mph. There are two 50-gallon fuel tanks fitted below the cockpit deck, which provide an approximate range, at cruising speed, of 210 to 250 miles.

As the numbers above suggest the Fortier 26 is not a particularly fast boat but generally she handles exceptionally well. Like most boats that have been refined over the years for a specific task, the Fortier 26 does have a few little handling quirks. One in particular is the tendency of the bow to swing off or hunt in a following sea. Most experienced operators of the 26, as well as the boat’s builder and designer, have found this condition can be mitigated considerably by not over-steering but by making slight helm and throttle adjustments to get the boat in synch with the sea.

The ride of the Fortier 26 is quite dry particularly in short chop and under normal loading she will run at a 4 or 5 degrees bow up angle which is considered just about ideal for this size and type of boat. Even with a single engine, handling is quite good in close quarters. At idle speed she’ll complete a 360-degree forward circle in less than two boat lengths.

The Fortier 26 is a very solidly built boat with few problems even as these boats approach and pass the 20-year mark. Owners should keep in mind that these boats are constructed with a core material between layers of fiberglass that can present some unique challenges for repair and installation of through-hull fittings and attachments. If you are not familiar with the special requirements of this type of construction you should seek some advice from an experienced source before attempting any modification or repair.

Refinishing, necessitated by normal wear and tear, and rebuilding or replacing tired engines with high operating hours are the most common and expensive repairs. The cost to refinish will depend greatly on the condition of the present finish and the surface preparation required. A professional repair is likely start in the neighborhood of $2,500 for hull topsides. Rebuilding engines and repowering can range from $2,500 to nearly $20,000.

There has been a tremendous surge in the popularity of this particular style of boat over the last few years which, combined with our generally strong economy, has resulted in high demand and high prices for used Fortier 26s. Prices are more likely to reflect the condition of the boat than the age and do not seem to be in line with published book values. For example, in my research, I was able to locate four Fortier 26s offered for sale. The ages ranged from 1979 to 1996 and asking prices ranged from $47,000 to $79,000. With the exception of the 1996 model, all asking prices were at least twice what the published book value suggested. Keep in mind these are asking prices but there is a trend toward premiums being placed on this type of boat. The current base price of a new Fortier 26 is $71,500 but there is a year and a half to two-year waiting list and the delivered price, with reasonable options and equipment, is likely to be over $90,000.

There is no perfect boat for everyone and the Fortier 26 is no exception. Her 10’ beam prevents trailering without special permits so she will not appeal to the person to whom overland mobility is a concern. And, with a modest cruising speed and range she will be less than ideal for ranging far offshore. However, for the serious coastal fisherman, this is a tough boat to beat when it comes to classic good looks, quality of construction, comfort and accommodations in a 26’ model.

Jack Hornor, NA is the principal surveyor and senior designer for the Annapolis-based Marine Survey & Design Co.

Principal Dimensions & Specifications
Measurements should be considered approximate and the manufacturer’s specifications may be relied upon. Bow & stern appendages are generally excluded.

Length Overall: 26’ 9"

Maximum Beam: 10’

Maximum Draft: 2’ 6"

Displacement/Weight: 6,500 Lbs

Fuel Capacity: 100 Gallons

Water Capacity: N/A

Top Speed Range: 25 Mph
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Old 02-25-2012, 05:49 PM
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I hear ya but......if I took off the fishbox and LL reel you would have enough room for a loveseat, table and chairs and still have a roomy "V" berth down below! Just Sayin.... Jo
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