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Old 08-21-2014, 08:35 AM   #1
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Default Albury Brothers 23' Build Thread

We have had an exciting and eventful summer here at Albury Brothers and thought we would have a little fun by sharing the build process of an Albury 23'. We took a series of photos from beginning to end and will keep it updated as she comes along.

This first post will show the empty mold through applying the skin coat of hand laid glass, and some additional layers of structural laminate.
After properly cleaning, waxing, and tape testing the mold, we shoot the gel-coat, which happens to be a warm and tropical Sea-Foam green for this customer.

A notable characteristic of our build process involves the hull being pulled under vacuum during all working hours to ensure the shape is properly maintained as the laminate cures.
The following schedule is a labor of love which involves our hulls being in the mold for two full weeks, providing the consistent and beautiful finish we are known for; highly regarded quality takes time.

You will not find a chopper gun in our facility, so like all laminate in an Albury Brothers Boat, the skin coat is hand laid and rolled with Vinylester resin for excellent resistance to blistering.
Following the skin coat we begin to build up the laminate using a variety of material, applying two layers a day to ensure proper resin distribution and cure between layers.
From the chine down she is layered with mat and 24 oz. Woven Rove.
We continue to hand lay our boats with solid glass bottoms for a variety of reasons, one in particular being the ability to build up the thickness and mass in the bottom necessary to make our hull design so sea-kindly. This mass provides important weight down low in the boat for proper balance and C.G, and the the ability to absorb energy when running the boat in rough conditions.
The transition above the chine is a whole different story, which we will share with you all shortly!
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Old 08-21-2014, 08:39 AM   #2
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Nice !
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Old 08-21-2014, 08:45 AM   #3
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Very nice! Thank you for posting this thread. Wish all builders would do this.
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Old 08-21-2014, 08:48 AM   #4
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keep those pics coming
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Old 08-21-2014, 09:29 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailcrazy View Post
Following the skin coat we begin to build up the laminate using a variety of material, applying two layers a day to ensure proper resin distribution and cure between layers.
From the chine down she is layered with mat and 24 oz. Woven Rove
.
Thanks for posting!!!

Question, is there a technical reason for using Matt/WR combination over a knit frabric for your application?
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Old 08-21-2014, 01:46 PM   #6
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Great idea posting the build process. As an owner who lives in S. Florida i was able to watch some of the build on my boat and i can assure you these guys are detail oriented and don't cut any corners. Nice to see the process explained. Good job!
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Old 08-21-2014, 03:46 PM   #7
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Quote:
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Thanks for posting!!!

Question, is there a technical reason for using Matt/WR combination over a knit frabric for your application?
I would think to avoid print through, reduce voids and ensure a better bond between layers.
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Old 08-21-2014, 04:53 PM   #8
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Nice pics and thread.

It would be even more interesting to see some pics of the Albury family building a boat at the original site on Man-O-War Cay.
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Old 08-21-2014, 05:37 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maxie View Post
Thanks for posting!!!

Question, is there a technical reason for using Matt/WR combination over a knit frabric for your application?
Yes, Rove does the following for us.

"ability to build up the thickness and mass in the bottom...This mass provides important weight down low in the boat for proper balance and C.G, and the ability to absorb energy..."

Rove is thick, flexible, and sucks up a bunch of resin. We use knit fabric above the chine/sole level because it is lighter and absorbs much less resin. Knit doesn't turn tight radiuses and corners like rove either.

The thing you must keep in mind is the importance of weight, and strength, derived from, MASS and THICKNESS. This is a major issue with composite manufacturers who engineer thin laminates. You can get very thin by using Carbon Fiber, Kevlar or Infusing hulls. You have got to get the thickness back by using core, or you have to use additional grillage/stringers/bulkheads for support. Fiberglass manufacturers have been striving to engineer fiberglass for infusion with lots of "Loft" (ie. thick and high) to gain mass. Thin laminates will cycle (flex) until they crack or tear. That's ok in a racing hull but won't work if your building a boat to stand the test of time.

I was involved in racing sailboats back in the day. The objective was to get all the weight out of the boat, and low and in the middle by using a lead keel. At the extreme these boats were all carbon fiber & epoxy, very thin skins with core cell foam coring. I will never forget jumping down from the dock onto the Melges 30 hull #1 deck and hearing the carbon fiber crack like I just broke through a sheet of ice on a pond. A non-racing powerboat, needs weight to keep the hull in control and moving comfortably thru the water.

Another great memory is a sailboat racing friend of mine who purchased a old powerboat hull, gutted it, and rebuilt her just like you would a racing sailboat. That hull and deck weighed almost nothing. He takes her out first time and she is just uncontrollable, flying off every wave. Certainly you can have a light powerboat hull so long as it is correct shape to stay in control on top of the waves. Fountain, Cigarette, Nor-Tech does it.
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Old 08-21-2014, 06:54 PM   #10
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So cool!
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Old 08-22-2014, 01:27 AM   #11
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Sweet!

I've gotta question I was gonna start a thread about, but now I'll just ask it here. How many have been built with a tower? Whether it be a stand on console or full tower. I'd love to know how one performs with a tower. My Google search only shows one.
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Old 08-22-2014, 05:47 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlichterman View Post
Yes, Rove does the following for us.

"ability to build up the thickness and mass in the bottom...This mass provides important weight down low in the boat for proper balance and C.G, and the ability to absorb energy..."

Rove is thick, flexible, and sucks up a bunch of resin. We use knit fabric above the chine/sole level because it is lighter and absorbs much less resin. Knit doesn't turn tight radiuses and corners like rove either.

The thing you must keep in mind is the importance of weight, and strength, derived from, MASS and THICKNESS. This is a major issue with composite manufacturers who engineer thin laminates. You can get very thin by using Carbon Fiber, Kevlar or Infusing hulls. You have got to get the thickness back by using core, or you have to use additional grillage/stringers/bulkheads for support. Fiberglass manufacturers have been striving to engineer fiberglass for infusion with lots of "Loft" (ie. thick and high) to gain mass. Thin laminates will cycle (flex) until they crack or tear. That's ok in a racing hull but won't work if your building a boat to stand the test of time.

I was involved in racing sailboats back in the day. The objective was to get all the weight out of the boat, and low and in the middle by using a lead keel. At the extreme these boats were all carbon fiber & epoxy, very thin skins with core cell foam coring. I will never forget jumping down from the dock onto the Melges 30 hull #1 deck and hearing the carbon fiber crack like I just broke through a sheet of ice on a pond. A non-racing powerboat, needs weight to keep the hull in control and moving comfortably thru the water.

Another great memory is a sailboat racing friend of mine who purchased a old powerboat hull, gutted it, and rebuilt her just like you would a racing sailboat. That hull and deck weighed almost nothing. He takes her out first time and she is just uncontrollable, flying off every wave. Certainly you can have a light powerboat hull so long as it is correct shape to stay in control on top of the waves. Fountain, Cigarette, Nor-Tech does it.
Thanks for your explanation JL......as a follow up, Sailcrazy mentioned that the hull stays under vacuum in between layer applications and after final layering for up to 2 weeks in the mold....but with matt and WR eating up the resin, does the bag process pull out a lot of your resin, ie, is there a lot of resin waste in the process or are you limiting the amount of pull just to compress and form the glass to a certain point, maintaining the glass to resin ratio??
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Old 08-22-2014, 09:33 AM   #13
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Maxie. We are not bagging the glass. We are sucking down the hull in the mold so it does not pre-release. In the picture you can see the vacuum tube coming out of the mold.
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Old 08-22-2014, 11:08 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by jlichterman View Post
Maxie. We are not bagging the glass. We are sucking down the hull in the mold so it does not pre-release. In the picture you can see the vacuum tube coming out of the mold.
You mean the tube coming out of the garboard drain hole? That's an interesting way of doing things......I wouldn't think a single point system would be enough to hold down the fort evenly across the entire mold........neat idea.....
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Old 08-23-2014, 03:25 AM   #15
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Vacuum is powerful stuff. Parts want to stay attached to the mold but resin shrinks as it cures. A additional advantage to vinyester is that it shrinks less than polyester resin, so it's good to have as a base. If you have a male mold/female part it's never a issue because the part gets tighter on the mold. Here you have a male mold/female part. She is susceptible to pre-release only in the aft, flat sections at the bottom of the hull because of no radius pushing out, and on the topside just forward of the transom because there are so many glass overlaps the shrinkage rate is higher.

We recently received a call from a new owner whose only complaint was he could not open the fishbox hatch while the macerator pump was on, that is the power of vacuum. Coming up on this thread is how vacuum is used to attach the inner liner to the hull.
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Old 08-29-2014, 11:55 AM   #16
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A transition in the build process begins as we move up from the chine. As stated earlier, we use old school methods down below to maintain vital weight and mass where it matters most. In the first picture you can see some hull bottom sections cut from 23's.

Moving up from the chine, we transition toward high-tech materials that are lighter, yet strong and durable. In the pictures, you will see ½” Core-Cell bonded to the hull sides. Using the core material between layers of fiberglass on both sides provides great strength. Core builds up mass and thickness without adding much weight. Core-Cell can take a beating over and over and still retain its strength. Core-Cell is the only foam certified by DNV for Slamming and Fatigue areas, Cross-linked PVCs are not.

Following the core material we continue laminating the hull with fiberglass using layers of mat and 17 oz. bi-axial in the hull sides. This method is lighter, yet very strong, to keep the C.G low.

In the transom area, the Coosa-Board composite core is glassed in, creating a durable and strong section to accept large outboard power.

Finally, the backbone gets put in place; 14” wide, all glass, top-hat stringers. The stringers are laid in the hull using a jig to ensure consistent spacing and placement, and level bonding of the sole. The stringers are then glassed into the hull from bow to stern and chine to keel, using layers of woven-rove and mat, to form a singular bond. The stringers will be filled with foam during the assembly process.
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Old 09-18-2014, 12:38 PM   #17
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The next step is assembly of the three main parts built by the lamination team. This process includes joining the inner liner and deck cap, after various components are installed.

One of the first tasks of is making the transom cut in the hull, to mirror the splashwell. Next, fiberglass bulkheads are put in place to “coffin-box” the fuel tank, and capture the poured four-pound foam that fills both the fuel tank cavity and stringers. Excess foam is then removed, and the remainder sealed with resin. This tank is made of aluminum and coated with coal tar epoxy for extra corrosion protection.

The PVC spray rails are installed with an impressive three step process. They are applied to the hull with 5200, through bolted using fender washers with ny-lock nuts, then fiber-glassed on the inside to prevent water intrusion. The optional plastic water tank is installed in the bow, and held securely in place with fiberglass bulkheads and knees.

Bilge pumps, live-well pumps, diaphragm pumps, sea-cocks, through hull fittings, trim tabs, transducers and so forth, are installed at this time. Hoses for fuel, fish boxes, and various types of water are run, doubled-clamped if appropriate, and fastened. Hose connections which are unable to be completed at this time are taped sealed and in place to avoid conflict or pinching when installing the liner. The wiring harness is also created and/or installed at this time, and joined to the respective component using heat shrink or a Deutch connector.
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Old 09-18-2014, 02:22 PM   #18
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love watching the build process...about as much as building fine quality homes. Keep up the great work y'all.
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Old 10-02-2014, 12:35 PM   #19
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Once the hull has received all necessary components, it is time to insert the liner. The liner is laminated using layers of mat, biaxial, and bi-ply fiberglass. The cockpit sole and hatches incorporate the same Core-Cell that is in the hull-sides for long-term rigidity. Being a closed cell composite, core-cell will prevent soft deck problems that can occur when inferior core material is used and penetrated. Notice in the photos, the aft fish-box receives spray foam insulation to help keep ice longer. After the liner is de-molded, the flange is removed and components such as rod racks are installed.

Albury Brothers Boats are a 3-piece design, meaning the liner and deck cap are two separate pieces. Our design allows the liner to bond flush to the inner hull, opening up interior volume, provides toe-kick, and making a strong and rattle-free bonded structure. To create a solid bond of the hull and liner, we apply high-strength adhesive putty called Poly-Bond to the hull and stringers. Once the adhesive is troweled on, we have to work quickly to set the liner in place, make an air tight seal, install a fixture to maintain beam, and turn the vacuum on. This process creates a singular bond of the two units, while ensuring the shape is maintained.

The third piece of the boat is the deck cap. After the cleats, rod holders, deck fills, etc… are in place, it is installed on the boat.
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Old 10-02-2014, 12:48 PM   #20
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What's the purpose of the break in stringer height starboard side just aft of fuel tank?
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