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Old 09-15-2010, 10:47 PM
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Default hourly labor rate ?

Can anyone tell me what hourly rate you pay your mechanic...getting charged $100 per hour by a certified mercury mechanic is that too much ?
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Old 09-15-2010, 10:52 PM
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My mechanic is flexible in the winter when its dead and you have work done he charges around 50-60 hr but during the spring and summer months he charges 85 hour and he is also OMC and Mercury Marine Certified. Seems a little steep to me.
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Old 09-15-2010, 10:55 PM
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The guy got real upset when I questioned his price....
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Old 09-15-2010, 11:10 PM
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To be honest with you I myself have been looking for a new mechanic and I have heard all different things as far as rates go. Some guys get 50 hr and do great work and some get a 100 and do great work and vice versa. It all depends on the person. If I were you I would ask friends who have boats, at the local marina, etc. These people can be the best advice for finding a good mechanic at a reasonable price.
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Old 09-16-2010, 02:52 AM
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Default depends on what or who ya get...

you should be about 90 bucks on the high side in my opinion. if you are paying that much figure out if they are supporting a whole shop, boss, brand new 3500 chevy dually and insurance. if they are then it is a fair price.. I do vst tanks for 450..base price plus filters.. takes me about 4 hours to do the job and put it back together and i had a guy ream me up and down because of the cost... what he did not see is clean-up, parts run, disposal of old nasty filters and gas that stinks, carb cleaner.. nor did he have any respect for me knowing how and what to do to get his happy lil butt back on the water.

2 days ago I had to go down to a hot engine room and hear someone totally ream me a new one about how their boat would not start and they were sure it had to do with 'me' putting on a new ground cables on the motor,, basically when they checked the oil on the yanmar 440 hp stp engine they un-plugged the starter wire on the relay...

I plugged it back in and asked them to hit the starter... cranked right up.. even showed them how to take it back apart and start the motor without the key in case of emergency's.. knowledge like this does not come cheap and can get people out of trouble fast.

I don't advertise and I'd rather fish because of what people have become on expecting miracles in the ethanol age. plus bad gas stinks... dealing with people is sometimes worth an extra 10 bucks an hour and I am not saying that about you... but always know your mechanic.
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Old 09-16-2010, 03:39 AM
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These kill me. I worked a long time for very little learning my trade. I spent many hours in classes while other guys were having a beer w/ their friends. I spent many thousands on tools, which I've had customers try to take, or had someone break into the van to steal. I could go on, but how much do you pay sea tow when you break down in the ocean, or do you have the ins. Buy an extended Warranty & don't worry about Hourly rate. 3 parts of every repair; Fast, Good, Cheap. Pick 2, Fast & cheap = not good, good & cheap + not fast, fast & good = not cheap. Sorry for the rant, but!
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Old 09-16-2010, 04:00 AM
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Depends where you are - you don't say.
On LI, $110-125/hr is typical for a certified gas/outboard mechanic; non-factory diesel guys are $125-140/hr; the guys at CAT are $165/hr.
I'd imagine in North Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, etc, the rates are likely 30% or more lower.
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Old 09-16-2010, 04:33 AM
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I think it depends where you are. The going rate in the Greater Boston area seems to be $95-$100 per hour.
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Old 09-16-2010, 04:52 AM
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I think (but not sure) it can depend on how much warranty work the shop does. Manufacturers typically only pay a percentage of the shops posted hourly rate. If they only get 65% from the manufacturer then they have to charge you $100 to get $65 for warranty work. The guys that do no warranty work can post a $75 hourly rate and actually come out better off (assuming they have enough work to stay busy).
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Old 09-16-2010, 05:06 AM
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If you deal with a reputable shop, the hourly fee goes to the owner who pays the salaries, rent, insurance, taxes and other expenses. He keeps a staff of mechanics, each of whom brings a different skill set to the table and can be called in when there are issues that the primary mechanic is having difficulty with. He is likely to be there and willing to help if there are followup problems.

When the guy in overalls in an old van comes by and fixes your boat for cash, he keeps all of that money. Chances are he is off the grid when it comes to taxes and insurance. He will do what he knows what to do, but if the problem is more complicated he will take the money and run. He may not have the right tools to get the job done correctly.

For the most part, you get what you pay for.
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Old 09-16-2010, 05:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perfidiajoe View Post
These kill me. I worked a long time for very little learning my trade. I spent many hours in classes while other guys were having a beer w/ their friends. I spent many thousands on tools, which I've had customers try to take, or had someone break into the van to steal. I could go on, but how much do you pay sea tow when you break down in the ocean, or do you have the ins. Buy an extended Warranty & don't worry about Hourly rate. 3 parts of every repair; Fast, Good, Cheap. Pick 2, Fast & cheap = not good, good & cheap + not fast, fast & good = not cheap. Sorry for the rant, but!
Opinion's like your's also kill me . Does everyone in this world feel entitled to make astronomical fees for services rendered! When the heck will folks learn thats whats killing our entire economy We cannot continue to pay people at the scales we do and think that our economy will be safe from a total collapse very, very soon.

"Buy an extended Warranty & don't worry about Hourly rate." OMG

Sir, you need a class in economics! & a little common sense.
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Old 09-16-2010, 05:20 AM
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Quote:
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If you deal with a reputable shop, the hourly fee goes to the owner who pays the salaries, rent, insurance, taxes and other expenses. He keeps a staff of mechanics, each of whom brings a different skill set to the table and can be called in when there are issues that the primary mechanic is having difficulty with. He is likely to be there and willing to help if there are followup problems.

When the guy in overalls in an old van comes by and fixes your boat for cash, he keeps all of that money. Chances are he is off the grid when it comes to taxes and insurance. He will do what he knows what to do, but if the problem is more complicated he will take the money and run. He may not have the right tools to get the job done correctly.

For the most part, you get what you pay for.
DING we have a winner. Tax, insurance, workers comp store front and Continuing TRAINING cost money. Way more than you would think.

The underground cash economy is growing every day (and it is bad idea to withhold money from uncle sam)

Sure any jerk can swap plugs, change oil and water pumps but you should know how to do these things anyway.
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Old 09-16-2010, 05:24 AM
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Here's my problem: I fly a jet worth about 10 million. Qualified shop labor runs LESS (almost half) than that for my $5000 Yamaha. Believe me, their tools, hangar, fluid disposal costs a ton more than that of an outboard shop. Don't even get me into training and liability.

I'll tell you why shops get the rates they do: Because we pay it.
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Old 09-16-2010, 05:34 AM
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IN NJ, anywhere from 90-125 is a regular rate. The more high profile the shop, and the more qualified personnel get a higher rate.

One thing I do know(and just recently found out) is that a "general" mechanic costs more than he makes to insure. For instance, as a company, let's say you pay your tech $20/hr(about the going rate in NJ for an experienced, but younger employee), it would cost you ROUGHLY $60/hr to for insurance and what you have to pay in unemployment and workman's comp. So, anything above 60, is what the company makes to stay afloat. The insurance stays the same, but pay may go up. If you have to have a factory trained tech, I would imagine he makes a minimum of $30/hr, so then you are paying out $70/hr. Also, the company has to make up for lost time. Most places can NEVER charge out all the time spent. Like let's say it takes the tech 10 min. to get to your boat in the yard, that's 20 min. round trip. Most places can't bill that out. Would you rather pay 90(instead of 100) but then realize you are paying for the guys smoke-break, and travel time to your boat?

I think that if you get in under 100/hr you're making out OK.
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Old 09-16-2010, 05:40 AM
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Spraynet, What do you do, & what do you get? If it is so easy do it your self, & don't bring it to someone such as I. I have kids, a mortage pay taxes, Ins. Utilities, health care, just like everyone else does or should. Learn Econimics, that's a joke right? I go home do the books, check & reorder inventory, do payroll, etc. building maintenance, & I don't get paid for every part that sits on the shelf that people expect you to have, & should, but may never sell. All this in a business that dies for months, but the bills go on. I guess only you should make money, I should give my skill away, by the way, a skill in which there is always something new to learn, which costs money to learn with new equipment to buy. You make me laugh, "Pay peanuts, you get Monkees"
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Old 09-16-2010, 05:49 AM
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$85 an hour, certified Merc Mechanic.

I feel like that's fair....
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Old 09-16-2010, 05:54 AM
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My mechanic charges around $90 an hour. Since I've been using the same guy for a few years now, what I noticed is in the winter months he will still charge me $90/hour but he shaves a few hours off the job to cut me a break.
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Old 09-16-2010, 05:56 AM
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Depends on where you are located. On the North Shore of Long Island, about $115 an hour, in Newport RI, about $85 an hour, in Mt Desert ME, about $55 - 65 an hour.
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Old 09-16-2010, 06:14 AM
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Quote:
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My mechanic charges around $90 an hour. Since I've been using the same guy for a few years now, what I noticed is in the winter months he will still charge me $90/hour but he shaves a few hours off the job to cut me a break.
You must be using a CERTIFIED shop. That's exactly how it has to be done or sacrifice certification. Posted labor rates are reimbursed labor rates for warranty. It's much easier to shave time than rate. I'm not familiar with any other industry, but certification is costly in the marine business. It's easy to spend $3k per mechanic per year for classes, certs and travel. Shop setup will also run $20k - $30k for proprietary tools and equipment. My personal opinion is that the hourly rate itself becomes almost irrelevant if the shop is professional, keeps your boat clean, fixes your issue the first time and keeps you on the water. If the difference is $5 - $20 per hour, what does it really amount to in our cost of ownership on these money suckers? I think finding the RIGHT guy is way more important than the rate. To the OP question, posted rates around here are $75 - $100 / hr. but most jobs are billed globally at a total cost (preventative maintenance or obvious issues) unless it's a diagnose / repair.
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Old 09-16-2010, 06:51 AM
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I used to haul boats to winter boat shows for a dealer I'm friends with......his mechanics made big bucks at that $100 an hour all summer. How many of you guys break something in Jan-Feb and rush in to get it fixed? Those mechanics sit on their azzes for several months (except boat show weeks) all winter and still get paid something. Marine dealers have to make 12 months worth of bills in the 6-8 months of time they can generate income.

I've found away around those rates, I have had at least one boat at a time for the last 10 years but have not had a boat in for service since 2002. When my buddies have something break, I make a point to go over there and help them fix it. Over the years I've learned ALOT. Now when something of mine breaks they come help me without even asking. At first I was learning to change water pumps, etc. The last couple years we've been building our own engines and outdrives. In my situation the lessons were cheap, but VERY expensive in time.


(I have another friend that has realized how much I've learned and regularly asks me to help him fix something on his own boat........not once has he ever had the time to help anyone else with their boat. You can count on one thumb how many times I've gone out of my way to help him.)
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