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Old 01-17-2010, 05:50 PM
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Default Drying out a wet transom?

The previous owner mounted a step ladder to the transom of my boat and did not seal one of the holes very well. The area around the hole is wet and a area about the size of a orange is really soft. Can the wood be dried out and salvaged if I fix the problem and put a backer plate on the inside for the bolt and nut to secure to?
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Old 01-17-2010, 06:42 PM
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you should cut out the rotted spot and replace it with new wood resin and glass
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Old 01-17-2010, 06:54 PM
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Git-Rot is a possibility but kind of a band aid approach

google it for info
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Old 01-17-2010, 07:00 PM
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I it dries out will the rot spread? I don't see how it will.
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Old 01-17-2010, 09:03 PM
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Usually the rot is in a much arger area than you first suspected. You could drill a bunch of small test holes to determine how far the rot has spread. You can also use these test holes to permit the transom to dry if it isn't a large area. Use Git-Rot as surfcaster says and that should help strengthen the area a little.

Your best bet would be to remove the area that is suspect, replace the core and out back the skin.

I started out replacing a small area on the transom of my formula which quickly lead to replacing the entire thing due to tons of soggy wet wood.
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Old 01-18-2010, 05:03 AM
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I should probably say that this wood is sandwidched between an alluminum hull.
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Old 01-18-2010, 05:18 AM
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I've done a few complete transoms on both fiberglass and aluminum boats,and in most cases what looked like a small area of damage,turned out to be much worse.
What brand of aluminum boat is it?,and is the core completely enclosed between aluminum?,or can you see any exposed wood from the inside of the bilge?

On the aluminums that we did,we were able to cut off the top cap,remove any fasteners that went thru the aluminum and into the core,and then removed the entire transom(what's left of it),by inserting long screw eyes into the upper exposed edge,and lifting it out,while we pused and pried up from the bottom,if accessible.
On some of the others we had to chop away at the rot with everything from chain saws to crow bars,and vacum it out.Every job is different.

Most of the smaller aluminum boats in the 18 to 20 foot range,like Starcrafts,Lunds,etc,only had partial pieces of core between the aluminum.They only used a core where the outboards where mounted,you can usually see that from the inside.
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Last edited by big easy; 01-18-2010 at 05:20 AM. Reason: additional info
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Old 01-18-2010, 05:26 AM
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I just replaced a transom on a 30 year old Sylvan runabout due to rot. If your boat is anything like this one, there is no sealant on any of the penetrations. There was rot in multiple places on the transom. You may want to look a little closer at the boat.

The repair was not really a big job. Derig the engine, pull the aluminum trim, pry out the transom, cut the new transom from marine ply, prime the wood (paint not resin), slip it back in place, reassemble the trim and engine rigging. Total time on the project was about 19 hours and that included cleaning up the wiring a bit.

If you don't replace the transom, I wouldn't use Git-Rot or any other glue type product. It would make the transom stick to the aluminum and be harder to remove when you do need to replace it. Git-Rot is a watery, epoxy based product that would spread around to areas that aren't rotten, gluing the transom in place. And, as you can imagine, being so thin, some of it will surely find it's way to the bilge.
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Old 01-18-2010, 05:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by big easy View Post
I've done a few complete transoms on both fiberglass and aluminum boats,and in most cases what looked like a small area of damage,turned out to be much worse.
What brand of aluminum boat is it?,and is the core completely enclosed between aluminum?,or can you see any exposed wood from the inside of the bilge?

On the aluminums that we did,we were able to cut off the top cap,remove any fasteners that went thru the aluminum and into the core,and then removed the entire transom(what's left of it),by inserting long screw eyes into the upper exposed edge,and lifting it out,while we pused and pried up from the bottom,if accessible.
On some of the others we had to chop away at the rot with everything from chain saws to crow bars,and vacum it out.Every job is different.

Most of the smaller aluminum boats in the 18 to 20 foot range,like Starcrafts,Lunds,etc,only had partial pieces of core between the aluminum.They only used a core where the outboards where mounted,you can usually see that from the inside.

Yes only part of the transom is wood around where the outboard is mounted. You can see it from the inside after I dug out the foam around it that is when I could see that the whole thing did not apear to be rotton.
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Old 01-18-2010, 06:16 AM
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I it dries out will the rot spread? I don't see how it will.
If you get all of the moisture out the rot will not spread. The term Dry-Rot is wrong. Dry-rotten wood is simply wet rotten would that dried out. Dry wood pretty much lasts forever.
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Old 01-18-2010, 06:34 AM
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If you get all of the moisture out the rot will not spread. The term Dry-Rot is wrong. Dry-rotten wood is simply wet rotten would that dried out. Dry wood pretty much lasts forever.

That was my thought
So if I repair the area affected all should be good?
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Old 01-18-2010, 08:17 AM
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see this link, they give a step-by-step instruction with photos....

http://boatbuildercentral.com/howto/...pair/index.php
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Old 01-18-2010, 08:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by good stuff View Post
That was my thought
So if I repair the area affected all should be good?
first off its plywood core, sow how are you going to get the moisture out of the inner layers, you won't. Second off by leaving wood still in there, you still have spores.

I have heard allot of advice from drilling core holes and putting antifreeze in there to soak to getting a bunch of hair driers blowing. Truly the only way to get the moisture out is under vacuum, water will boil @ room temp around 24-8 inches of mercury. That requires very expensive machinery. Listen to Oreely and Pursuit, replace the whole core. Or you might as well just use card board and ducttape.
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Old 01-18-2010, 12:02 PM
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I would replace the complete core as well.It's not that big of a deal.If you have an aluminum cap on top that covers the transom edge,you can just remove it and any other fasteners below,and then pull the core out.

If you can get the wood out in one piece,you can then trace it on to some new plywood.I always use marine fir,and most of the aluminum transoms were 1-1/2" thick.
I glue two 3/4" pieces together with epoxy resin thickened with some cabosil to the consistency of mayonaise and then apply it to the face of the ply with a notched trowel.Laid on a flat floor with weights(cement blocks,rocks,etc),or clamped together,until the resin cures.It will never come apart.

After it's cut to size,you can seal the edges and faces with plain epoxy resin let it cure and slide the new transom back into place.Then just replace the cap and any trim.It's also a good idea to seal any holes you make for the motors or other things like transducers etc,with some resin before you install the bolts or screws.
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Old 01-18-2010, 12:04 PM
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I usually just throw her a towel
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Old 01-18-2010, 02:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseysportfisher View Post
first off its plywood core, sow how are you going to get the moisture out of the inner layers, you won't. Second off by leaving wood still in there, you still have spores.

I have heard allot of advice from drilling core holes and putting antifreeze in there to soak to getting a bunch of hair driers blowing. Truly the only way to get the moisture out is under vacuum, water will boil @ room temp around 24-8 inches of mercury. That requires very expensive machinery. Listen to Oreely and Pursuit, replace the whole core. Or you might as well just use card board and ducttape.
How will the moister in the plywood not dry out if it is not exposed to water?
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Old 01-18-2010, 03:15 PM
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plywood is multiple layers of wood glued together, just because you get the outside dry the inside layers will still hold moisture. Wood is like a sponge, and unless your bringing the boat to Arizona with high temps and no humidity, good luck. It will never be a structurally sound as it was before absorbing the water.
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Old 01-18-2010, 04:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseysportfisher View Post
plywood is multiple layers of wood glued together, just because you get the outside dry the inside layers will still hold moisture. Wood is like a sponge, and unless your bringing the boat to Arizona with high temps and no humidity, good luck. It will never be a structurally sound as it was before absorbing the water.

So every boat that has a transom like mine(wood exposed on the inside) has a moisture problem due to the humidity in the air? The day I roll it off the lot it has a moister problem if that is the case.

Thanks for your help and input but I will have to respectfully disagree with that.
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Old 01-18-2010, 06:17 PM
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Try asking from some Grady White owners http://www.greatgrady.com

I would think they have the most experience fixing rotted and wet transoms.
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Old 01-19-2010, 04:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by good stuff View Post
So every boat that has a transom like mine(wood exposed on the inside) has a moisture problem due to the humidity in the air? The day I roll it off the lot it has a moister problem if that is the case.

Thanks for your help and input but I will have to respectfully disagree with that.
so you have a boat that you can see the transom core from the inside of the boat, its un treated wood, and you feel the reason its soaking wet is because someone drilled holes into it to put a ladder ?
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