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Old 09-17-2009, 09:42 AM
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Default East vs West Coast Boats?

After doing a lot of research it seems that boats on the East Coast are generally less expensive than similar rigs on the West Coast. There is also a lot more stock on the East Coast.

Is there any reason for this?

It also seems that the types of boats used on each cost varies too.

Florida is mainly centre consoles. New Jersey & the Carolinas are express style and I haven't yet worked out what the West Coast style is yet.

Is this to do with sea conditions? I am guessing the Florida thing is due to the heat, but why are there not more Carolina style express boats on the West Coast?

So cost and style differences...what gives?
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Old 09-17-2009, 09:47 AM
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I kinda always wondered why those Alaskan charter Captains use aluminum boats in the 30ft range.I would think a boat like a 35 Henriques maine coaster would be great for up their.I guess it cost to much to bring boats to the west.
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Old 09-17-2009, 09:55 AM
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i recall reading that there are alot of fallen logs and debris in the water in Alaska. that may be one of the reasons?


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I kinda always wondered why those Alaskan charter Captains use aluminum boats in the 30ft range.I would think a boat like a 35 Henriques maine coaster would be great for up their.I guess it cost to much to bring boats to the west.
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Old 09-17-2009, 10:21 AM
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Originally Posted by rat_catcher View Post
After doing a lot of research it seems that boats on the East Coast are generally less expensive than similar rigs on the West Coast. There is also a lot more stock on the East Coast.

Is there any reason for this?

It also seems that the types of boats used on each cost varies too.

Florida is mainly centre consoles. New Jersey & the Carolinas are express style and I haven't yet worked out what the West Coast style is yet.

Is this to do with sea conditions? I am guessing the Florida thing is due to the heat, but why are there not more Carolina style express boats on the West Coast?

So cost and style differences...what gives?
Rat Catcher,

I'm in the same area you are, and have the same fishing passion. Here, far and away the most popular styles of recreational fishing boats are walk-around and pilothouse boats. Grady's, Davis, Radon, Farallon, etc. East Coast manufacturers have attempted to build a presence here, but never really successfully from Northern California north. An example would be Albemarle--had (have?) a dealer in San Diego, but little success northward.

Expresses, for fishing, do okay here, but can be expensive to operate with our long runs.

I've had all kinds of boats out here, and by far, my favorite was my Glacier Bay 260. You'll see quite a few of them out here because they handle our seas exceptionally well (they were originally developed for Pacific NW seas). I personally like the center console version for the 360 degree fishing room, but almost no one around here buys a center console for true offshore fishing (tuna) 'cuz it's just too dang cold! Thus, center consoles just aren't, and never will be, popular offshore fishing machines here.
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Old 09-17-2009, 10:58 AM
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did you say walk-around? check out this guy's new boat on the other thread!

http://www.thehulltruth.com/boating-...-new-sled.html
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Old 09-17-2009, 11:43 AM
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Several references that I've seen describe the forward slanting windshield as a "West Coast" style.

I plan on making this type of windshield in my Tolman Jumbo currently under construction.
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Old 09-17-2009, 11:46 AM
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Generally on the West Coast (exceptions San Franscisco/Sacramento Delta, Columbia River, Puget Sound/Gulf Islands)--you go directly into deep water. East Coast, ICW, more bays; Florida, shoal, especially in the Gulf, and the ICW. West Coast you need moderate protection--NE--lots of protection from the elements. Florida--deal with the heat and sun.

I grew up on the West Coast (Long Beach CA)--and the number of Launching ramps was/ is very limited. Most boats were made to deal with offshore type of conditions, even going to Catalina Island. There are a couple of reefs close in, but some places 3000 feet canyons come right up to the piers. S. Calif, mild weather most of the year. Although limited, in number, most boats were kept in the water.

There are more boats available on the East Coast--just concentrated areas in Calif, Wash and Oregon. The boats in Florida, have high humidity, plus sun, and high temps. It is harder on teak, gel coat and metals.

Certain hull forms work better in the seas which are found locally, so those type of boats tend to proliferate. Definately Aluminum is used for resistance to logs, dead heads and rocks in the PNW--not a lot of sun, so heat is not a factor etc.
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Old 09-17-2009, 11:57 AM
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The weather in the SE compared to the PNW are poles apart requiring somewhat different boats. Driftwood and rock beaches abound in the PNW. Al is popular for simple reasons - easy to fix and low maintenance. Lots of Al boats in SE too but "ruined" by paint. In the NE and great lakes areas there is too short a season - PNW we can boat 12 months no problem. Few canyon runners in the PNW, no need for them as salmon you can catch from a whaler dinghy. Lots of Osprey style clones with enclsoed cabins, diesel heat and bad weather capability. No hurricanes, alligators, snakes or sharks in the PNW - just big bears that really enjoy hunting you on an isolated beach
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Old 09-17-2009, 12:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freeporttuna View Post
I kinda always wondered why those Alaskan charter Captains use aluminum boats in the 30ft range.I would think a boat like a 35 Henriques maine coaster would be great for up their.I guess it cost to much to bring boats to the west.

That would be an excellent boat, inside waters in SE Alaska etc are normally flat, but the wind makes for nasty, steep chop. Ride suffers. The reason for Aluminum is Durability. Beaching, banging around etc. Most boats in alaska tkae the place of cars and trucks, are used everyday, all day. However, there are plenty of F&G boats and boat builders up there.
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Old 09-17-2009, 12:07 PM
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Generally on the West Coast (exceptions San Franscisco/Sacramento Delta, Columbia River, Puget Sound/Gulf Islands)--you go directly into deep water. East Coast, ICW, more bays; Florida, shoal, especially in the Gulf, and the ICW. West Coast you need moderate protection--NE--lots of protection from the elements. Florida--deal with the heat and sun.

I grew up on the West Coast (Long Beach CA)--and the number of Launching ramps was/ is very limited. Most boats were made to deal with offshore type of conditions, even going to Catalina Island. There are a couple of reefs close in, but some places 3000 feet canyons come right up to the piers. S. Calif, mild weather most of the year. Although limited, in number, most boats were kept in the water.

There are more boats available on the East Coast--just concentrated areas in Calif, Wash and Oregon. The boats in Florida, have high humidity, plus sun, and high temps. It is harder on teak, gel coat and metals.

Certain hull forms work better in the seas which are found locally, so those type of boats tend to proliferate. Definately Aluminum is used for resistance to logs, dead heads and rocks in the PNW--not a lot of sun, so heat is not a factor etc.
YES YES YES. I agree. I am from the SE and boating is very different up here. It was a major adjustment for me as I love BIG CC Boats. Here in Seattle, the weather can gloomy from October to April. This summer has been great with very little rain and is continuing now to be wonderful. Today is near 80 Dgress and is going to continue to be that way.

There is a lot of debris in the water out here, so going really fast is not wise. Boston Whaler and similar brands do have a great presence out here, but it is more the Conquest/Express Style in the larger boats. I do believe there is an untapped small segment for SOME large CC boats, but it is a small market segment to go after.

As for shipping, many boat manufacturers differ in how the dealer is charged for shipping. Boston Whaler has standarized shipping for all its dealers. We here in Seattle pay the same price for shipping that a dealer next to the factory in Florida pays. This protects dealerships regionally so that people deal with their local dealer.
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Old 09-17-2009, 04:18 PM
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Quote:
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I'm in the same area you are, and have the same fishing passion.
Some good info here. Thanks. BTW I started this exercise by looking at the Glacier Bay 2690 and then moved onto larger diesel express style boats because I would have issues towing the GB back in Aus when I return due to it being overwidth.

Max width in Australia is 2.5m not the 2.59m (8' 6") you guys have here.

You can tow wider, but you need flashing lights, flags, signs, etc. and there are some restricted roads, dates and times. My problem is that the local boatramp from my house in Australia has restricted roads leading to it due to narrow roads and close cliff faces.

Thus the reason to save the money on the truck and put it into a larger diesel express.

So instead of spending $60k on the GB + $30k on a truck to tow it, I would spend $90k on a diesel express. Make sense?
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Old 09-17-2009, 04:19 PM
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Expresses, for fishing, do okay here, but can be expensive to operate with our long runs.
How many Nautical Miles from Alameda to the tuna grounds?
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Old 09-17-2009, 04:21 PM
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Several references that I've seen describe the forward slanting windshield as a "West Coast" style.
Talking about "West Coast" style, I have seen references to bowrails and pulpits being East vs West Coast Style.

What does this mean?
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Old 09-17-2009, 04:23 PM
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The weather in the SE compared to the PNW are poles apart requiring somewhat different boats. Driftwood and rock beaches abound in the PNW.
I am familiar with the Pacific Northwest being a long time reader of Passagemaker magazine. How similar is boating offshore from San Francisco to the conditions off Seattle?
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Old 09-17-2009, 06:00 PM
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Search for Hatteras - there's quite a thread on a Hatteras 60GT rigged 'West Coast' style.

Essentially - bow rails tall enough (mid-thigh) to fish on the bow and pulpit safely and alot more focus on live bait capacity. Greater tendency to drift fishing live bait in Socal vs. trolling back East.

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Talking about "West Coast" style, I have seen references to bowrails and pulpits being East vs West Coast Style.

What does this mean?
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Old 09-17-2009, 07:08 PM
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How many Nautical Miles from Alameda to the tuna grounds?
From Alameda to the Gate is about 13nm. From the Gate, can be as little (normally) as 40nm realistically, up to maybe 70nm. So total is probably 53-83nm EACH way, plus trolling.
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Old 09-17-2009, 08:11 PM
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Rat Catcher - The boating in the PNW can be in protected waters like the Gulf or San Juan Islands or big water like Georgia Straits, Queen Charlotte Sound or the open wild ocean off the west Coast of Vancouver Island. I've spent much time in SF Bay area and would say there are some intersting similarities, and differences. Offshore, the west coast of Vancouver Island is riddled with places to pull in out of the weather, some inlets going for 30 miles or more. Whereas when you go south from Cape Flattery towards SF there are really limited places to pull in, anchor and enjoy the sites. Except of course for the infamous Columbia River bar. The PNW area is huge in comparison to SF Bay so a boat with large fuel and provisions storage is a worthwhile condsideration. From Seattle to popular spots in Alaska is easily 500 "mostly inland" miles - with far fewer provisioning points than the SF Bay area. I keep my boat in Canada on Vancouver Island, about 80 mi NW of Seattle. Much better weather and less crowded.
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Old 09-17-2009, 08:53 PM
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there are many boat builders in the PNW. in the wood boat era lake union in seattle was packed with boat builders. most of them are gone but Jensen Motorboat company still exists. They made long narrow boats. in the 20s they were very square but in time they came out more rounded. none had flybridges at that time. now Jensen is a repair only facility and no boats are made in lake union. the real estate is too expensive. its all marinas, brokerages and dealers, oh and house boats of course. but the builders that i know of that still do exist in this area are seasport and oceansport, osprey, skagit orca, bayliner, ranger tugs, maybe nordic tugs. if i had to put my hands around one northwest style boat, it would be the 55 alaskan/55 fleming, 490 meridian/ 45 bay, trilevel trawler. that layout has influenced the design of countless other brands/models. its got a bridge and then a little lower and aft, a salon, and then lower than that under the bridge are the staterooms and heads. above the main bridge is a flybridge. to me thats northwest style.
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Old 09-18-2009, 08:32 AM
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I have wondered about this too. The majority of boats I see in New England for example are cruisers with canvas tops. I never understood that...when I began shopping for my next boat three years ago I gravitated to the West Coast designs with a fully enclosed pilot house and ZERO canvas. I was also interested in AL but I could not find an AL manufacturer on the East Coast that made production boats. They were all custom and 3 times the cost compared to the same size production AL boat from West Coast manufacturers. None of the West Coast AL manufacturers had dealerships on the East Coast. I did not prioritize traveling to the West Coast to kick the tires on AL boats so I opted for a West Coast fiberglass cat (C-Dory Tomcat) available at dealerships in the East Coast.
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Old 09-18-2009, 08:42 AM
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There is a new boat being built that is the best of both worlds. Its the BAMF 29 Fish-around. It like a center consol but more like a pilot house. There is an enclosed cabin with head, sink, seating for 6 and ample storage, there's also a v-birth. There is 360 degrees of fiishing and two large fishhold that could be 3 with outboards. The people who build these are Alaskan Charter Boat operators and experienced Boat builders. They also build a 29 pilot house and a 25 pilot house and plan on adding a 25 fish-around. Iv'e seen theese boats in Action and there pretty awsome. The north west boats are built for year around use tempertures that range from 20-90 degrees. So thay need to insullated and also built strong because of the beatings they endure. That why Sea-sports, Osprey, Orca's and metal boats are popular. I Think this BAMF Boat will become the next hot thing its a 20th century boat.
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