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Old 03-21-2004, 03:26 PM
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Default Driving lights

I'm tired of a handeld spotlight. I want to mount some headlights on my console
grabrail. Here are my criteria:
1)long range illumination
2)good in haze and fog. I have found that a 300,000 cp blue max works
better on the water than a 1,000,000 cp light.
3)positionable
4)12v powered
I have considered some KC Daylighters- 100w or 150w. They are rugged,
well warrantied, and reasonably priced per quality, compard to some of the high dollar"marine" lights. Maybe I need 2 sets,headlights and fog lights. Or floods pointed more to the sides and spots to the front. I'm trying to figure out the best combo. I'm looking for a serious light setup, not just some docking light setup. I want lights that will inspire confidence running hard at night, navigating rough jetties with no moon, etc.
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Old 03-21-2004, 03:34 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

Hi Striperman

On my previous boat I mounted the lights high up on the cabin . . . BIG MISTAKE

At night the light reflected off of the railings and all of the other shiney stuff . . . couldn't see anything else . . .

Mounted the lights onto the bow railings and it worked great
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Old 03-21-2004, 03:41 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

Thanks Auguste. I hadn't considered mounting them further forward. I have
no bow rail, so for a forward application a custom gunwale mount would be in order.
What type of lights do you have, and what are the specs?thanks.
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Old 03-21-2004, 04:00 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

On the previous boat I had a bow mounted remote search light . . . about 750,000 candles I think . . . was plenty strong for my needs . . . got the white casing and not the stainless casing so that I would not get the halo shine around the light

Miss-Be-haven has two lights mounted recessed into the bow . . . not totally happy with that situation . . . they work well but don't light to the sides . . . will probably mount a pair of lights onto the radar arch with one pointing to each side

Hope my rambling on helps you a bit
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Old 03-21-2004, 04:03 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

Spot/flood lights can only be used for a few minutes to check for buoys, markers and obstructions and then must be shut off per the USCG. They can not be used as headlights and such. There was a thread concerning USCG citations for running with spot/flood lights on for more than a couple of minutes on the Boatered.com board recently. Seems they are fining for it. The lights can and will affect your night vision as well as others.

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Old 03-21-2004, 04:14 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

Lights may be helpful to you, but will be a problem for the rest of us out there on the water. There is a reason that boats don't come with headlights or spotlights. I hope you are joking about running hard through inlets on moonless nights.

-c
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Old 03-21-2004, 04:24 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

the USCG are issuing tickets for boaters using excessive lighting here in Florida....what about a decent colored chart plotter that you can see at night?
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Old 03-21-2004, 04:40 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

Chessie and Chalkie are right . . . I didn't catch you were looking for running lights . . . need to read more carefully

Running with lights doen't work . . . no matter how powerful you can not avoid floating debris

Lights are only good for search and rescue MOB situations, reading numbers off of buoys to confirm position, when wanting to dock etc.

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Old 03-21-2004, 04:49 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

Agreed with the above

DRIVING LIGHTS are red and green and fixed to the hull. A hand held spotlight is a good way to make sure you don't over use the spotlights.
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Old 03-21-2004, 05:04 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

Maybe we should all resort to driving our cars around at night
with hand held spots lights and only shining them every few minutes.
Wouldn't want to hurt anyones "nightvision"!!! I think it sould be mandatory for
all boats to have head lights. I GUARTANTEE that the night accident stats would
greatly diminish as a result. You guys are F-----G nuts!!!! Running in the dark vrs.
illumination? NO CONTEST. I personally know of several accidents resulting from night boating, ALL a result of running in the dark with "nightvision". Recently some teenagers were badly injured and one killed on my striper lake. Headlights would've saved them. On the same lake I almost hit some guys anchored without lights. I was running 25-30 mph, shining a q-beam periodically. They happened to be in between periods. I could've killed them. With lights on I would have seen them in plenty of time. On the other hand, I have heard of NO accidents on the water as a result of someone being blinded by a running light. More of just an inconvenience, jusk like it is when driving a vehicle. The saved lives would be way more worth the inconvenience. I'd rather see someone coming from miles away and vice versa. But then there was the Sheriff with nightvision goggles that I hit with a q-beam... Don't have to tell you what happened there...
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Old 03-21-2004, 05:14 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

If you notice when boat catalogs sell lights that are built in to the bow, or the lights you see on pontoon boats at the front, the are called "Docking Lights", meant to be used for docking purposes only.

You WILL get a citation if you drive with these lights on!!!!!!

A remote spotlight or handheld is the only legal light you can drive with, and you must not shine it at other boaters.
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Old 03-21-2004, 05:29 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

Quote:
STRIPERMAN - 2004-03-21 6:04 PM

...I was running 25-30 mph, shining a q-beam periodically...
Maybe if you slowed down after dark you wouldn't "almost" hit someone or something. And I bet those night accident stats would go down if people didn't try to run as fast as they do during the day.

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Old 03-21-2004, 07:02 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

A standard 360 light on a small boat can be seen for miles. In fact, I think the regs say that is has to be visible from 2 miles.

Both during the day and at night the things that are most likely to cause you problems while underway lurk just below the surface of the water. Lights won't help you.

Cars don't have 1M cp, positional headlights for a reason.

Maybe you should put the spotlight down and concentrate on the task at hand.

-c
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Old 03-21-2004, 07:17 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

Striper,

I have to agree on this one. The plotter and radar will help you to navigate in open water. When you are approaching known obstructions like a jetty, inlet or marker, its best to slow down and use the light to confirm what the plotter or radar is showing you, then turn the light off.

We do a lot of night fishing and running around with your "headlights" on just annoys everyone. You can actually see a lot more with your eyes simply adjusted to the dark.

I do point the remote light at that yahoo doing 40 thats "coming straight for us" once in a while to make sure he sees me.

Its best to slow down to a reasonable speed at night. Even in perfect conditions (no fog etc...) by the time the light hits a dark colored, half submerged object, its too late....never mind in reduced visibility.

Good luck,
Scott
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Old 03-21-2004, 07:19 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

Been boating for thirty years. Don't patronize me.(not you Scott, you're a gentleman) Leave that for your kids.
I'm talking about lives that could've been saved with fixed postional lights
based on my experience on the water. I do most of my fishing at night. I run
@ the slowest speed my boat will stay on plane. This is asked of me by Texas Parks
and Wildlife, and I gladly oblige. Lots of folks down here fish jetties at night for speckled trout. Sometimes it gets windy and rough, and you go home. It would be much safer to
have fixed lights and both hands on the wheel through a ripping unlit boat cut.
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Old 03-21-2004, 07:39 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

What about the lives fellows????????Too annoyed to care?????I could give details of several more accidents that IMO would have been prevented with lights!!!!!!!Car lights in my eyes are annoying too!!!!!But they make it much safer. Some of you are being arrogant and missing my point. And for those of you(most of you) in dissagreement, what do you say about the statistics? In a perfect world everyone would obey suggested night speeds, have radars and chart plotters, not drink on the water, be knowledgable enough to boat in a given area at night, use common sense, etc. But this aint the way it is! Lights would save people. Some of you must agree.
The fact of the matter is people will continue to boat at night. Accidents will continue
to happen at night. Lights on boats would prevent many more of these accidents than
they would cause.
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Old 03-21-2004, 07:46 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

Striperman you might want to read the USCG COLREGS regarding the use of lights:



—INLAND—

Lights and Shapes

PART C—LIGHTS AND SHAPES

RULE 20

Application

(a) Rules in this Part shall be complied with in all weathers.

(b) The Rules concerning lights shall be complied with from sunset

to sunrise, and during such times no other lights shall be exhibited,

except such lights as cannot be mistaken for the lights specified in

these Rules or do not impair their visibility or distinctive character, or

interfere with the keeping of a proper look-out.

(c) The lights prescribed by these Rules shall, if carried, also be

exhibited from sunrise to sunset in restricted visibility and may be

exhibited in all other circumstances when it is deemed necessary.

(d) The Rules concerning shapes shall be complied with by day.

(e) The lights and shapes specified in these Rules shall comply

with the provisions of Annex I of these Rules.

*
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Old 03-21-2004, 08:00 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights


I ran ferries and water taxis for ten years at night and have been nighttime boating for 25 yrs and the many mishaps I have witnessed and the bozzos that I've narrowly avoided hitting all had one of two things in common: either their running lights were not operating properly or the boat was being operated at an excessive rate of speed. If all boaters followed the rules of the road, had properly operating running lights and only used "spot lights" for quick (2 second) sweeps (if at all!!), there would be far fewer nighttime accidents and close calls. We don't need any additional "running lights". I agree that your eyes do adjust to the dark and therefore should pick-up properly operating running lights of other boats in the area. Also, there is nothing worse than having a high intensity spot light shined in your eyes while running at night- it takes your eyes quite a while to adjust- very dangerous, so please, keep their use to a very brief (2 seconds max) sweep.
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Old 03-21-2004, 08:09 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

If you want to see better...why not invest in a set of night vision goggles.....they are at a reasonable price now and work great...then if you decide you need more light or there is no ambient light you can rig a infrared spotlight...which can't be detected more than about 30 yards by a human eye and it will make those goggles come alive.........
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Old 03-21-2004, 08:17 PM
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Default RE: Driving lights

Lights on boats would prevent many more of these accidents than
they would cause.

If that were true, why do all the experts say to not run with lights. Of course the Coast Guard has no maritime experience, not near as much as you. You've run many more hours at night than the entire USCG. Let's not forget all those tug skippers that run all the thousands of miles of waterways over the past years. You could teach them a thing or two as well.....
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