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Old 05-18-2003, 01:19 PM
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Default inboard/outboard versas outboard motors

Buying my first boat and i live in savannah, GA, I have a great oppertunity to buy an I/O Mariah 222 Shaba 1999 w/75hrs this will be for our family however i been advised that in the salt water its better for me to buy something w/ an outboard ? However with proper care i can enjoy either type !!! Please help me to chose I/O or outboard.
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Old 05-18-2003, 02:10 PM
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Default inboard/outboard versas outboard motors

Welcome aboard! If you like that boat you really do not have a choice as its only available with a sterndrive. Are you looking for a family runabout /cruiser in that size? If so most will probably be i/o. Personally I prefer an outboard in the salt but if I were running an i/o I would do all possible in the way of preventive maintanence an unload it before it got to the nickel and dime point. If you do not plan on keeping this boat for a long time you can certainly get great service out of it over the next few years. A lot also depends on if you will storing this boat in the water or not. If not the boat will fare better with a freshwater flushing and bath after each use.

Brian
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Old 05-18-2003, 03:55 PM
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Default inboard/outboard versas outboard motors

If you're planning to trailer the boat, and keep it at your house, then a family boat with an I/O won't be much of a problem in the salt. Flush it thoroughly after every use, change the oil every few months, and for goodness sake, RUN THE BILGE BLOWER BEFORE YOU TURN THE KEY!

Outboards are inherently safer than I/O's because the engine is not located in an area where gas fumes can collect. That is what the bilge blower is for.

As far as life, both can last a long time after using them in salt water (mine is 29 years old, and I am just now planning an engine change). An I/O weighs more, takes up space in the boat, cannot be left sitting in salt water, but is cheaper and easy on fuel as long as you don't run it hard.

If you like the boat, plan on trailering it and can take care of it (regular cleaning, engine flushes, etc), then go for it. Just remember - Safety First.
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Old 05-18-2003, 04:10 PM
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Default inboard/outboard versas outboard motors

I'm gonna take a stab and guess you went to Embry-Riddle? Reason I say that is because it is where I went to college.
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Old 05-18-2003, 04:20 PM
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Default inboard/outboard versas outboard motors

quote:Originally posted by seabird23:
I'm gonna take a stab and guess you went to Embry-Riddle? Reason I say that is because it is where I went to college.

Yes I did, graduated in 89. When did you graduate? Are you a pilot?
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Old 05-18-2003, 05:12 PM
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Default inboard/outboard versas outboard motors

Graduated in '98 and yes I am a pilot. I don't fly for a living though. Great school (tuition has jumped quite a bit though ). They keep adding more and more programs every year.
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Old 05-19-2003, 07:09 AM
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Default inboard/outboard versas outboard motors

I/O's are more of a pain. I've had both, and currently have an I/O. There is a little more maintenance, but nothing that's going to kill you.

Conversely, I don't think that the fuel savings of an I/O is that much better than an outboard, since the usual comparisons are "all other things being equal", which is never the case. HP for HP, an outboard will get poorer mileage BUT 2 strokes develop more power for a given displacement. The added weight of an I/O cuts into your mileage savings, to the point where there really ins't that much differnece in many applications.

If you look at Trophy's web site, they have a 20' available in both I/O or outboard. If you look at the performance #'s for both, you will see that the I/O doesn't have a tremendous fuel savings over the same hull with an outboard.

As far as salt water goes, this is no big deal. People will have you think that putting an I/O in salt water means instant destruction, the sky is falling, blah blah blah. If you change your anodes when you are supposed to, and keep an eye on them (I visually inspect at mine every 2 weeks) you can go years without problems, even in saltwater. If you have the wrong kind of anodes for the water you're in, or if you were unfortunate enough to have a certain outdrive known to have a design flaw for a couple of model years, then yes you could have problems.

My boat stays in salt water all summer and I'm going on 4 years with my I/O. I'm in no way saying I/O's are better (I think cheaper is the operative word) but the issue of outdrives in salt water is greatly exaggerated.

The main advantages that I/O's have over outboards are:
1)Easier for backyard mechanics to do things on something resembling a car engine.
2)No issues about mixing oil & gas
3)Generally quieter and less stinky
4)Sometimes cheaper
5)The weight is inside the boat and down low, not hanging off the transom and up high
The advantages of outboards are:
1)You can trim it up all the way out of the water
2)less maintenance
3)No issues with runnign at high rpm's

I realize I listed fewer advantages for outboards, but the 2 I did list are pretty significant. If you can trim your engine up out of the salt water, you can listen to corrosion prevention discussions with merely an academic interest. Anyone who changed the bellows on an I/O (myself included) can attest to what a pain it is, so even thought the maintenance isn't that much more. I pull my outdrive off every year and stick in in my basement. I doubt many people with 225 hp outboards do that.
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Old 05-19-2003, 08:14 AM
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Default inboard/outboard versas outboard motors

I think Jobowker hit about all of the points I can think of. The biggest pain for me is keeping growth off of the drive and trim tabs for that matter. My boat is in the water 11 1/2 months out of the year. Going on 4 years old and the drive has been good to me other than the painting and prepping which sucks. Being able to work on the engine is a plus as I am learning to do more things myself which is cheaper than paying labor for a mechanic. As for mileage, with the new HPDI and 4-stroke engines, it's a non-issue...pretty much even. For me, it's a better solution than the outboards since my rig was built with an inboard engine in mind and the weight distribution combined with the jackshaft set up and responsiveness of the duoprop are pretty hard to beat...boat rides like a dream and is very easy to handle.

All in all, if I ever go to a larger boat (center console), I'd look at twin HDPI engines. All engines break and none of them last forever...BTW - nearly 4 years in the water and zero signs of corrosion.

GP
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Old 05-19-2003, 11:17 AM
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Default inboard/outboard versas outboard motors

There's a lot in the achhives on this subject...

Two things not mentioned enough above

The new OB's can get the same fuel economy but the initial cost is significant!

OB's are inherently safer due to the separation of the fuel and motor. With an I/O or IB you usually have the fuel tanks in the same enclosed compartment as the engines with a greater possibliity of fire/explosion hazzard.
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Old 05-19-2003, 01:38 PM
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Default inboard/outboard versas outboard motors

Also not mentioned above repowering. An outboard is much easier to do so and when the time comes you can step up to newer technology. With an i/o you are limited somewhat in your repower options and its much more of a pain and therefore more expensive labor wise. The i/o is probably going to cost you more to maintain in the long run especially in the salt. The bellows, gimbal bearing, exhaust manifolds, risers, all are going to wear need maintenance and eventual replacement. There is just more things to go wrong and more potential cost.

Brian
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