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Old 07-30-2003, 07:26 PM
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Default following seas

Hey guys, what is the best way to navigate through following seas that are on your quarter.

This weekend on our way back we were in following seas of 4-6 feet on the port quarter with a 25 knt wind. The boat was yawing and even broached once. What is the best way to get through it.

the boat is a 26 ft striper w/a with a 250 yam osx

thanks

JB
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Old 07-30-2003, 07:34 PM
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Default following seas

I personally like to get on the back of one wave and stay there, at 90 degrees to the wave. You have to be sure one does not sneak up on you. Patience is the word. At all cost, keep the bow from steering the boat and causing a broach. Keep the bow high with the tabs down, engine trimmed in. You may have to tack your way to the destination. I remember reading an article about Tred Barta (famous sportsman) actually backing into an inlet; keeping the bow into the waves. A little extreme, but I don't see why it wouldn't work. If the waves are extreme you may have to change your destination.

Boston Whaler, "MUMBLER", 24' Outrage, twin 175 HP Evinrude Ocean Pros. Snowball, the cat...
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Old 07-30-2003, 07:55 PM
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Default following seas

quote:Originally posted by Mumblerone:
At all cost, keep the bow from steering the boat and causing a broach. Keep the bow high with the tabs down, engine trimmed in. ...

Mumbler- Either I'm badly confused or I misunderstood your post. To keep the bow up in a following sea, I thought you would keep the tabs UP and the engine trimmed OUT.

Am I missing something?

Drifter
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Old 07-30-2003, 08:18 PM
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Default following seas

quote:Originally posted by Drifter:
To keep the bow up in a following sea, I thought you would keep the tabs UP and the engine trimmed OUT ...
[/b]

You are correct Drifter ... we all know that's what Mumblerone meant

"Life's too short to own an ugly boat ..."
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Old 07-30-2003, 08:18 PM
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Default following seas

JB,
In this sea condition I like to use the trial and error method. I will usually run with the engines all the way down and the trim tabs down 25%. It depends if your doing for comfort or speed in this situation. Sometimes you have to adjust the tabs up or down depending on the sea conditions. I wish there was a chart that would tell you where to put the engines (trim) and where to put the tabs but I've never found the conditions on Lake Erie that easy to understand.

When I'm running for comfort I always keep the engines trimmed in all the way and tabs extended all the way down. This sucks for efficiency but is good for a soft ride. If I'm alone I will usually run at 45MPH with the engines up about 15% and the tabs down slightly to adjust for lean one way or the other.
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Old 07-30-2003, 08:22 PM
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Default following seas

No..you didn't..Mumblerone got turned around a little.

Keep the bows up to prevent the bow from "digging in" and broaching the boat. Trim Tabs all the way up and your Yam Trim indicator up to at least a three bar. Keep speed up enough to maintain positive steering control. Go as fast as the boat will let you while letting you maintain total control. If you start to "jump" the wave ahead you're going too fast. I think quartering seas are easier than straight downhill because you can be on top of two or more waves at once. All boats are different in their handling characteristics under these conditions. Some, obviously are better than others. A displacement boat want the waves to go on past while "chugging" ahead. Deep "V" boats like to "carve" their way thru the waves. Single engine operation is twice as hard as twins. (A twin power setup is never going to broach if the operator knows how to spin the butt of the boat under the engines!)

If you broached in 4-6' you were doing one of two things wrong...either you were going too fast or... not fast enough! That's why many seamen consider a downhill or quarter seas a "throttle control" situation. It's a moment by moment control situation that takes a fantastic amount of concentration.

Go out of your way to practice as long as you can safely do so. Go out on a "sh__ty" that go 2-3' waves and play around with them. That's the time to learn!


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Old 07-30-2003, 10:03 PM
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Default following seas

quote:Originally posted by Reel-Rascals:
quote:Originally posted by Drifter:
To keep the bow up in a following sea, I thought you would keep the tabs UP and the engine trimmed OUT ...
[/b]

You are correct Drifter ... we all know that's what Mumblerone meant

http://tht.sunfx.net/Reel-Rascals/Mooring-Small.jpg "Life's too short to own an ugly boat ..."

Snowball the cat must have distracted him.

Drifter
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Old 07-31-2003, 04:08 AM
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Default following seas

jb, change course! Seriously, alter your course so you can take the seas to beam until you have a straighter shot toward your destination, so you have a following sea behind you instead of the quartering sea. All the other suggestions are correct, at least I believe them, as speed is enemy. Full time throttle control is a must in any following sea!
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Old 07-31-2003, 06:20 AM
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Default following seas

Each boat is different as stated. On my deepV boats I run a normal cruise in a following sea. That is I am always cutting through the back of the wave. The only time I had trouble was when I got my first Bertram and I went too slow. Two years ago I passed a guy in a 28 Albie doing about 10 kts. I thought he had engine problems so I stopped to offer help. He said it was the following seas that had him running slow. I tried to get him to give it the gas; but he resisted. His boat is almost exactly the same hull as my 28 Bertram; and it just ate up following seas. I have found if go too slow the wave just throws you around. I even trim the bow down to knift through the back of the wave. That way you turn 4-6 footers into 1-2 footers. Remember the following sea wave is sloped in the direction of your travel. The face on the headsea side would make me slow down big time. That is why lots of heavy DeepV boats can eat up following seas. Next time try more power. As for shooting inlets in big following seas I recommend jumping on the back of a wave and riding that one wave in. Keep the power regulated to stay on the back.
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Old 07-31-2003, 06:57 AM
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Default following seas

Had the situation last year coming home from Cape May Rips. I surfed the waves and cut inbetween the troughs until the next wave and rode it as a followingsea down the face then cut across. Did this till I had a straight shot(following) to inlet. My boat rides bow heavy so it makes it more difficult with the bow steering and engine trimmed up. Had crew all in stern so I could keep the engine tucked in more.
Each boat behaves differently so practice in different conditions
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Old 07-31-2003, 10:22 AM
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Default following seas

the last two posts capture my experience...
boats handle VERY differently in these seas,
and some can just carry on, but others may
well need to change course to comfort if not
for safety. dan
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Old 07-31-2003, 02:56 PM
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Default following seas

Yup! Brain fade! You guys are tough. Just seeing if anybody is reading! Blame the cat.

Boston Whaler, "MUMBLER", 24' Outrage, twin 175 HP Evinrude Ocean Pros. Snowball, the cat...
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